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Cover Photograph — Laura Ott. Photography by student photographers 
Steve Anderson, Laura Ott and Sharon Thatcher-Couturier. Layout, Pat 
Schuette. The Bulletin of Palm Beach Junior College, Vol. 43-1 . Published 
four times annually — January, March, July and November, by Palm Beach 
Junior College, Lake Worth, FL 33461 . 



THE BULLETIN 



■R£^.?V 




4200 Congress Avenue 
Lake Worth, Florida 33461 

Area Code 305 
Telephone 439-8000 



CONTENTS, 

TRUSTEES ..................... 

CALENDAR 

ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL 

PROFESS/SUPERVISORY PERSONNEL. . . 
ACADEMIC DEPARTMENT CHAIRPERSONS 

AND ASSISTANTS 

FACULTY 

PART-TIME INSTRUCTORS 

EMERITUS FACULTY-ADMINISTRATION. . . . 

CONFIDENTIAL PERSONNEL 

CLASSIFIED PERSONNEL 



Contents 



Trustees 

Calendar 

Administrative Personnel 

Personnel Lists 

THIS IS PBJC 5 

History 3 

PBJC District 4 

Student Affairs and Services 4 

GENERAL REGULATIONS 5 

Methods of Admission 5 

Admission Procedures 6 

PBJC Fees 6 

Student Classifications 

Attendance 

Grading 

Policies 

EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITIES 

Continuing Education 8 

CEU Offerings 8 

Community Services 8 

Continuing Education Projects 8 

Cooperative Education 8 

International/lntercultural Education 8 

HOW TO CHOOSE YOUR PROGRAM 8 

Non-Degree Programs 9 

Associate in Science 9 

Associate in Arts 9 

Graduation Requirements 9 

Help in Making Your Choice 9 

LISTS — Departments, Majors 9 

FLORIDA'S COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM 10 

DEPARTMENTS, PROGRAMS AND COURSES 10 

How to Use This Section 10 

Art 10 

Business 12 

Communications 15 

Criminal Justice 16 

Dental Health 17 

Engineering Technology 17 

Library 20 

Mathematics 20 

Music 21 

Nursing 22 

Physical Education 23 

Related Health Programs 23 

Science 25( 

Social Science 26: 

Index 27! 



Palm Beach Junior College 
District Board of Trustees 





Mrs. Hisetta S. Dyson 



Mrs. Homer J. Hand 
Vice Chairman 




Dr. Phillip O. Lichtblau 
Chairman 





Mr. Willard Findling 



Mr. George A. Michael 



Student Calendar 

Student Calendar 

SPRING TERM 1980-81 

ADr il 20 Deadline for regular admission for SPRING TEI 

April 20-May'V .' • • • Extended admiss 

Apr il 27 Final day to complete all application for procedures 

regular admission as a day student, 3:00 p 

Apri l 27 Finat day to reactivate files for regular admiss 

May 5 Final da y t0 withdraw with 100% refu 

May 6 . . . . Orientation, Advising and Registration for day students by appointm< 
May 6 . . Registration for new & returning evening students, 6:00-9:00 p, 

May 7 .7.7.7.' Late Registrar 

May 7 Classes be 

May 7, 11, 12 Days to correct schedules due to error o 

Day students 9:00 a.m.-12 noon; Evening students 6:00-9:00 p 

May 13 Registration for Senior Citizens 1:00-3:00 p 

May 13 Final day to withdraw with 80% refi 

May 21 Final day to complete application for graduati 

May 25 Memorial Day Holic 

June 1-4. . . . . . Currently enrolled students register for SUMMER (Pay fees June 

June 1-4 Currently enrolled students register for FALL (Pay fees July 

j une 4 Final day to withdraw from class with a "\ 

June 4. ... 7 Final da y t0 change from credit to au 

June 17. . Final examinatio 

June 17 7. Grades due in Registrar's Office, 4:00 p 



SUMMER TERM 1980-81 

June 2 Deadline for regular admission for SUMMER TEI 

June 3-18 Extended admiss 

June 9 Final day to complete all application procedures 

regular admission as a day student, 3:00 p 

June 9 Final day to reactivate files for regular admiss 

June 16 Final day to withdraw with 100% refi 

June 17 Orientation, Advising and Registration for day students by appointmi 

June 17 Registration for evening students 6:00-9:00 p 

June 18 • • • Late Registrat 

June 18 Classes be 

June 18, 22, 23 Days to correct schedules due to error o 

Day students 9:00 a.m.-12 noon; Evening students 6:00-9:00 p 

June 23 Registration for Senior Citizens 1:00-3:00 p 

June 23 Final day to withdraw with 80% ref 

July 2 Final day to complete application for graduati 

July 16 Final day to withdraw from class with a "W", 3:00 p 

July 16 Final day to change from credit to audit, 3:00 p, 

July 20-23 Currently enrolled students register for FALL TERM (Pay fees July 

July 30 Final examinatio 

July 30 Grades due in Registrar's Office 4:00 p. 



Student Calendar 

FALL TERM 1981-82 

^ 27 Deadline for regular admission for FALL TERM 

1 28-August 21 Extended admissions 

just 3 Final day to complete all application procedures for 

regular admission as a day student, 3:00 p.m. 

ust 3 Final day to reactivate files for regular admission 

just 14 Final day to withdraw with 100% refund, 4:00 p.m. 

just 17, 18, 19, 20 Orientation, Advising and -Registration 

for days students by appointment 

just 17 Registration for returning evening students, 6:00-9:00 p.m. 

just 18, 19, 20 . . . Registration for new & returning evening students (6:00-9:00 p.m.) 

lust 21 Late registration 

just 24 Classes begin 

lust 24-28 Days to correct schedules (1:00-3:00 p.m.) 

lust 24-27 Evenings to correct schedules (6:00-9:00 p.m., evening students) 

lust 28 Registration for Senior Citizens, 1 :00-3:00 p.m. 

lust 28 Final day to withdraw with 80% refund, 4:00 p.m. 

tember 7 Labor Day Holiday 

tember30 Final day to complete application for graduation 

ober 19 Eight weeks progress report period ends 

'ember 2 Final day to withdraw from class with a "W" 

ember 2 Final day to change from credit to audit 

ember 5-20 Currently enrolled students register (Pay fees by Dec. 14) 

ember 26-27 Thanksgiving Holidays 

ember 15-18 Final examinations 

ember 18 Grades due in Registrar's Office, 4:00 p.m. 



WINTER TERM 1981-82 

:ember 14 Deadline for regular admission for WINTER TERM 

:ember 15-January 6 Extended admission 

:ember 21 Final day to complete application procedures for 

regular admission as a day student, 3:00 p.m. 

:ember 21 Final day to reactivate files for regular admission 

:ember22 Final day to withdraw with 100% refund 

uary 4, 5 Orientation, Advising and Registration 

for day students by appointment 

uary 4, 5 Registration for new and returning evening students (6:00-9:00 p.m.) 

uary 6 Late registration 

uary 7 Classes begin 

uary 7, 8, 11, 12, 13 Days for correcting schedules 

(1:00-3:00 p.m., day students) 

uary 7, 11, 12, 13 Evenings to correct schedules 

(6:00-9:00 p.m., evening students) 

uary 13 Registration for Senior Citizens, 1:00-3:30 p.m. 

uary 13 Final day to withdraw with 80% refund 

iruary 17 Final day to complete application for graduation 

ch 3 Eight weeks progress report period ends 

ch 17 Final day to withdraw from class with a "W" 

ch 17 Final day to change from credit to audit 

ch 22-26 Currently enrolled students register for SPRING (Pay fees April 29) 

ch 22-26 Currently enrolled students register for SUMMER (Pay fees June 10) 

ch 29-April 7 ..... . Currently enrolled students register for FALL (Pay fees July 12) 

il 9 Easter Holidays 

il 27-30 Final, examinations 

il 30 Grades due in Registrar's Office, 4:00 p.m. 

y A . Commencement Exercises 

Rp^fh Innirtr r*n Ham 



each Junior CoIIega 5 

Library ^- 



Student Calendar 

SPRING TERM 1981-82 

April 19 Deadline for regular admission for SPRING TEF 

April 20-May 6 Extended admissi 

April 26 Final day to complete all application procedures ' 

regular admission as a day student, 3:00 p. 

April 26 Final day to reactivate files for regular admissi 

May 4 Final day to withdraw with 100% refu 

May 5 Orientation, Advising and Registrati 

for day students by appointmt 

May 5 Registration for new and returning evening studer 

(6:00-9:00 p.r 

May 6 Late registrati 

May 6 Classes bej 

May 6, 10, 11 Days to correct schedules due to error or 

Day students 1:00-3:00 p.m.; Evening students 6:00-9:00 p. 

May 11 Registration for Senior Citizens, 1:00-3:00 p. 

May 11 Final day to withdraw with 80% refu 

May 17 Final day to complete application for graduati 

May 24-27 Currently enrolled students register for SUMMER (Pay fees June 

May 24-27 Currently enrolled students register for FALL (Pay fees July 

May 31 Memorial Day Holid 

June 2 Final day to withdraw from class with a "V 

June 2. . . * Final day to change from credit to au 

June 16 Final examinatio 

June 16 Grades due in Registrar's Office, 4:00 p. 



SUMMER TERM 1981-82 

June 2 Deadline for regular admission for SUMMER TEF 

June 3-21 Extended admissi 

June 9 Final day to complete all application procedures 1 

regular admission as a day student, 3:00 p. 

June 9 Final day to reactivate files for regular admissi 

June 16 Final day to withdraw with 100% refu 

June 17 Orientation, Advising and Registrati 

for day students by appointme 

June 17 Registration for evening students, 6:00-9:00 p. 

June 21 Late registrati 

June 21 Classes beg 

June 21-23 Days to correct schedules due to error or 

Day students 1:00-3:00 p.m.; Evening students 6:00-9:00 p. 

June 23 Registration for Senior Citizens, 1:00-3:00 p. 

June 23 Final day to withdraw with 80% refu 

July 1 Final day to complete application for graduati 

July 5 Independence D 

July 19 Final day to withdraw from class with a "W", 3:00 p. 

July 19 Final day to change from credit to audit, 3:00 p. 

July 19-22 Currently enrolled students register for FALL TERM (Pay fees July \ 

July 29 Final examinatio 

July 29. Grades due in Registrar's Office, 4:00 p. 



CALENDAR DATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE 
WITHOUT NOTICE 



ADMINISTRATIVE PERSONNEL 





DR. EDWARD M. EISSEY 
President 



DR. PAUL W.GRAHAM 
Vice President, 

Academic Affairs 





G. TONY TATE 
ce President, 
Business Affairs 



DR. ELISABETH W. ERLING 
Vice President, Planning and 
Information Systems 



DR.MELVINHAYNES.JR. 
Vice President, 

Student Affairs 




Ft. CECIL CON LEY 
ovost - Glades Center 



DR. OTTIS R. SMITH 
Provost - North Center 



JAMES W. TANNER 
Dean of Instruction and 

Student Personnel — 

South Center 



Staff 

Administrative Personnel 



EISSEY, EDWARD M Presider 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
GRAHAM, PAUL W Vice President, Academic Affair 

B.S., Mississippi State College 

M.A., University of Mississippi 

Ed.D., University of Mississippi 
HAYNES, MELVIN, JR Vice President, Student Affair 

B.S., Florida A & M University 

M.Ed., S.Ed., Ed.D., University of Georgia 
TATE, G. TONY Vice President, Business Affair 

B.S., State Teachers College 

M.S., Florida State University 

Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
CONLEY, CECIL Provost, Glades Cente 

B.S., M.S., University of Kentucky 

Ph.D., N.C. State University 
ERLING, ELISABETH W Vice President, Planning and Information System: 

B.S., Nebraska State Teachers College 

M.A., University of Wyoming 

Ed.D., Nova University 
HARVEY, OTIS P., JR Dean, Continuing Educatioi 

B.M., Hardin-Simmons University 

M.M., No. Texas State College 
GRAHAM, CHARLES G Registra 

B.S.E., University of Central Arkansas 

M.A., Memphis State University 
DOUGLASS, WILEY C Director, Library Learning Resource! 

B.A., Florida State University 

M.A., Appalachian State 

KELLY, JOHN W Director, Data Processing 

WHITMER, DON C Dean, Occupational Studies 

B.S., Iowa State College 

M.A., University of Alabama 
ROGERS, J. BARRY '. Controlle 

A.A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., Florida State University 
EDWARDS, CLAUDE A Director, Physical Plam 

HOLLING, FRED J Director of Continuing Education, Central Campus 

B.S., M.A., University of Florida 
SCHNEIDER, JOSEPH M Director, Personne 

B.B.A., University of Wisconsin 

SMITH, OTTIS R Provost, North Campus 

B.S., William Carey College 
M.Ed., Louisiana State University 
Ed.D., University of Southern Mississippi 



Staff 

lNNER, JAMES W Dean, Instruction & Student Personnel-South 

B.S., M.S., N.W. Missouri State University 
1RGUSON, JESSE E Assistant Registrar 

B.S., Hampton Institute 

M.A., New York University 
)ONTZ, JONATHAN W Director, Information Services 

A.B., High Point College 

M.A., Columbia University 



Professional/Supervisory Personnel 

ELLO, KATHLEEN H Program Specialist 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.A.E., M.Ed., Ed.S., Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
ECK, REBECCA C Home Economics Coordinator 

B.S., M.S., Voc. Ed., Florida International University 
ECTON, SHARVELL Center Registrar, North 

B.S., Hampton Institute 

ERTRAM, HARVEY R '. Supervisor, Security 

ODEN, BRUCE P Supervisor, Grounds & Landscaping 

A.S., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., University of Connecticut 
RANNIGAN, JAMES E Director, Resource Development 

B.S., New York State University at Plattsburgh 

M.S., New York State University at New Paltz 

ROFFT, RUTH E Manager, Bookstore 

JSSELLE, JO Program Specialist 

B.S., East Tennessee State 

M.S., Florida State University 

ASSIDY, EDWARD J Supervisor, Maintenance 

ASSIDY, PAUL A Plant Supervisor, Glades 

DCKRELL, KATHLEEN E Job DeveJopment Specialist 

B.S., Bemidji State University 
JSA, KARLYNN P Accountant 

A.S., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.A., University of South Florida 

ANGIO, JEAN K Supervisor, Payroll 

AVIS, MARVITA Y Accountant/Financial Aid 

B.S., Florida A & M University 
■VQUIR, HAMID Director, Student Financial Aid 

B.S., Florida State University 
LLNER, ALPHONSE E Accountant/Internal Auditor 

B.S., University of Florida 
1ECH, DAVID L Senior Programmer 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 



Staff 

HOWELL, JAMES O Director, Institutional Researc 

B.S., Ball State University 

M.S., George Peabody College 

Ed.D., Ph.D., New Mexico State University 

JACKSON, SOLOMON Manager, Computer Operation 

JOHNSON, ARDEASE G Personnel Representativ 

A.A., St. Petersburg Junior College 

B.A. Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
JONES, RICHARD I Director of Purchasin 

B.S., University of Palm Beach 

KENT, LORAINE T , Supervisor, Print Sho 

KUBINSKI, CHARLES S Supervisor, Securil 

LORE, ABDON Coordinator, Veteran Affair 

A. A., Florida Keys Community College 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
MATSOUKAS, GEORGE E Grants Coordinator/Write 

B.A., Rutgers University 

M.A., University of Iowa 
MCG1RT, HARRIS D Director, Student Services/Sout 

B.S., Lincoln Memorial University 

M.S., University of Tennessee 

Ed.D., Virginia Polytechnic Institute & State University 
MONAS, LESLIE A Center Registrar, Sout 

B.A., Ohio State University 
MOSS, ROBERT C Dean, Student Activitie 

B.A., George Washington University 

M.Ed., University of Florida 

Ed.S., Florida Atlantic University 
MURRAY, DIANA S C.E.L. Teach< 

B.A., Florida International University 

M.A., Nova University 
NELSON, MAUREEN F Coordinator, Continuing Educatio 

B.S.N. , New York State University 

R.N., Mary Immaculate School of Nursing 
ORSENIGO, MARY B Center Registrar, Glade 

B.S., University of Maine 

M.S., Cornell University 

PHAM, CUC-HOA P Senior Programme 

RAUTIO, WALTER K Supervisor, Custodian 

SHEPHERD, DENISE D Senior Systems Analys 

TOWNSEND, JOHN H Coordinator, Continuing Educatio 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
WILSON, PATRICIA A Coordinator, Continuing Educatio 

B.A., Kent State University 

M.R.A., University of San Francisco 
WOOLFE, ELIZABETH A Coordinator, Continuing Educatio 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 

Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
YOUNG, REMER E Manager, Systems & Programmin 

A.S., Palm Beach Junior College 



10 



Staff 

Academic Department 
Chairpersons & Assistants 

IOSWORTH, MARY L Asst. Chairperson, Communications Department 

B.S. Ed., Georgia State College for Women 

M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Miami 
IOTTOSTO, SAMUEL S Chairperson, Social Science Department 

B.S., Columbia University 

M.A., Forman University 

Ed.D., University of Florida 
)ASHER, PAUL J Chairperson, Science Department 

B.S., University of Illinois 

M.A., Ph.D., Indiana University 
)UNCAN, WATSON B., Ill Chairperson, Communications Department 

B.A., M.A., University of South Carolina 
IALE, REUBEN A Chairperson, Art Department 

B.F.A., The Art Institute of Chicago 

M.F.A., Southern Illinois University 
IUTCHINS, HAL C Chairperson, Dental Health Services Department 

B.A., College of Wooster 

D.D.S., Ohio State University 
AacPHERSON, NANCY JANE . Asst. Chairperson, Dental Health Services Department 

R.D.H., West Liberty State College 

B.S., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
flACY, JOSEPH Chairperson, Law Enfprcement Department 

A.A., Palm Beach Junior College 

FBI National Academy 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
/IORGAN, BETTY A Chairperson, Nursing Department 

R.N., B.S., M.S., Indiana University 
AULLINS, THOMAS D Chairperson, Athletics Department 

B.A., M.A., Georgetown College 
IADER, JENNINGS B Chairperson, Engineering Technology Department 

A. A., Pieffer College 

B.A., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers 
REYNOLDS, HOWARD M. . Chairperson, Physical Education Department 

B.A., M.A., Ed.D., University of Kentucky 
JOYCE, LETHA MADGE Chairperson, Music Department 

B.M., M.M., Florida State University 
CHMIEDERER, JOHN M , Coordinator, Allied Health Services 

A.B., Washington University 

M.S., Florida State University 
UTTLE, ROBERT L Chairperson, Business Department 

B.S., University of North Carolina at Charlotte 

M.Ed., Ed.D., University of Georgia 
RAVIS, RICHARD L Asst. Chairperson, Mathematics Department 

B.S., M.S., New York State College 
WING, RUTH W Chairperson, Mathematics Department 

B. A., Westminster College 

M.S., Florida State University 



11 



Faculty 

Faculty 

ADAMS, JOHN F Communications 

B.A., Berry College 

M.A., Auburn University 
ALBEE, D. HUGH Music 

A.B., B.M., M.M., Eastman School of Music, University of Rochester 

D.M., Florida State University 
ALBER, KNUD D Mathematics 

B.S., North Carolina State College 

M.Ed., University of North Carolina 

M.A., Louisiana State University 
ALDRIDGE, JAMES E Science/Biology 

A.A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
ALLRED, ELIZABETH T Science/Biology 

A.B., Keuka College 

M.A., Mount Holyoke College 
ARANT, ODAS E Art 

B.A., M.F.A., Florida State University 
ARCHER, PATRICK Art 

B.A., Principia College 

M.F.A., California College of Arts and Crafts 
ARORA, EASTER T Nursing 

B.S.N., Central Philippines University 
BAILEY, RICHARD R Science/Biology 

B.S., Florida A & M University 

M.S., Fairleigh Dickson University 
BALDREE, WILLIAM G Data Processing 

B.S., University of Illinois 

M.A., Florida Atlantic University 
BARTON, FRANCIS D. . North Campus 

B.S., U.S. Naval Academy 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
BATSON, ROBERT L. JR Business/Accounting 

B.A., Harding College 

M.A., M.Ed., George Peabody College for Teachers 
BECHERER, FLOYD O Social Science 

A.B., M. A., Washington University 
BELL, ROY E Physical Education 

B.S., M.P.E.H., University of Florida 
BENKEN, BARBARA J Nursing 

R.N., B.S., State University College at Plattsburg, N.Y. 
BETZ, VINCENT P Communications 

B.A., Seton Hall University 

M.Ed., University of Florida 
BLANTON, BETTY G. South Center 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.P.E.H., University of Florida 
BLOODWORTH, CAROL J Communications 

B.A., M.A.T., Emory University 



12 



Faculty 



iOOK, ROBERT L Engineering Technology 

B.S.Ed., California State College of Pennsylvania 

M.S., Florida State University 
tOORMAN, VIRGINIA B Nursing 

B.S., Alderson Broaddus 
500RMAN, WILLIAM W Business/Economics 

B.A., San Jose State College 

M.A., Ph.D., Stanford Un Related Health 

B.S.Ed., Temple University 

M.S.W., Ph.D., Florida State University 

BOWSER, KATHLEEN L Center for Early Learning 

B.S., Boston University 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
3RUTON, JAMES L. JR South Center 

B.S., M.A.S.S., Florida A & M University 
3USSELL, JAN S Engineering Technology 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 
3USSELLE, DONALD H Communications 

B.S.E., University of Tampa 

M.S., Florida State University 
3UTLER, CAROL S Science/Biology 

B.S., Duke University 

M.A.T., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
BUTLER, PAUL W Counselor, Student Personnel 

B.S., Ft. Valley State College 

M.A., Fisk University 
AMPBELL, JANETTE H.. Glades Center 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.A., University of Alabama 
AMPBELL, JUDY ANN B Nursing 

R.N., B.S., M.A., University of Florida 

Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
2ARLOS, JOHN B Engineering Technology 

B.E.E., Pratt Institute 
DASE, PAMELA C Counselor, South Center 

B.A., M.A., Florida Atlantic University 
DAYLOR, DANIEL P., JR Science/Biology 

B.S., Indiana University of Pennsylvania 

M.S., Cornell University 
CERAVOLO, JOSEPH J Science/Chemistry 

B.S., Davis & Eikins College 

M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 
COFFIN, JEAN A Nursing 

R.N., Methodist Hospital School of Nursing 

B.S., Butler University 

M.S., University of Chicago 
OLLINS, LAURA R South Center 

A.B., Eastern Kentucky State College 

M.A., University of Kentucky 



13 



* 



Faculty 



CONNOLLY, JOHN M Communications 

B.A., M.A., University of North Dakota 
COOK, DONALD W Counselor, Student Personne 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Florida 
DAMPIER, H. PAYGE Social Science 

B.S.E., M.Ed., University of Cincinnati 
DARCEY, HELEN B Communications 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
DAUGHERTY, L. RAYBURN Social Science 

A. A., Lindsey Wilson Junior College 

B.S., Lincoln Memorial University 

M.S., Indiana University 
DAVIS, DENNIS E Engineering Technology 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., Florida State University 
DAVIS, FRANKIE D Business Education 

B.S., University of Southern Mississippi 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
DICKINSON, SARAH L Communications 

A.B., Florida State University 

M.A., Duke University 
DIEDRICH, HELEN V Counselor, Student Personnel 

R.N. .Wilmington Memorial Hospital 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 
DOOIES, LILLIAN S Law Enforcement 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.P.A., Florida Atlantic University 
DOOLEY, RUTH W Asst. Director of Library Services III, North Campus 

B.S. in L.S., Drexel Institute of Technology 

A.B., Indiana University 
EASTERLING, EDITH F Communications 

A.B., B.S., Mississippi Southern College 

M.A., University of Alabama 
ERICKSONKUTLIK, EMILY E Related Health 

A.S., R.N., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S.N., Florida State University 
EVANS, HOWARD K Mathematics 

B.S., University of Florida 

M.Ed., University of Georgia 

FARMER, CAROL J Science/Chemistry 

B.S., M.S., University of Akron 
FAQUIR, MAQSOOD M Physical Education 

A.A., Lake City Community College 

B.S., M.S., University of West Florida 
FAQUIR, MARY R Nursing 

R.N., B.S., Florida State University 
FAYSSOUX, JACK C, JR Science/Chemistry 

B.S., Memphis State 

M.S., University of Mississippi 



14 



Faculty 



RGUSON, ARDATA B North Campus 

B.A., Bennette College 

M.A., Atlanta University 
RGUSON, GWENDOLYN P Counselor, Student Personnel 

B.S., Florida A & M University 

M.Ed., Ohio University 
LORY, WILLIAM C Communications 

B.A., M.A., University of Florida 
3LEY, KENAN F Mathematics 

B.A., St. Bonaventure University 

M.S., Syracuse University 
DSTER, HAL D., JR Librarian 

A.B., Eton College 

M.Ed., University of North Carolina 
3WLER, ETHEL M Business/Nutrition 

B.S.Ed., M.S., Framingham State College 
*ANKLIN, WALTER A Business Education 

B.S., M.A., George Peabody College for Teachers 
3EEDMAN, ARNOLD M Social Science/History 

B.A., Florida State University 

M.A., Ph.D., University of Florida 
ALBRAITH, WILLIAM B Science/Physical Science 

B.S., Florida Southern College 

M.Ed., University of Florida 
ANS, PHILIP Engineering Technology 

B.G.E., North Carolina State College 
ERALDI, ROBERT. Glades Center 

B.S., University of Tampa 

M.A., Ph.D., University of South Carolina 
ERSTEIN, IRVING J Dental Laboratory Technology 

B.S., Long Island University 

M.A., New York University 
RAHAM, WALKER A Communications 

B.S.Ed., Missouri State Teachers College 

M.A., University of Mississippi 
RAHAM, WILLIAM G • Continuing Education 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.A., University of Florida 
REENE, ADDIE G Communications 

B.S.,Stillman College 

M.Ed., Florida A & M University 
ROSS, IRVING J Music 

B.M.E., Chicago Musical College 

M.M., Northwestern University 
IAMLIN, ALLEN C Mathematics 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., M.S., Florida Atlantic University 
ARDEN, DONNA A Nursing 

R.N., St. Francis Hospital School of Nursing 
ARMES, ELIZABETH D Nursing 

R.N., Rochester General Hospital School of Nursing 



15 



Faculty 



HARRELL, ALMA M Nursin 

A.S., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S.N. , Florida International University 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
HARRELL, FREDDIE L Counselor, Glades Cent* 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
HARTMAN, MAURICE E.. Science/Bioloj 

B.S., Westminster College 

M.A., Indiana University 
HAYES, MARGARET D Nursin 

R.N., B.S., M. of Nursing, University of Florida 
HAYNES, YVONNE A Social Science/Behavioral Scienc 

B.S., Florida A & M University 

M.SW., University of Georgia 
HENDRIX, DANIEL W Mathematii 

B.S., Savannah State College 

M.S., Atlanta University 
HILLIARD, PATRICIA B Science/Bioloi 

B.S., Memphis State University 

M.S., Florida Atlantic University 
HITCHCOCK, PAUL W Mathematii 

B.S., New York State University 

A.M., Bowdoin College 
HOLLOWAY, JOAN H North Campi 

B.A., Harding College 

M.A., George Peabody College 
HOUSER, JAMES C, JR * 

B.A., Florida Southern College 

M.F.A., University of Florida 
HUNEKE, WINIFRED H , Nursir 

R.N., B.S., M.S., University of Pennsylvania 
JEFFERSON, FREDDIE S North Campi 

B.A., Florida A & M University 

M.A., Stetson University 

Ed.S., Florida State University 
JENKINS, JOHN E Counselor, North Campi 

A.A., Volusia Community College 

B.S., M.S., Florida A & M University 
JOHNSON, PATRICIA A Mus 

B.M., B.M.E., M.M., Howard University 
JOHNSTON, H.ALAN North Campi 

B.S., Trinity University 

M.Ed., University of Virginia 

Ph.D., University of Florida 
JONES, JOAN S Communicatior 

B.A., Mexico City College 

A.M., University of Cincinnati 
JONES, ROBERT D Mus 

B.S., West Chester State College 

M. A., University of Connecticut . 



16 



Faculty 



BOWLES, BOBBIE LEE Physical Education 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.S., West Virginia University 
)CHEL, ROSALIND S Social Science 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 
*AMER, GORDON J South Center 

B.A.E., M.Ed., University of Florida 
KIEGER, PETER J South Center 

B.S.E., University of Florida 

M.Ed., Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
*UMM, BYRON C Dental Laboratory Technology 

Franklin University 
WGSTON, MARIE A Mathematics 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., University of Florida 
■AHY, FRANCIS L Communications 

A.B., Morningside College 

M.A., University of South Dakota 
■DBETTER, M. FRANCIS Business Education 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.Ed., University of Florida 
:SKO, JOSEPH M Science/Chemistry 

B.S., M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 

M.S., University of Mississippi 
)NG, RONALD A Counselor, North Campus 

B.A., Anderson College 

M.A., Bail State University 
ARSTELLER, GLEN A North Campus 

B.S., Moravian College 

M.S., Florida State University 
ATTHEWS, BARBARA C Social Science/Psychology 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.A., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 

Ed.D., University of Tennessee 
cCANN, HARRIET S Nursing 

R.N., Cochran School of Nursing 

B.S., M.S., New York University 
cCLAY, ILEANA C Music 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.F.A., Florida Atlantic University 
cCRACKEN, WILLIAM J Science/Biology 

A. A., Okaloosa-Walton Junior College 

B.S., Florida State University 

M.S., Iowa State University 
cCREIGHT, CHARLES R Communications 

B.S., Western Illinois University 

M.Ed., University of Illinois 
cLAUGHLIN, FRANK J Counselor, Student Personnel 

B.S., Youngstown University 

M.A.Ed., Westminster College 



17 



Faculty 



McNEELY, MARIAN C Counselor, South Cente 

A.B., Notre Dame College 

M.Ed., Kent State University 

Ed.D., Nova University 
MEEKER, SYLVIA C Related Heall 

A.B., Smith College 

O.T. Certificate, Columbia College of Physicians and Surgeons 

Reg. O.T., The American Occupational Therapy Assn., Inc. 

M.S., Florida International University 
MELDON, ALFRED W., JR North Campu 

B.A., New York University 

M.A., Columbia University 
MERKLE, EVELYN M Nursin 

A.S., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S.N. , Florida International University 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
MEYER, LOIS O Communication 

B.A., Carthage College 

A.M., University of Illinois 

Ed.S., Florida Atlantic University 
MILLARD, PHILIP W Engineering Technology 

A.S., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., Northeast Missouri State Teachers College 
MOONEY, STAFFORD M South Cente 

B.A., M.A., Xavier University 
MOSES, RONALD L Counselor, Student Personne 

B.S., M.A., Tennessee Tech. University 

MUS T°' AR ™U R E • Communication: 

B.F.A., Carnegie Institute of Technology 

M.A., University of Connecticut 

MYA T T ' E ^ANORJ. Social Scienc, 

A.B., William Smith College 

M.A., Smith College 

OENBRINK,GERALDINE... Dental Hygiem 

A.A., University of Florida 

A.S., Palm Beach Junior College 
PAINTER BERNARD E.. Glades Center 

B.S., Indiana University of Pa. 

M.Ed., Pennsylvania State University 

PAYNE, JOSEPH O Qn ,. |C . 

D » c i • ^ ■■ Social Science 

B.A., Erskme College 

M.Ed., University of North Carolina 
PEREZ, FRANK H r>«mm..„- .'• 

A.B., M.A., University of Miami Communications 

PHILLIPS, JOHN A rroHk .„ t 

B.A., Livingston University " GladeS Cente ' 

M.A.T., University of Montevallo 

Ph.D., University of Southern Mississippi 



18 



Faculty 



RMATTEI, M. HELENE Dental Hygiene 

R.D.H., Forsyth School for Dental Hygienists 

A.S., Northeastern University 
JT, JOHN W., JR Communications 

A.B., Wofford College 

M.A., University of South Carolina 
DLE, NOREEN K Nursing 

R.N., Jefferson Med. College Hospital 

B.S., Wayne State University 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
ENTICE, MAVILENE Home Economics 

B.S., University of Alabama 

M.S., Purdue University 
rWELLER, SEYMOUR Music 

B.Mus.Ed., M.Mus.Ed., Indiana University 
3H, EDWIN V Social Science/History 

B.S.E., Geneva College 

M.A., University of Pittsburgh 
XTZ, CARL F Engineering Technology 

B.S., Stetson University 

M.S., Ohio State University 
WIOS, ARTHUR C Science/Physics, Physical Science 

B.S., M.A., Middle Tennessee State University 
DDES, JACK D Physical Education 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., Florida Southern College 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
HARDSON, MARGARET B Librarian 

B.S., Alabama State College 

M.S. in L.S., Atlanta University 
HMOND, SANDRA S Glades Center 

B.A., M.A.T., Florida Atlantic University 
E, JULIO R Business/Hotel-Food Service 

B.A., University of Richmond 

M.S., Florida State University 
BERTS, BENJAMIN S Librarian 

B.S., Georgetown University 

M.A., Florida State University 
BINSON, TRINETTE W Social Science 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.A., M.A., Florida Atlantic University 
SSAL, BARRY K Glades Center 

B.A., City College of New York 

M.A., University of Wisconsin 

Ph.D., Kent State University 
30NIS-CHAFEE, BARBARA Related Health 

B.S., University of Connecticut 

B.S., Virginia Commonwealth University 

M.A., West Georgia College 



19 



Faculty 



SALISBURY, ELEANOR MAYOCK Social Science/Psychok 

B.M., B.S., Misericordia College 

M.S., Bucknell University 
SAMMONS, H. DOUGLASS Science/Biol< 

A.A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., University of Maryland 

M.S., Florida State University 
SAUNDERS, FRANKLIN F Related He* 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University 

Ph.D., Florida State University 
SCHNEIDER, ARTHUR E Communicatic 

B.A., DePauw University 

M.A., Florida State University 
SEEMAYER, DELORES Related He; 

R.N., Tampa Hospital 

B.S.N. E., M.S., Florida State University 
SHACKELFORD, OSCAR E Law Enforcem 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.A.A., M.P.A., Florida Atlantic University 
SHAW, ROBERT G Mathemal 

B.S., Wake Forest College 

M.Ed., University of North Carolina 
SLATERY, W. PATRICK 

A.B., University of Chattanooga 

M.A., East Tennessee State University 
SMITH, NOEL S. South Cet 

B.S., M.B.A., Florida State University 
SMITH, SUE C Business Educat 

B.S., Bethel College 

M.A., Peabody College 
SMYTHE, JANE M Dental Hygi< 

R.D.H..C.D.A. 

A.S., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.H.S., Florida Atlantic University 

M.S., Voc. Ed., Florida International University 
STECKLER, ANN H Business Administrat 

A.B., Allegheny College 

M.A.T., Florida Atlantic University 
STERLING, JEWEL S Communicati. 

B.A., M.A., North Texas State University 
STILL, MARY J. Mathemal 

A. B. , Trevecca Nazarene College 

M.Ed., Auburn University 
SUKUMARABANDHU, KAMTHORN Science/ChemiJ 

B.S., M.S., University of the Pacific 

Ph.D., University of Cincinnati 
SUTTLE, MILDRED M South Cer 

B.A., Birmingham Southern College 

M.A., University of Alabama 
SWEET, RAYMOND W Mathemat 

B.A., M.A., State College of Iowa 



20 



Faculty 



HUNE, DAN LEE South Center 

B.S., The Defiance College 
M.Ed., The Wright State University 
Ed.D., University of Florida 

MAS, MILTON U Audio Visual Coordinator 

B.S.Ed., State Teachers College, California, Pa. 
M.A.Ed., (AV), Appalachian University 

HEY, CHARLES G Science/Chemistry 

B.S., Murray State College 
M.S., University of Mississippi 

MATH, MAJORIE A Dental Hygiene 

Cortland State University 

R.D.H., Eastmant Dental Dispensary 

B.S., Florida International University 

<, JO M South Center 

B.A., M.A., Florida Atlantic University 
Ph.D., University of Florida 

WYHE, WILLIAM K Mathematics 

B. A., Calvin College 

M.A., Michigan State University 

M.A., University of Oregon 

»E, IDELLA B Librarian 

B.S., Florida A & M University 
M.S.L.S., Atlanta University 

THERLY, JAMES N. JR South Center 

B.S., M.B.A., University of North Carolina 

TEHEAD, SHARON J Dental Assisting 

Certified Dental Assistant 

DOWS, RUTHANNA R Retailing 

B.S., Miami University 
M.S., New York University 

JON, WILLIAM J Communications 

B.S. in Ed., Illinois State University 
M.A., George Peabody College 

HERSPOON, DOROTHY D Communications 

B.S., Paine College 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 

)DS, MARY J Nursing 

A. A., King's College 

B.S., Cornell 

M.S., Rutgers University 

JER, RICHARD E Social Science/Sociology 

B.S., Millersville State College 
M.S., Ph.D., Florida State University 

NG, JOAN C Communications, North Campus 

B.S., M.S., State University of New York 
Ph.D., University of Florida 

HERL, ALICE Asst. Director, Library Services III, Glades Center 

B.S./Ed., Clarion State College 
M.S./LS., University of Pittsburgh 



21 



Faculty 



Part Time Instructors 



Palm Beach Junior College employs qualified part-time instruct 
both for workshops and seminars and for credit courses. In our a 
a large number of outstanding teachers are available for this serv 
and the college takes pride in their credentials and 
complishments. It is difficult, however, to obtain a list for the cat< 
which would be complete and current. The following list, supplie< 
center administrators and, at PBJC Central, by department chairn 
is intended to be representative rather than complete. 



PBJC South 



BENNETT, BRAD 
BENNETT, LEE 
BIROL, SEDAT 
BITTNER, BARBARA 
BROWN, MICHAEL 
BROTHERTON, FRAN 
BUCKLEW, BILL 
COBLENTZ, LINNEA 
COFER, JUDITH 
COLLINS, JOHN 
COLOMBO, CONSTANTINO 
COMAS, LAURA 
CROSS, ARLENE 
CURLESS, WILBUR 
DENS, JOHN PIERRE 
DIAL, STEVEN 
DORST, MARY 
FAUST, DAVID D. 
GANS, PHILIP 
GILL, DR. NEWELL 
GOEBEL, ROBERT 
GRAHAM, WILLIAM 
GREGORY, PETER 
GUERRERA, FRANK 
GUTTMAN, MARTIN 
HOLCOMB.JOAN 
HURLBURT, ROGER 
IVERSON, GRACE 
JEFFERSON, ESTELLE 
JONES, JULIE 
KAHLE, CAROL 
KIZLIK, BOB 
KIZLIK, SANDRA 
LANGSTON, JAMES 



LUCAS, CAROL 
MEYER, JOHN 
MILLER, JANE 
MODDER, PHILIP 
NATHAN, FRIEDA 
OTTO, MARILYN 
PARK, MICHAEL 
PATTON, BARBARA 
RAZNOFF, BEVERLY 
REMUS, JACK 
RESNICK, DR. JACK 
RICE, ROBERT 
ROUNDY, DR. PETER 
SCHIENER.JOHN 
SHENKIN, HUBERT 
SHENKIN, LUCILLE 
SHEPARD, DAVID 
SIGAL, DR. BEV 
SILBERBERG.SAUL 
SMITH, LARRY 
SPINELLA, PATRICIA 
STANTON, DR. MARY 
STONE, DONALD 
SUMMERS, LINDA 
SWANSON, PAUL 
TANNEHILL, ELLEN 
TRASCA, DR. KA 
TSURUTOME, SANDRA 
UPTON, WILLIAM 
VAN PELT, RAYMOND 
WEBB, THEODORE II 
WEIGEL, WILLIAM 
WEISE,JOANNE 



22 



Faculty 



PBJC North 



nIOT.GINETTEJ. 
(ER, MERT P. 
^RETT, DR. WILLIAM 
iRS, MITCHELL J. 
)MBERG,DALER. 
)WN, CHARLES L. 
.LOCK, RUBY 
?NHAM, DAVID 
rtPBELL, CHARLES 
LCOTE, THOMAS 
QUINO, MICHAEL 
: FEY, ALAN 
.BATH, JR., WALTER 
JOVER, LEIGH 
NGIO, JR., ROBERTA. 
MS, MARK H. 
{RY, JOSEPH 
5ANTIS, JOSEPH 
SA,JR.,JOE 
K, BOBBIE 
, DOROTHY 
*DON, KENNETH 
[CO, LOUISE 
rfLIN, MAE 
WARD, GLENN 
.COMB, JOAN F. 
.T, JERRY 

JSMAN.C.P., MICHAEL A. 
.LIHAN, DR. WILLIAM F. 
VAR, FRANK 
<\CE, FRANCIS 
ERFIELD, DR. RONALD 
IANNSEN, CHRIS 
INSON, MARGUERITE 
INSON, LOUIS 
CE, D.JANE 
IA, SISTER GWEN 
SCHER, BARRY 
)LL, KATHLEEN 
)WIG, DONNA 
;DONALD, MICHAEL A. 
MDIGO, MELINDA 
MN, DR. MAYBELLE 
RBAN, DR. JORGE 



MARTIN, CAROLYN L 
McCLAIN, MARY ANN 
MENDELSON, DR. MEL 
MIALE, DR. JOSEPH 
MILLER, BONNIE 
MILLER, SAMUEL 
MONTGOMERY, THOMAS 
MOSSADEGHI, FRANKS. 
MOSTAD, CAROL 
MUNN, JANET 
NEAL, MICKEY 
NEAL, DR. VIRGINIA 
OCCHIPINTI.JOHN 
ORRIS, PATRICIA 
PICKETT, DONALD A. 
PITTARD, JR., JAMES B. 
RICHMOND, D.GARY 
ROBINS, ELLIS 
ROBINSON, JR., ISAAC 
ROTANDO, MICHAEL A. 
RUDY, ROBERT L 
SABO, DR. JOHN 
SALINGER, RUTHANN 
SCAMBLER, GLENN A. 
SCHOOLEY, DONNA 
SCHRAM, ROGER 
SCHWARTZ, LYNN R. 
SHALHOUB, ROBERT M.W. 
SHEA, LUCILLE M. 
SHERMAN, SAMUEL 
SHETLER, CAROLE 
SHOULTES, TERRY W. 
SIGAL, DR. BEVE 
TAYLOR, DENNIS J. 
THOMASSON, GARY D. 
WHITE, CHARLES E. 
WILKOFF, ROBERT E. 
WILLIAMS, ARCH C. 
WITHERS, FRANK K. 
WITTBOLD, GEORGE H. 
WONNELL, THOMAS 
WOODS, FRANKLIN C. 
ZELENKA, LINDA 



23 



Faculty 



PBJC Glades 



BASS, FREDERICK 
BENNETT, ROBERT 
BENNETT, SARAH 
BLUMBERG, DR. HARRIS 
BOTTOMS, JANICE 
BROWN, W.R. 
CAMPBELL, DAVID 
EVANS, DAVID T. 
GOODLETT, C. DAVID 
HARVIN, REMAR 
KELLEY, JAMES 
KIRBY.ANN 
KONEN, ELIZABETH 
LEMONS, HARVEY 
LOCKMILLER, CHARLES 
LUTZ, BRENDA 
MacPHAIL, ALLAN 
McCOY, RICHARDINE 
MILLER, HARMA 
MILLER, MICHAEL D. 
MILLER, VICKI 
PAYNE, ROBERT 



AUSTIS, JAMES H. 
BEAN, ROBERT 
BLOMBERG, DALE 
BOND, CRAIG 
BRUCE, OWEN 
CATO, MICHAEL 
CAVANAUGH, WILLIAM 
CHALAIRE, DONALD 
CHURCH, GERALD 
COOPER, JAMES 
COULTER, CARLTON III 
FRECK, DAVID 
GIMPLE, NORMAN 

ALLEN, RUTH 
BLOESER, ELIZABETH 
BUCKNER, MICHAEL 
CAMPBELL, CHARLES 
CANTLEY.GWENETH 
CEARLEY, CALVIN 
CONNORS, EDITH 
CROW, PORTER 
CUTIE, EDWARD 
DAVIS, MARK 
EL-ROUSSE, LKJDMYLA 
FLUTY, FRED 
GAUNT, DORIS 
GOSMAN, H. BRUCE 
HAYES, JAMES JR. 



PIERSON, THOMAS 
REPLOGLE, ROBERT 
RAHI, DR.G.S. 
RICHMOND, D.GARY 
RUSSAL, PHYLLIS 
SCHWANDES, LARRY 
SHAFER, MARGARET 
SHEARIN, DR. NORMAN 
SHEPARD, WILLIAM M. 
SKINNER, JOSEPH 
SPOONER, DAVID 
STEPHENS, EDNA 
STEVENS, FREDERICK 
TANKERSLEY, DONALD 
TAYLOR, CHARLES 
TULLOS, JACQUELINE 
VANDERPOOL.GERVIN 
WALKER, DOROTHY 
WARD, JIMMY B. 
WILLIAMS, LEROY 
ZERVOS, CELESTE 



PBJC Central 
Engineering 

HEYBRUCK, WILLIAM 
HINCKLEY, LEONARD 
KELLY, JOHN III 
LANG, MARGARET 
McCUE, MICHAEL 
MOLZER, RICHARD 
MAYO, WAYLAND 
SCHNEIDER, GEORGE 
SHEPHERD, DENISE 
TYDINGS, WILLIAM 
TYNDALL, HUGH 
WILKINS, WILLIAM 

Business 

HENDERSON, JOSEPH 
JONES, DAVID 
KOEHLER, HARRY 
LEWTER, DENNIS 
LLEWELLYN, PAUL 
MARTIN, JOHN 
PITTARD, JAMES 
RENNARD, BEVERLY 
ROBINSON, JESSE 
RUKIN, ROGER 
SCHUH, LYNDA 
SELBY, MARIE 
SIBLEY, RUTH 
SIGAL, BEVE 
SILVA, LOUIS 



24 



Faculty 



business (Cont'd.) 

5PENGLER, JOYCE 
TANTLINGER, FRANK 
/VALSH, BARBARA 
VHITAKER.JOHN 
[ACHARY, JOSEPH 

Art 

MHO, PAUL 

30RODYCHUCK, ANITA 
)E HAYS, HOTTIS 
3REGORY, CONNIE 
3ROSS, RAY 

(inney, edward 
McCartney, dr. tom 
worphey, bob 
/iadigan, cara 
shearer, marty 

ommunications 

HJXBURY, ALICE 
K)TANDO, MICHAEL 

Criminal Justice 

HARRISON, JUDGE HOWARD 
.ENTINI,CAPT. RONALD 
INTACUDA.JAY 

)ental Health 

kLPERIN, DR.JAY 
JOYER, DR. FRANKLIN 
iGlTTO, DR. JOHN 
HOLT, DR. ROBERT 
URKPATRICK,SUE 

LEIN,DR. PAUL 
/IURRAY, PAULETTE 
K3SHKIND, DR. DAVID 

OLLEY, DR. LEONARD, JR. 

ENEZIA, DR. RICHARD 
'OLSTAD, DR. KENNETH 
VRIGHT, DR. CHARLES 

.ibrary 

WAN, NANCY 

Mathematics 

URGESS, DR. ERNEST 

OEBEL, ROBERT 
<ESSLER, MARK 
VIIGHDOLL, NANCY 
TEDCASTLE, SHARON 
THOMASSON, GARY 

HAPIRO,JACK 

HERMAN, SAMUEL 



Music 

BUTTERWORTH, DR. DONALD 
DREVET, PHILIPPE 
KEITH, ANNA 
MILLER, BETTY 

Nursing 

DUNSON, PRISCILLA 
MIDDLETON, DEBBIE 
WILLIAMS, JOYCE 

Physical Education 

CAMPBELL, KATHY 
LEE, ANNETTE 
MANDIGO, MELINDA 

Related Health 

CARTER, KEVIN R. 
DOODY, LAURA 
HAKUCHA, DR. MICHAEL 
HORTON, CATHERINE 
HUGGINS, LINDA 
HUSE, MARY 
NAYLOR, MARY 
NEVES, BETTY 
NICKERSON,SALLIE 
PROVAN, BARBARA 
SCHMUKER, DEBORA 

Science 

HYMAN, JEROME 
McGEE.DR.JOE 
PETROS, LARBEEW. 
PLAGER, EDITH 
ROBINSON, PATRICIA A. 
ROUSH, DR. BENJAMIN 
TATE, ANN C. 
WALESKY, RICHARD E. 
WARNER, DR. PATRICIA 
WOOD, DR. JAMES III 

Social Science 

MACK, LARRY 
MEYER, DR. JOHN 
SCULLY, LYNN 
SILBERMAN, DR. MORRIS 
STANTON, DR. MARY 
WIEDERHOLD, DR. ALBERT 
ZUCKER, SCOTT 



25 



Staff 



Confidential Personnel 



BEALL, MARY K. 
BRADBURY, RUTH B. 
CARLISLE, ALICE P. 
CHILDERS, BETTY L 
CLARK, THOMAS A. 
HOUSE, JANICE E. 
HOWARD, STEVEN C. 
JACKSON, SOLOMON 
JOHNSON, ANITA 
JONES, LEVERNE 
KHOURY, RENEL. 

Classified 

ABEL, BARBARA M. 
ALBER, USE I. 
ANDERSON, GLADYS J. 
ANDERSON, JOHN W. 
AUCHTERLONIE, HELEN 
BARBONE, CHERYL 
BARTELS, BARBARA J. 
BASS, CARL L 
BATTLE, ELEANOR A. 
BEATON, JOAN 
BECTON,SHARVELL 
BELLEMAN, BARBARA 
BENN, STANLEY C. 
BERGER, EVE 
BISKUPIAK, NANCY A. 
BLOETH, MICHAEL 
BOLLON, FRANK R. 
BOMGARDNER, GEORGE R. 
BOYLE, MARIE B. 
BRAEUNIG, BARBARA A. 
BRINDLE, DAVID H. 
BROWN, CAROLYN 
BROWN, PENELOPE P. 
BROWN.WADEJR.il 
BUHL, NANCY A. 
BUNTIN.JOHNW. 
BURDEN, JAN 
CAMPBELL, METAC. 
CANNON, MARY L, LP.N. 
CARROLL, DEBRA 
CARROLL, MARJORY R. 
CASSIDY, SUSAN 
CATES, JOYCE 
CHARLES, JANET G. 
CHOATE, BARBARA 
CLARK, BARBARA 
CLOSI, PETER 
COLLETT.JOHN 
COLLETT, RONALD L. 



KUSCHEL, HELEN 
MATTSON.SONIAM. 
MILLER, KATHY 
MONTAGNINO, MONICA 
REDDY, MARIE J. 
SANDERS, BETTY J. 
SCHMIDT, BETTY J. 
SMITH, SARA C. 
THORNTON, SALLE F. 
VAZQUEZ, MARILYN C. 
WILKERSON, JAMES T. 
YORK, LINDLEY F. 

Personnel 

COMBEST, RUBYE. 
CONEY, JOHN 
CONTI, LORE R. 
COPELAND, CAROLYN 
CORNER, GERALDINE 
CORSARO, WILLIAM L. 
CUNNINGHAM, AUDREY 
DALTON, LAURA J. 
DAVIS, PAUL L 
DECKER, RICHARD 
DELORME.GAYLER. 
DE ROCHEMONT, TERESA 
DONALD, RICKY 
DOWLING, ESSIE L 
DURRENCE.CATHERNJ. 
DWYER, SUSAN J. 
ELDITTION, SUSIE M. 
FINTON, LLOYD L. 
FOOTE, DIANA L. 
FOSTER, HELEN 
FOUSE, ISABELLEA. 
FRAWLEY, BARBARA G. 
FRAZIER, SUE 
GARVEY, ROBERT E. 
GIBSON, MARTHA 
GIEL, MARY ANN 
GIVEN, JOHN F. 
GOLDSTEIN, NORMAN L 
GOLDSTEIN, ROBERT L 
GREENE, PATRICIA A. 
GULEFF, PATRICIA 
HAMILTON, MARY 
HANEBERG,JOAN 
HANSON, CAROL V. 
HARLEY.SAMUL 
HARRIS, GERALDINE C. 
HAYES, WILLIAM C. 
HAYNES, LLOYD D. 
HEBERT, MADLYNA. 
HERNDON, BARBARA 



26 



Staff 



HICKS, CLARA 
HOLLIS, GLORIA J. 
HUBBLE, BETTY J. 
HUTCHINS, JAMES W. 
JEFFERSON, PENELOPE P. 
JESSELL, NANCY 
JONES, LEVERNEA. 
KENT, LORAINE 
KIGER,ANNAM. 
KIRKHART, JACOB L 
KLEIN, SHIRLEY 
KNIGHT, BENJAMINS. 
KUNSMAN, MARGARET E. 
LACEY, BETTY T. 
LADY, BOBBIE 
LAFFERTY, RUTH P. 
LANCASTER, ALICIA 
LARAWAY, OLGA F. 
LAROCHE, CHRISTOPHER 
LEALAND, CLEODIS 
LESTER, YUORA 
LINN, BETTY J. 
MANNIN.J. MITCHEL 
MARKWOOD, MARY A. 
MARUSZAK, FRANKS. 
McCONNELL, K. ROBERT 
McCRAE, BARBARA 

Mcdonough, louise i. 

McGHIE.JOHND. 
McKENNA, JESSIE O. 
MEADOWS, HAROLD L. 
MEYERS, BETSY B. 
MILLER, LILLIE 
MOONEY, RHEA 
MONTAGNINO, MARIE 
MURDOCK.OPALC. 
MYERS, WILLIAM 
NAVARRO, MARITZA 
NEWMAN, JUDITH E. 
NEWKIRK, KAYF. 
NIESZ, MILDRED E. 
O'NEIL, KATHYW. 
OPALIO, LEONAA. 
OWENS, CALLIEJ. 
PARKER, SHARON P. 
PEARSALL, DONALD V. 
PENNINGTON, ANN L 
PLAGER, EDITH M. 



PODRAZA, CHESTER F. 
PRIEST, CAROL J. 
RANDOLPH, JAMES A. 
RATHBUN, HEIDI 
RAUTIO, OLLI K. 
REASNER, MARY ANN J. 
REES, DOROTHY E. 
RICCIARDI, E.ANTONI 
RICHARDS, DOROTHY 
RIGBY, SUSAN 
RIOS, C. IRIS 
ROBERTS, FREDA M. 
ROBERTS, MARIE C. 
ROGERS, CHRISTINE M. 
ROTH, DANA 
SCHUETTE, DIANE 
SHEA, KENNETH W. 
SHIREY.JEAN 
SMARDIN.TOBY 
SMITH, ROSWITHA M. 
SMITH, WILLIE REE 
SOULE, JAMES D. 
SOUTHARD, MARION W. 
SPRAGUE, MARION L 
STEWART, LINDA 
SZABO, STEVE 
TACEY.JEANM. 
TANGUAY, M. RITA 
TATMAN, MARLA L 
TAYLOR, MARY ELLEN 
THOMPSON, JOHN 
THORNTON, SALLE 
TIDDENS.ARLENE 
TINGLER, MARYL 
TOLMIE, WILLIAM 
TOUGAS, PERRY 
TRUTT, JEANNE A. 
ULBRICHT, DONALD E. 
VERK.JUNE 
WALSH, MARY ANN 
WARNE, NANCY J. 
WEBB, ARTHUR M. 
WILLIAMS, GARY 
WILSON, KITTIEL 
WITHROW, LINDA K. 
WOJIECHOWSKI, MARILYN 
WOODRICK, STEPHEN L 



27 



Faculty 



Emeritus Faculty-Administration 



ACKERMAN, KENNETH E Science/Chemistry 1960-80 

B.S., Baldwin-Wallace 

M.A., Western Reserve University 
ALBERTSON, MARY SUSAN Chairperson, Biology Department 1933-63 

B.S., Cornell University 

M.A., Columbia University 
ALLISON, PAUL W Assistant Dean of Academic Affairs 1958-74 

A.B., St. Lawrence University 

M.B.A., Harvard University 
AUSTIN, LEON F Electronics 1963-76 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 
BAKER, HOWARD Biology 1958-69 

B.S., M.S., Kansas State Teachers College 
BAUGHER, JAMES Financial Officer 1957-59 

B.S., Indiana University Director of Business Affairs 1959-69 

M.Ed., University of Florida 
BENEDICT, DEAN G Dental Assisting 1966-80 

B.S.Ed., Ohio Northern University 

D.D.S., Ohio State University 
BULLOCK, RUBY L Mathematics 1965-78 

A.B., Florida A & M University 

M.A., University of Chicago 

M.A., University of Maine 
BUTTERFIELD, LEE E Chairperson, Foreign Language Dept. 1963-74 

A.B., H.L.D., Hillsdale College 

M.A., McGill University 
BUTTERWORTH, DONALD Q Music 1964-78 

B.M., M.M., Eastern School of Music 

Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University 
CONNELL, CHARLES K Engineering 1964-75 

A. A., Palm Beach Junior College 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 
CONNELLY, OLGA Communications 1965-77 

B.S.E., Pennsylvania State Teachers College 

M.A., University of Michigan 
COOPER, JAMES A Electronics 1960-77 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

B.S., M.S., U.S. Naval Post Graduate School 
D'ANGIO, ROBERT A Social Science 1968 73 

B.A., M.A., Stetson University Director of Continuing Education, 1973-79 

North Campus 
DAVEY, ELIZABETH Y Dean of Women, Counselor 1965-79 

B.S., Douglass College, Rutgers University 

M.S., Barry College 
DAVIES, SIDNEY H Social Science 1962-72 

A.B., Oglethorpe University 

B.D., M. of Div., Vanderbilt University 

S.T.M., S.T.D., Temple University 
DIXON, ELEANOR R Business Education 1961-72 

A.B., M.A., University of Kentucky 



28 



Faculty 

EBERT, REUBEN Mathematics 1965-67 

B.Ed., Illinois State Normal University 

M.A., Columbia University 

Ph.D., New York University 
ENGEL, THEODORE B Chairperson, Dept. of Dental Health Services 1962-72 

D.M.D., University of Pittsburgh 
FORSHAY, DAVID A Social Sciences 1955-73 

A.B., Florida Southern College 

M.Ed., University of Florida 
GATHMAN, CRAIG A Biology 1948-52, 1955-76 

B.S., Alfred University Chairperson, 1964-70 

M.S., University of Miami 
GHIOTO, BANNA I Nursing 1974-79 

R.N., Memorial School of Nursing 

B.S., University of Michigan 

M.S., University of Maryland 
GLYNN, PAUL J Vice President, Student Affairs 1949-78 

B.S., New Jersey State College 

M.A., Montclair State College 
GRAY, JOSEPHINE M Art 1964-78 

B.A., William Penn College 

M.A., Teachers College, Columbia University 
GROSS, IMOGENE A Chemistry, Physics 1933-56 

B.S., Georgia State College for Women 

M.A., Johns-Hopkins University 
HAKUCHA, MICHAEL Assistant Chairperson, Dental Hygiene 1965-76 

B.S., D.D.S., University of Pittsburgh 
HALL, EDITH F Business/Home Economics 1949-79 

B.S., M.S., Florida State University 
HERMAN, DOROTHY PEED English 1960-69 

B.S., Tufts University 

M.A., Florida State University 
HINCKLEY, LEONARD Engineering 1965-75 

B.S., M.E., North Carolina State 

M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
HOLZMAN, ROBERT C Business 1965-68 

B.A., Colgate University Chairperson, Business Department 1968-76 

M.Ed., University of Miami 
HUBER, EARL B Chairperson, Basic Studies Department 1961-74 

A.B., M.A., Western Kentucky State College 
JENSEN, NINA K Chairperson, Art Department 1948-64 

B.S., M.A., Diploma of Fine Arts, Columbia University 
KNITTLE, CARL T Communications 1966-79 

B.A., North Central College, Naperville 

B.D., Yale University 

M.A., Ohio State University 
LEGGITT, DOROTHY Basic Studies 1965-73 

Ph.B., M.A., University of Chicago 

L.H.D., University of Illinois 
MACKENZIE, C. CATHARINE Nursing 1960-70 

R.N., B.S., University of Pennsylvania 

M.A., Columbia University 
MANOR, HAROLD C , President 1957-78 

B.P.S.M., M.A., Ed.D., Indiana University 

29 



Faculty 

MARTIN, JOHN W Business Administration 1966-70 

A.B., University of Florida 

M.A., Stetson University 
MAYFIELD, LAURENCE H Guidance, Registrar 1958-75 

B.S., M.S., Kansas State College 
MCALILEY, CHARLES C Business 1969-81 

B.S., Georgia Institute of Technology 

B.S.B.A., J.D., University of Florida 

MCCUE, MICHAEL J Engineering 1966-75 

University of Michigan 
METTS, PATRICIA M Nursing 1972-81 

R.N., Massachusetts General Hospital 

B.S., University of Miami 

M.P.H., University of Michigan at Ann Arbor 

Ed.D., Florida Atlantic University 
MILES, JAMES B Art 1963-67 

M.Ed., Ed.D., North Texas State University Chairperson, Art Department 1970-80 
MORSE, MARIAN F Psychology, Social Studies 1934-55 

A.B., Smith College 

M.A., Florida State University 
OKERSTROM, THELMA C Business Education 1955-68 

A.B., Marshall College 

M.Ed., University of Pittsburgh 
O'NEILL, JOHN L Social Science 1969-80 

B.A., George Washington University 

M.A., University of Southern California, L.A. N 

M.A.T., University of Florida 
PHILLIPS, EMMA J English 1958-70 

A.B., A.M., Ph.D., Indiana University 
ROYALL, WALTER H Data Processing 1965-76 

B.A., McMaster University 
SAILE, MARCIA C. Mathematics 1957-58, 1965-77 

A.B., Houghton College 

M.A., University of Michigan 
SCHILD, MILDRED M Mathematics 1964-76 

A.B., Florida State University 

M.A., University of North Carolina 
SMILEY, LILLIAN Chairperson, Nursing Department, 1959-69 

R.N., Washington University School of Nursing 

B.S., M.A., Columbia University 
SMITH, RICHARD M Art 1969-80 

B.A., University of Missouri 

M.A., Washington University 

TRICHLER, JAMES R Dental Laboratory Technology 1965-79 

C.D.T. 
TRUCHELUT, GEORGE B Chemistry 1976-78 

A.B., M.S., Emory University Chairperson, Chemistry Department 1968-76 

Ph.D., Texas A & M University 

TUTTLE, LAWRENCE D Chairperson, Law Enforcement Department 1970-79 

A.A., George Washington University Social Science 1966-70 

B.S., M.Ed., Florida Atlantic University 
WARNER, LEON B Guidance 1963-75 

A.B., Union College 

M.Ed., University of Rochester 

30 









HISTORY 

PBJC DISTRICT . . 

STUDENT AFFAIRS AND SERVICES. 



Faim Beach 
Junior College 

NEXT RI6HT 




For most people, the words "Palm Beach Junior College" mayj 
bring to mind a scene at PBJC Central, like the one on the preceding; 
page, or the new signs at exit 47 of Interstate 95, just one mile eas^ 
of the Central Campus. 

But to slightly more than onei 
third of the students at PJBC lasl 
year, scenes of PBJC Central recall 
only a place they might have 
visited once or twice, or perhaps 
where they took one or two 
classes. To them, PBJC is PBJC 
North, PBJC Glades or PBJC 
South. 

As an example, of the 13,458 
students enrolled on March 3j 
1981, 8,909 were at PBJC Central] 
1,385 at PBJC North, 749 at PBJC 






lades, 1,625 at PJBC South, with others at more than one campus. 

It is believed that the potential for growth at both PBJC North 
id South will result, in time, in student body populations reaching 
ie current levels of PBJC Central. PBJC Glades is becoming an im- 
ortant part of the life of our Glades farming communities, and it 
ill be even more important in the future. 

It is understood, of course, that the main things happening on 
II PBJC campuses involve classwork, study and extra-curricular 
tudent activities, but in the last year, significant events occurred in 
le life of the developing physical plant on each of our four cam- 
uses. 




33 



At PBJC North, the news 
will be the opening of the 
first buildings on our per- 
manent campus sometime 
during the year covered by 
this bulletin, probably in 
the early months of 1982. 
The beautiful, 108 acre site 
on PGA Boulevard will be 
developed as rapidly as 
funds permit. Our first 
units are general purpose 
classrooms, necessary ad- 
ministrative offices and a 
small utilities building. 






The news at PBJC Glades will be 
the grand opening of our 
auditorium, the first such building 
in the history of the Glades area. 
This event, probably in October, 
1981, will mark the beginning of a 
new era of community service to 
the people in the western part of 
Palm Beach County. 






To date, PBJC South has existed 
because of the magnificent 
cooperation of our sister institu- 
tion, Florida Atlantic University. 
That cooperation has now ex- 
tended to the dedication of a 10 
acre tract at FAU, (with 33 more 
acres in reserve), for a PBJC 
campus. One of the highest 
priorities at the college these 
days is the search for funding 
from private or public sources 
for our own buildings at the FAU 
campus in Boca Raton. The 
potential for service to students 
of south Palm Beach County is 
very large, and the need for our 
own buildings grows each year. 





36 




At PBJC Central, the facility 
news was not about new build- 
ings, but about a major facelift. 
County voters have already ap- 
proved a one-half mill levy for 
two years only for renovation, 
repair and equipment, and this 
effort is already well underway. 
New roofs, new elevators and 
ramps for the handicapped, new 
labs, an expanded and rebuilt 
auditorium and hundreds of 
other projects will be going on 
during the year covered by this 
bulletin. 





History 

History 

Palm Beach Junior College came into being in West Palm Beach 
1933 as the result of a number of conferences of civic leaders, led 
Joe Youngblood, County Superintendent of Public Schools, an 
Howell L Watkins, principal of Palm Beach High School. It was, fro 
the beginning, a co-educational, day-student junior college, with i 
primary emphasis on preparation for upper division work in college 
and universities. 

For its first 15 years, the college scheduled classes at Palm Beac 
High School. 

In February, 1948, under the leadership of its first president, Dr. Jor 
I. Leonard, (Mr. Watkins headed the college as Dean for 15 years,) tr 
college moved to a 21-acre site at Morrison Field, then a deactivate 
World War II Air Force Base, and now Palm Beach Internation 
Airport. In 1951, reactivation of the base for the Korean Conflii 
forced the college to move to the Town Hall at Lake Park, where 
carried on a curtailed program in cramped quarters for five years. 

The Palm Beach County Commission donated the present 114-aci 
site of the college in 1956, and the state legislature voted $1,047,0C 
for buildings. The college had found its first permanent campus. 

Two years later, Dr. Leonard retired, and the college came under t\ 
direction of Dr. Harold C. Manor. Under his leadership, an era of rap 
and sound growth in number of students and faculty, number ar 
variety of course offerings and general service to the communi 
brought PBJC from a small junior college of less than 500 studen 
when it moved into its permanent campus, to over 8,000 studen 
during Fall and Winter Terms. The college continued ar 
strengthened its excellent academic reputation, but at the same tin 
developed many specialized, business, technical, professional ar 
occupational courses designed to be completed in one or two years 

In 1965, students and faculty of Roosevelt Junior College, a publ 
junior college for black students located in West Palm Beach, wei 
integrated into Palm Beach Junior College. 



38 



History 

)n July 1, 1968, the college, which had been legally governed since 
:s first days by the Palm Beach County Board of Public Instruction, 
ame under the legal custodianship of the Palm Beach Junior 
lollege District Board of Trustees. 

i 1978, after 21 years of outstanding leadership, Dr. Manor, PBJC's 
econd president retired. Dr. Edward M. Eissey, a former student, 
ecame its third president. The college now serves over 10,000 
tudents in Fall and Winter Terms. The unduplicated student count 
Dr all courses, workshops and seminars has reached 25,000 per year. 

igorous expansion of education for senior citizens, now defined as 
lose over 62 years of age, a new Weekend College, the addition of 
ourses by newspaper and TV, closer cooperation with industry and 
ther innovations account for much of the increase in student 
umbers since Dr. Eissey became president. 

he college is now organized into four centers in varying stages of 
evelopment, described under the next major heading, "Palm Beach 
unior College District." Groundbreaking for the new campus of 
BJC North took place on July 26, 1980. 

rom its inception the college has been maintained by public funds, 
nd holds the distinction of being the first public junior college in 
lorida. In December 1947, it became the first junior college in 
lorida to be supported by funds from the state level. 

s graduates have achieved many distinctions. It is noteworthy that 
ie first two men to head the Division of Community Colleges for the 
tate Department of Education were both Palm Beach Junior College 
raduates: Dr. James L Wattenbarger and Dr. Lee G. Henderson. 



Philosophy 

ealizing that there is an ever increasing demand for post high 
chool training at the college level and knowing that many of its area 
itizens without a community centered college might be denied the 
pportunity of pursuing their various educational goals, Palm Beach 
unior College is dedicated to providing its students with high 
uality education at a minimum cost for the benefit of the individual, 
f the nation, and of society in its efforts to achieve its hope for the 
jture. 



39 



Purposes 

Purposes 

In implementing its philosophy, the College has several specific an< 
particular purposes: 

A. The College endeavors to provide the needed curricula ii 
four general areas of instruction. 

1. It seeks to carry on a program for the student wh< 
wishes to continue his studies beyond the two-yea 
program. 

a. It provides the first two years of college instructioi 
for most of the academic schools and colleges if 
universities and other four-year institutions. 

b. It provides pre-professional studies for admission t< 
professional schools. 

2. It has a program of general studies directed at tin 
production of well-informed, competent citizens whc 
can function effectively as members of a family, 
community, a state and democratic nation — a progran 
that serves both social and individual needs. 

3. It offers a program of specialized curricula designee 
primarily to prepare the student to find entrance em 
ployment in a specific occupation, semi-profession 
profession. This program may include liberal arts stud} 
to aid him in gaining civic competence and persona 
adequacy. 

4. It keeps in touch with the community and the people i 
serves, noting changes and trends of development anc 
seeks to meet the educational and cultural needs of the 
area — through the development of community service 
programs. 

B. Among the several desirable qualities the college seeks tc 
promote in its students are: 

1. Qualities of maturity, leadership and ability to par 
ticipate in group efforts. 

2. Desirable ethical, moral and esthetic values, attitudes 
and sensitivities. 

3. Knowledge, skills and social and intellectual com 
petencies. 

4. Responsible, proficient and informed principles <£ 
citizenship. 

5. Awareness of the need for self-discipline as bein( 
fundamental both to academic excellence and tc 
achievement in any serious endeavor. 



40 



Accreditation 



Accreditation 



ilm Beach Junior College is accredited by the Southern 
jsociation of Colleges and Schools and the State Department of 
lucation. The college is an active member of the American 
jsociation of Junior Colleges, the Florida Association of Public 
nior Colleges, the Florida Association of Collegiate Registrars and 
imissions Officers. 

Jmission to the upper division of the state universities and to vir- 
ally all other colleges and universities in the United States is 
anted upon the satisfactory completion of two years University 
irallel work at Palm Beach Junior College. 

xreditation has also been granted by professional organizations 
certain specific programs. This professional accreditation is 
>ted in the catalog on pages where the program is outlined. The 
sence of such a notation indicates that professional accreditation 
is neither been sought nor granted. 



Evening Classes 

ening classes at Palm Beach Junior College not only serve as an extension of the 
y program, but seek to meet the educational and cultural needs of the larger adult 
mmunity. Many credit and non-credit courses are offered in the evening, and most 
liege support services, including library, bookstore, counseling, and selected 
jdent activities, are available to evening students. 

)st classes meet one night a week; a few meet two nights a week. Credit courses 
jy be taken on a non-credit (audit) basis. Adults 18 years or older may audit courses 
thout having graduated from high school. Applications may be filed at the time of 
jistration. 



PBJC Foundation, Inc. 



ie Palm Beach Junior College Foundation, Inc., is a private, non-profit corporation 
lich supports the activities of the College and the community. It is administered by 
Executive Director and has a governing board of outstanding citizens of Palm 
jach County. It develops and operates programs, seminars, conventions and other 
tivities that provide direct service to the College and the citizens of the county. The 
>undation works in conjunction with various individuals and agencies within the 
immunities served by the college. 

»e Foundation is working to develop an active alumni organization that will be 
sponsive to the needs of the College. The Foundation also sponsors the President's 
ub and conducts an annual drive. The Foundation and the Office of Resource 
jvelopment work under the same administrative supervisor and have the same 
immon goals. 



41 



PBJC District 

Palm Beach 
Junior College District 

The entire Palm Beach Junior College District, (Palm Beach Countj 
is considered by the board of Trustees to be the campus of tfi 
college. Attendance Centers, in different parts of the county, and 
different stages of development, serve the citizens of teh area whei 
they are located. Central administration and full facilities for 
courses offered by the college are at the Central Campus at Laj 
Worth. 

Palm Beach Junior College — Central 

The Central Campus is located on 114 acres of the table-top flat land of south Florid 
sloping gently south and east from the intersection of Lake Worth Road and Congrei 
Avenue to the shores of Lake Osborne, west of the city of Lake Worth. 

Under development since 1956, the campus now consists of 25 buildings, (plus] 
minus three or four depending on what is considered to be a separate "building"), wj 
a book value of more than $8 million. Replacement value would be much higher. 

Covered walkways connect all except three of the one, two and three-story classrod 
buildings. Plans are underway to make all programs accessible to handicappj 
students. 

The Central Campus is being built to a designed capacity of 5,000 full-time studenj 
and student enrollment levels are now approaching that number. 

Satellite attendance centers are operated when needed at 14 different locations in tj 
east-central part of the PBJC District. 

Mailing address of the Central Campus is Palm Beach Junior College, 4200 Congrej 
Avenue, Lake Worth, Florida 33461 . The telephone number is 305/439-8000. 

Palm Beach Junior College — Glades 

Palm Beach Junior College Glades was established in 1972. It opened the doors of | 
new campus in the Winter Term, 1977-78. 

PBJC Glades has two modern buildings on its 40-acre campus. Facilities include 
classrooms, laboratories, a library-learning resources center, and administrative ar 
faculty offices. All general education classes are taught on campus as well as] 
comprehensive business program for vocationally oriented students. Classes a 
offered at the Glades Correctional Institution. 

The Palm Beach County Coordinating Council has designated Palm Beach Jund 
College Glades as the agency to offer vocational education in office skills instead j 
the West Area Vocational Technical Center. 

Inquiries specifically involving attendance at the Glades Campus should be addressd 
to: 

Provost, Glades Campus 

Palm Beach Junior College 

1977 College Drive 

Belle Glade, Florida 33430 

Telephone: 305/996-3055 

West Palm Beach telephone: 

305/439-8160 



42 



PBJC District 





Palm Beach Junior College — South 

ough the cooperation of Florida Atlantic University, Palm Beach Junior College has 
i use of the Alexander D. Henderson University School, adjacent to the FAU campus, 
er 4 p.m., and the use of University classrooms for day classes. 

isses at Palm Beach Junior College South are administered through the Dean of 
itruction and Student Personnel and his staff, who have office space at the Hen- 
son School, and college owned mobile offices. 

operative programs in Science and Engineering, utilizing dual enrollment in PBJC 
d FAU, offer a four-year baccalaureate program on one campus. 

Im Beach Junior College South offers its students a wide variety of curricula. 

Palm Beach Junior College South courses are offered on the FAU campus and 
ike full use of the University's excellent facilities. 

tiling address of the South Center is: Palm Beach Junior College — South, A.D. 
nderson University School, 500 N.W. 20th Street, Boca Raton, Florida 33432. 
lephone number is 305/395-5100, ext. 2904. West Palm Beach Telephone: 305/439- 
58. 



43 



PBJC District 



Palm Beach Junior College — North 

Palm Beach Junior College North classes are held in a number of locations in the nort 
county area, including, but not limited to, those mentioned below. 

Palm Beach Junior College North: 45th Street Center. Day classes are held 
cooperation with Florida Atlantic University at this center at 2101 45th Street, Wei 
Palm Beach. A full-time teaching staff offers most of the general education classei 
needed for graduation. An office, is open for information, application, counseling an 
registration. Telephone number: 305/842-3500. West Palm Beach Telephone: 439-8156; 

Palm Beach Junior College North: Gardens Center. A college owned mobile offic 
serves as headquarters for evening classes at PBJC-North. Information, applicatioi 
counseling and registration are available at this office. The high school provides use c 
some classrooms in the evening. Address: North Center, Palm Beach Junior College 
Palm Beach Gardens High School, 4245 Holly Drive, Palm Beach Gardens, Florid 
33410. Telephone number: 305/622-3863. West Palm Beach Telephone: 439-8154. 



Other Centers: 

Community Mental Health Center, 1041 45th Street, West Palm Beach. 

Gardens Bowling Lanes, 3169 Northlake Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. 

Gaines Park, 1501 Australian Ave., West Palm Beach 

Howell Watkins Jr. High School, 9480 MacArthur Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens Blvd. 

Jupiter High Community School, 601 W. Toney Penna Dr., Jupiter. 

North Tech Education Center, 7071 Garden Road, Riviera Beach. 

North Palm Beach Country Club, 901 U.S. Hwy. 1, North Palm Beach. 

Young Men's Christian Association - North Branch, 3205 RCA Blvd., Palm Beac 
Gardens. 

Roosevelt Junior High School, 1601 N. Tamarind Ave., West Palm Beach. 

Suncoast High Community School, W. 29th Street, Riviera Beach. 

Students may complete many associate degree programs without attending th 
Central Campus. However, many students may take a mixed schedule of classe 
between PBJC-Central and PBJC-North. 

A master plan for the PBJC-North Campus has been approved for a beautiful 108-acr 
site already purchased by the college. Final plans for Phase I of the PBJC Nort 
campus have been completed, funds have been appropriated, and construction is no\ 
underway. 




44 



Student Affairs and Services 

Student Affairs and Services 

is the desire of Palm Beach Junior College to provide for the in- 
llectual and cultural development of all students. Various 
ovisions sanctioned and supported by our District Board of 
ustees will enable students to plan and achieve acceptable goals. 

ie condition for enrollment at Palm Beach Junior College is that 
udents will abide by all rules and policies of the institution. 

m Beach Junior College officials, and in particular the Vice 
esident of Student Affairs and his staff, have the responsibility for 
terpreting policy. Efforts will be made by all to insure social, moral, 
iltural and intellectual development of students. 



FFICE OF STUDENT AFFAIRS 

le Vice President of Student Affairs and his staff members (ad- 
inistrative, professional and classified) provide the leadership to 
ihance student learning. The services provided specifically include 
it are not necessarily limited to the following: 



1. 


Admissions 


14. 


Insurance 


2. 


Advising 


15. 


Intramurals 


3. 


Assemblies 


16. 


Job Placement 


4. 


Athletics 


17. 


Lost & Found 


5. 


Career Center 


18. 


Orientation 


6. 


Clubs and Organizations 


19. 


Placement Tests 


7. 


Counseling 


20. 


Publications (Student) 


8. 


Financial Aid 


21. 


Recruitment 


9. 


Follow-up Services 


22. 


Registration 




(mini-research) 


23. 


Student Handbook 


10. 


Foreign Students 


24. 


Student Retention & Completion 


11. 


Health Services 


25. 


Testing 


12. 


Housing 


26. 


Veteran Affairs 


13. 


Information 







is, therefore, the concerted effort of the Vice President of Student 
: fairs to see that coordination takes place for the above services at 
campuses and centers for Palm Beach Junior College. It is the 
pressed belief of this office that all students can be helped. 

LADES, NORTH, SOUTH, CAMPUSES (CENTERS) 

udent Affairs at the various campuses including the central one in 
ike Worth are generally available through various personnel. 



45 



Student Affairs and Services 

Admissions 

The detailed discussion of Methods of Admission Procedures is 
the next major section of the Bulletin: "General Regulation." 

Academic Advisement 

Arrangements for academic advising will be made for all enterin 
students by department heads during orientation. At the appointe 
time, advice and information will be given to the student as to whj 
subjects are necessary to accomplish a certain major, as well 
graduation from college. The academic advisor ( will have available fc 
discussion with the student his high school or college transcript! 
high school test record and placement test scores to assist th 
student and the counselor in the choice of an academic progran 
During the school year academic advisors will be available in the 
offices to assist the students in working out the necessary prograr 
for the coming term. Students are encouraged to keep in constar 
touch with academic advisors at all times in order that they may b 
absolutely sure they are taking the right courses needed fc 
graduation in their chosen major. Students bear the major respor 
sibility for course selection. 

Assemblies 

A series of lectures, musical and dramatic productions, and other assembly program 
are provided by the college. 

Athletics 

Palm Beach Junior College has achieved national recognition through inter-collegiat 
athletics. Opportunities for participation are offered for both men and women in -, 
variety of sports that include basketball, baseball, golf, tennis, softball and volleyball 
Membership in the Florida Junior College Conference and the National Junior Colleg 
Athletic Association, largely determines policies and procedures by which tn 
program operates. The Athletics Program provides for the highly-skilled student a 
opportunity for good competition, development of skills, and experiences in sel 
discipline and cooperation. 

Career Information and Study Center 

Located in the north end of the SAC lounge, the Career Information and Study Centej 
is designed to provide assistance with the student's individual career development. II 
addition to guidance and counseling activities, the Center includes a centralize* 
repository of career information of the standard variety — description of career, dutie] 
and responsibilities, salary estimates, job outlook, educational and persona 
qualifications, etc. A collection of up-to-date print and non-print information abou 
careers including films, slides, recording and video cassettes is available. Students art 
encouraged to avail themselves of these materials and services while using the ac 
companying study areas. 



46 



Student Affairs and Services 

Clubs and Organizations 
Student Government 

> management of many student activities is vested in the Executive Department of 
Student Government Association along with the Elected Student Senate under the 
leral direction of the Vice President for Student Affairs and his staff. Some ongoing 
dent activities are managed by the Academic Department to which they are at- 
hed, working cooperatively with students engaged in that activity. 

dents have the right to suggest to their elected representatives in the Student 
»ate and Executive Department any activities that may profit the general welfare of 
students. Students also serve in conjunction with faculty on committees that are 
licated to improvement of the welfare of the student and the college. 

Honorary Organizations 

I THETA KAPPA. Delta Omicron Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa, a national arts and 
ence honor society for junior and community colleges, was instituted in 1943. 
apters were instituted on the other three campuses: Alpha Gamma Sigma in 1977, 
the North Campus, Alpha Delta lota in 1978 on South Campus, and Alpha Delta Nu 
980 on the Glades Campus. The object of the society is to promote scholarship, to 
relop character and to cultivate fellowship among students. Members are selected 
Tt the upper scholastic ten percent of the student body and must be of good moral 
iracter and possess recognized qualities of leadership. Members must maintain at 
st a "B" average. The society offers rich social and cultural experiences. 

I RHO PI. Florida Alpha Chapter of Phi Rho Pi, national honorary forensic society for 
ior colleges, was instituted in April 1953. The purpose of this society is to promote 

interest of debate, oratory, extemporaneous speaking, radio and other speech 
ivities in the junior college. Active membership is conferred only upon regular 
ior college students who are in good standing and who have represented the 
lege in intercollegiate debate, oratory, extemporaneous speaking, dramatic reading 

imilar forensic contests or who have achieved distinction in public speaking. 

I RHO PI ALUMNI CHAPTER. Florida Alpha is the first and only alumni chapter of 
Rho Pi in the United States. The purpose of this society is to encourage the arts of 
jech in the community and to assist the Florida Alpha Chapter of the college in 
rthwhile projects. Any former student of the Florida Alpha Chapter is eligible to join 
rida Alpha Alpha. 

SMA EPSILON MU. This society, institited in 1958, was organized to promote 
lolarship, to develop character, to cultivate fellowship and to provide recognition 
junior college students majoring in the fields of science, engineering and 
tnematics. To be eligible for membership, a regular junior college student must 
n and maintain a 2.5 overall average with a 3.0 average in his major subjects. The 
;iety awards a scholarship cup at graduation to the qualified sophomore with the 
hest point average in these fields. 

SMA PHI ALPHA. Alpha Pi chapter was established in 1968 and is the Dental 
giene Honor Society. Its purpose is to promote, recognize and honor scholarship, 
vice and character among students and graduates of dental/oral hygiene. 



47 



Student Affairs and Services 



Special Interest Groups 



Palm Beach Junior College offers assistance in the formation and official recognit 
of clubs and other organizations of students, faculty and alumni who have interes 
common. There are well-defined procedures for the establishment and chartering . 
special interest group. A list of such groups now chartered is printed below. 
The titles of these groups are generally descriptive of their activity. If additional: 
formation is needed, it may be readily obtained from the Dean of Students Activit 

While formation of special interest groups is encouraged by the college, student 
terest changes from year to year, and the continuance of any activity is obviod 
dependent upon student interest. All the listed groups have been functional inl 
recent past, and will be continued if there is sufficient student interest 



SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS 

Alumni Association 

Amateur Radio Club 

Art Club 

Chess Club 

DECA (Distributive Education Club of America) 

Early Childhood Club 

Foreign Language Club 

Forensics 

Hospitality Unlimited 

Institute of Electrical and Electronic Engineers 

Junior American Dental Hygiene Association 

Black Student Union 

Political Union 

Religious Groups 

Sales and Marketing Club 

Science Club 

Student Education Association 

Students for International 

Understanding 
Student Contractors and 
BuildersAssociation 
Student Nurses Association 
Young Democrats 
Young Republicans 
Veterans Association 



MUSIC ORGANIZATIONS 

Brass Ensemble 
Concert Band 
Concert Choir 
Concert Orchestra 
Guitar Ensemble 
Jazz Ensemble 
Music Theater Guild 
Pacesetters 
Percussion Ensemble 
String Ensemble 
Student Music Educator's 
National Conference 

SERVICE CLUBS 

Circle K 
Civitan 



Counseling (Individual) 

Professional guidance counselors are available to all students for personal voratio J 

^Hpn^f?? 1 C ° Un , Se,ing - NumerouS tests are avai,ab| e in theTst?ng center 1 
studen s to take in order to better understand themselves and their capabilities fheJ 
are a vailable t0 students tnr0(jgh referra| frQm ^ mem bers o^f rom d reclcon til 
with guidance personnel. Students needing to see counselors should Teoort toT 
central receptionist area in the Registrar's office. =>"ouia report tc 



Evening Counseling Service 



Professional guidance counselors will be available in the main office (ReaistraJ 
Office) to provide counseling services for evening students. l«egistra 



48 



Student Affairs and Services 



Financial Aid 



nancial aid, consisting of scholarships, grants, loans and student assistantships is 
ailable to assist deserving and qualified students to attend Palm Beach Junior 
jllege. Nearly all aid is given on the basis of need determined through financial 
lalysis done by ACT, CSS, and BEOG. (Forms for these are available at the Financial 
ds Office.) 

jplication and completed financial analysis must be on file in the Office of Financial 
d. An official award of financial aid cannot be made until an application for ad- 
ission to Palm Beach Junior College has been approved; however, a student should 
)t wait for a notice of admission before submitting an application for financial aid. 
jplication for financial aid should be submitted as soon as possible after January 1. 
iplication will be considered according to the availability of funds and need. A new 
plication for financial assistance for all programs must be submitted each year. 

Standards of Progress for Students 

Receiving BEOG, SEOG, Workstudy, 

Federal Loans 

ie Education Amendments of 1980 established new requirements for student 
gibility for receiving federal student financial aid. 

ie Amendments provide that financial aid payments under the above programs must 
)t be made if a student is not maintaining satisfactory progress in the course of 
udy he&she is pursuing according to the standards and practices of the institution. 

Im Beach Junior College has established the following satisfactory standards of 
;ademic progress. All student recipients of federal student financial aid will be 
aced on academic probation if he&she does not meet the following minimum 
andards; 

Cum. Quality Pt. Avg. of 1.4 for 1 through 14 semester hours attempted 
Cum. Quality Pt. Avg. of 1.6 for 15 through 27 semester hours attempted. 
Cum. Quality Pt. Avg. of 1 .8 for 28 through 45 semester hours attempted. 
Cum. Quality Pt. Avg. of 2.0 for over 45 semester hours attempted 

ie Student shall be notified on the grade report at the end of term if he&she is placed 
i probation. If the appropriate quality point average has not been attained after one 
mester on probation, the student shall be notified on his&her grade report that 
&she is making unsatisfactory progress and that federal student financial aid 
nefits shall be discontinued. 

ie student may reestablish federal student financial aid eligibility by enrolling at 
s&her own expense and subsequently raising his&her cumulative quality point 
terage to meet the above academic standard. 

Scholarships and Grants 

any scholarships and grants are available to needy students for college, state and 
deral funds and through the generosity of local individuals and organizations. While 
ost are awarded on the basis of need, some are granted for special talents and 
cademic achievement. 

tudents seeking athletics grants should contact the Director of Athletics. 

usic grants are awarded on the basis of auditions administered by the Music 
epartment. 



49 



Student Affairs and Services 

PRESIDENT'S SCHOLAR AWARDS. President Scholar Awards are scholarships giveij 
to Palm Beach County High School Graduates in recognition of outstanding pea 
formance as evidenced by their being ranked in the top ten percent and having a 3.fl 
grade point average in their graduating class. The names of high school students whd 
are ranked in the top ten percent and have a 3.0 grade point average are requested frorl 
each high school Principal. (Participating high schools have to meet accreditatioij 
criteria required by PBJC). 

BASIC EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT. A federally sponsored program of aid 
is available for full-time and part-time students (minimum 6 hours enrollment). The 
amount of the award, based on family income is determined by a contractor of thq 
Federal Office of Education. 

SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANTS. A federally sponsored 
program provides a minimum $200 for especially needy students. Amount of the awar<| 
is determined by the college and must be matched usually with College Work Study. 

FLORIDA STUDENT ASSISTANCE GRANT. Awards are made by the State of Floridfl 
for students who are residents of Florida and have demonstrated financial need. 

Law Enforcement Education Program (LEEP) 

Any full-time employee of a publicly funded law enforcement or corrections agenc^ 
may be eligible for a grant covering certain educational expenses. The recipient of a 
grant agrees to remain in the service of some law enforcement agency for two yearg 
following completion of the course for which he receives the grant. 

Failure to complete the required service obligation requires complete repayment o| 
the grant or loan at seven percent simple interest. 

Loans 

While unnecessary borrowing is not encouraged if other forms of aid are available, it 
has become an acceptable means of investing in a person's future. 

COLLEGE LOANS. The college administers several loan funds to be used by graduates] 
going on to upper division. They are granted in varying amounts based on academic 
achievement and need. 

EMERGENCY LOANS. A loan fund has been established to permit a student from $10l 
to $100 on an emergency basis. Loans are made only to students in good standing and 
cannot be used for registration fees. Freshmen must wait until after the first progress] 
reports to be eligible. Loans must be repaid no later than two weeks before final 
examinations in the term in which the loan is made. A 2% service charge is made foq 
these loans. 

FEDERALLY INSURED LOANS. Through Federal assistance, loans covering a 
student's needs are available through banks, savings and loan agencies, credit unions! 
and the state. Applications and financial statements must be submitted to the college] 
for review and then submitted to the lending agency by the student. Nine percent 
simple interest begins after the student leaves college and repayments may be mada 
over a ten year period. 

Student Assistantships 

ASSISTANTSHIPS. A number of campus jobs are available to students who may not] 
qualify under the Federal Work Study Program or have special talents or training. . 1 

COLLEGE WORK STUDY PROGRAM. Through Federal assistance, campus em-i 
ployment is available to students with demonstrated need. Students approved for this] 
program can work no more than 20 hours a week while school is in session. 



50 



Student Affairs and Services 
Graduating Sophomore Scholarships 

tween 26 and 30 scholarships, varying from $100 and $2,000, are available at the end 
the winter term for graduates of Palm Beach Junior College going on to Upper 
ision. While a 3.0 average is required in most cases, need is a primary factor. 

State Vocational Rehabilitation Scholarships 

; Division of Vocational Rehabilitation under the Department of Health and 
labilitative Services provides limited assistance to those persons who are 
rsrcally handicapped. Applicants should contact the Office of Vocational 
labilitation, 271 1 Exchange Court, West Palm Beach. 

International Students 

jcial services are provided for international students by one of the members of the 
jnseling staff. 

Health Services 

; following services are available in the clinic: 

iealth Counseling by appointment 

-irst Aid treatment — limited medication 

Hudent Accident Insurance applications and claim forms 

'hysical Education Medical Waivers 

:ase of serious accident or illness, the family doctor and&or the parents are notified 
mediately by the Student Affairs Office. 

Housing 

ist of available housing, of landlords who will rent to students without regard to 
e, color, creed or national origin, may be obtained from the Student Housing Office, 
ident Affairs Department, AD-O. Students and parents are advised to investigate 
roughly all housing facilities before undertaking any obligations. The college has 
dormitory facilities and has no responsibility for agreements between landlords 
1 students. 

idents without cars, especially international students, should finalize housing 
angements at least one month before date of registering. 

Information 

neral information is coordinated in a special section of the Registrar's Office and in 
Office of the Vice President of Student Affairs, AD-O. 

Insurance 

s suggested that entering students consider applying for accident insurance while 
oiled at PBJC, inasmuch as the college assumes no responsibility should an ac- 
ent occur. Envelopes and information may be obtained in the Health Clinic near the 
ident Affairs Center. Enrollment period limited to 20 days after first day of classes 
:h semester. 

Intramural and Recreational Activities 

ramural and Recreational activities are sponsored by the Department of Physical 
jcation with the assistance of the Student Intramural and Recreational Board, 
jse activities are open to all students. 

3 activities represent a broad selection of sports ranging from highly competitive to 
»se of a recreational nature incfuding individual, dual, and team events. Op- 
'tunities are available for students to participate in all phases of the program, 
ether it be planning and organizing activities, playing, or officiating a particular 
itest. 

3 Intramural and Recreation Board maintains an active membership in the National 
ramural and Recreational Sports Association. 

51 



Student Affairs and Services 

Job Placement 

Placement Services include listing, by Equal Opportunity employers of local part-tii 
full-time, vacation, and summer jobs, regional employment opportunities through 
the U.S. and foreign countries. Recruiters from business, industry, and the Am 
Forces are periodically scheduled for on-campus interviewing. 

Notices of job openings are posted in the Career Information Center, Job Placem 
Office, departmental bulletin boards, and in the Main Office for evening students. 
Placement is also handled in the various departments. 

Lost and Found 

An effort is made to obtain lost and found items. Individual owners are notifiel 
possible. Lost articles may be claimed at the security office. 

Placement Tests 

See Placement Tests under Admission Procedures. 

Publication (Student) 

THE BEACHCOMBER. The Beachcomber, the college newspaper, is published weelf 
Although experience is preferred, a limited number of inexperienced students 
accepted as trainees. Students receive practical, on-the-job training in the fields 
reporting, advertising, editing, photography, and business management. T 
Beachcomber has earned many state and national awards in recent years. 

Orientation 

Days are designated for an Orientation program at the beginning of each term. 

A review of college policies, programs, and activities will be presented to assist t 
student in making the transition to college life. 

Entering students will be given the opportunity to meet with the department cha 
person of the program in which the student plans to study, and arrangements are ma 
at this time for assigning the student an academic advisor. 

Reading Improvement Services 

The Palm Beach Junior College Reading. Center offers credit courses (REA 1105 ar 
REA 1 106) and a free reading improvement program for any currently enrolled studenl 

Recruitment 

The recruitment effort involves a large number of college staff members and student 
and is a continuous process. The college employs a counselor&recruiter who coc 
dinates many of the recruitment activities. 

Registration 

Registration is done by computers prior to each session. Specific information 
provided and coordinated by the Registrar's office. 

Student Handbook 

All regulations and policies pertaining to student conduct are listed in the Studer 
Handbook, which is issued to all students during registration periods throughout eac 
term. Copies are available in the Dean of Student Activities Off ice, AD-0. 



52 



Student Affairs and Services 
Student Retention and Completion 

ormation about student retention and completion in each of the academic programs 
available to students in the Registrar's Office, Student Affairs Office, Career In- 
mation and Study Center, and department chairpersons' office. The availability of 
s information satisfies the federal requirement regarding dissemination of student 
nsumer information as outlined in the Notice of Proposed Rule Making, published in 
Federal Register of April 8, 1977 on page 18749, paragraph 178.5(f), (g), (h). 

Testing 

e Testing Center offers a variety of tests to assist students in selecting a college 
jor or occupation. National tests such as the CLEP, ACT, SAT, DENTAL HYGIENE 
TITUDE TESTS, DENTAL TECHNICIAN TESTS AND COPA TESTS are administered, 
plications for these tests and numerous other tests are available in the Testing 
nter. 

Veterans Affairs 

e college is State approved for veterans training. Veterans and eligible dependents 
o plan to attend under any of the various veteran's training laws should apply to the 
terans Section of the Registrar's office. 

on enrollment, veterans and veteran-dependents are required to pay all regular fees 
d charges, the same as other students, except for disabled veterans attending under 
le 31, who are certified by V.A. prior to enrollment. However, any veteran training 
jer Chapter 31, 32, 34 or 35, Title 38 United States Code may receive a sixty (60) day 
erment to pay his fees by completing the proper forms at the Veterans Section of 
i Registrar's Office and taking these forms to the Cashier's Office. Veterans who 
oose to defer their fees and fail to pay by the end of a 60 day period will be treated as 
ler students who have failed to pay fees. Upon certification by the college and the 
terans Administration, educational allowance is paid monthly to the student for 
ining time computed as follows: 









Quarter Term 


ie 


Regular Term 


Six Week Term 


(South Center) 


1 


12 or more sem. hrs. 


4 sem. hrs. 


8 or more sem. hrs. 


4 


9-11 sem. hrs. 


3 sem. hrs. 


6-7 sem. hrs. 


2 


6-8 sem. hrs. 


2 sem. hrs. 


4-5 sem. hrs. 


3sOnly 


1-5 sem. hrs. 


1 sem. hr. 


4-5 sem. hrs. 



idents claiming benefits and eligible to receive a monthly subsistence check should 
prepared to finance in full his expenses for the first two or three months. When full 
jibility is established, a subsistence check should be expected by the 10th of each 
nth. 

ANDARDS OF PROGRESS — VETERANS 

m Beach Junior College has established the following standards of progress for all 
erans or eligible persons receiving VA benefits to comply with Veterans Ad- 
listration Regulations 14253 and 14277: 

Complete academic records are maintained on each veteran who is certified as 
jible for benefits under the public laws. The records show continuous pursuit and 
rate at which progress is being made. They include final grades in each subject for 
:h term, record of withdrawal from any subject to include the last day of attendance 
a course, and record of enrollment in subjects from which there was a withdrawal. 



53 



Student Affairs and Services 

(2) Complete academic records are maintained of previous college level acaderq 
training and these records clearly indicate the amount of credit accepted whij 
proportionately shortens the training period and the Veterans Administration and fl 
student are so notified. The record is a cumulative record in that it shows the results] 
each term of enrollment, subjects taken and grades earned. 

(3) A veteran or eligible person will be considered to have made unsatisfactc 
progress if he or she is unable to complete his or her graduation requirements witl! 
the approved length of time, as required by the Veterans Administration. The 
requirements are based on a 62 credit hour graduation requirement at Palm Bea] 
Junior College. 

(4) If a veteran or eligible person misses more than 10% of the class meetings foj 
particular course (missing as much as 1&3 of a class counts as an absence, thr 
tardies counts as an absence), and the College does not determine that extenuati] 
circumstances are present (the decision of the instructor shall determine whetheri 
not the student is permitted to make up missed work), the Veterans Administration \a 
be notified of the student's withdrawal from the course. These attendance criteria i 
required of all students, not just veterans. 

(5) Policies relative to standards of conduct and progress required of the student a 
enforced. These include, but are not limited to, placing students on academ 
probation when their quality point average is not: 

1.4 or better for 1 through 14 semester hours attempted 
1.6 or better for 15 through 27 semester hours attempted 
1.8 or better for 28 through 45 semester hours attempted 
2.0 or better for over 45 semester hours attempted 
Quality points are assigned as follows: 

A — 4 quality points per credit hour 
B — 3 quality points per credit hour 
C — 2 quality points per credit hour 
D — 1 quality point per credit hour 
F — quality points per credit hour 
W — withdrew 

WX — dropped for lack of attendance 
*l — Failure until completed 

'Incomplete grades are changed to "F" if not made up within 30 calendar days aft) 
classes begin in the subsequent fall or winter term. 

The scholastic standing of a student is defined as the ratio of the total number] 
quality points to the total number of hours attempted. 

If the appropriate quality point average has not been attained after one semester I 
probation, the Veterans Administration will be notified that the student is makir] 
unsatisfactory progress and that educational benefits should be discontinue( 
Notices of changes of enrollment status are also sent when a student withdravl 
during a term, does not reenroil for a subsequent term, or changes status. 

No student will be considered to have made satisfactory progress when he or she fail 
and&or withdraws from all subjects undertaken when enrolled in 2 or more unit sul 
jects, except when the College determines that there are extenuating circumstances. 
The coordinator of Veterans Affairs is located in the Registrar's office, 439-8108. 



54 









ir'"5 






Genera/ Regulations 



METHODS OF ADMISSION . 
ADMISSION PROCEDURES . 

PBJCFEES 

STUDENT CLASSIFICATION 

ATTENDANCE 

GRADING 

POLICIES 



Methods of Admission 

Methods of Admissions 

CERTIFICATE OF GRADUATION 

The Palm Beach Junior College will accept, certificates from trj 
approved high schools of Florida, from any secondary school 
another state which is accredited by its state university and from an' 
recognized college or university. 

Candidates for admission who have been graduated from an ap 
proved high school will be accepted. Applicants from states othd 
than Florida, who are graduates of out-of-state schools, may not b 
admitted to Palm Beach Junior College if, in the opinion of the Ac 
mission Committee, they will not be able to meet the academj 
standards expected of students at Palm Beach Junior College. 

STATE HIGH SCHOOL EQUIVALENCY DIPLOMA 

Applicants who are at least 16 years of age may qualify for \ht 
diploma upon successful completion of the General Educatioj 
Development Tests. These tests are administered in the Office o 
Adult Education which is an official testing center for the Sta| 
Department of Education. 

Applicants who have a diploma (high school equivalent) obtaine 
through General Educational Department Tests, issued by a Stat] 
Department of Education are eligible for admission in good standing 
The diploma must be in the Registrar's Office before an acceptance 
letter will be granted. 

ADMISSION POLICIES 

Palm Beach Junior College does not discriminate on the basis o 
race, color, ethnic status, national origin, sex, or handicapped statu] 
in admissions, educational programs, or other college programs an^ 
practices. 

In order to maintain the college ideals of scholarship and deporj 
ment, the right is reserved to deny admission to applicants for anj 
reason deemed sufficient. Decision on admission rests with thj 
Registrar. 

One of the conditions for entrance into Palm Beach Junior College ii 
that the student gives his authorization for the college to releasf 
transcripts ^governmental and education institutions. 

In accordance with Florida Statutes, no student will be admitted tj 
Palm Beach Junior College for a period of two years who hal 
previously been expelled from a junior college or university withinj 
two-year period for unlawful possession, sale or use of a narcotij 
drugs, or for campus disruptions. 



56 



Methods of Admission 



Dual Enrollment 



eptionally well qualified Florida high school seniors who have earned a minimum 
10 credits above grade nine with a "C" or better average may, upon written 
>mmendation of their high school principal, enroll at Palm Beach Junior College for 
aximum of seven credit hours per term in the Fall and Winter Terms and four credit 
rs in the Spring Term, prior to their graduation from high school. 

Jents in this program are encouraged to enroll in day classes, but may enroll in 
ing classes. They are responsible for their own transportation. Regular fee 
edules apply. 

Ily enrolled students are considered to remain essentially high school students, 
it is the responsibility of the student and his high school to insure that 
jirements for graduation from high school are met. 

Jents who are dual enrolled will not be permitted to participate in College ac- 
ies. 



Early Admissions 



School seniors meeting all the requirements for dual enrollment, and also 
ring in the 90th percentile of the general tests of the College Boards (SAT) or of the 
srican College Tests (ACT) may, upon written recommendation of their high school 
cipal, enroll full-time at Palm Beach Junior College. In some instances, credits 
led during the early admission period may be used to satisfy graduation 
jirements from high school, with the high school principal determining how these 
Jits are to be utilized. 

Advanced Placement 

the policy of Palm Beach Junior College to grant college credit to a student who 
jents a score of 5, 4 or 3 on one or more of the Advanced Placement Program 
minations of the College Entrance Examination Board. To be eligible for credit, the 
mination must be taken prior to enrollment in college. Credit thus granted by Palm 
ch Junior College is transferable to Florida institutions of higher education par- 
Dating in a statewide agreement. 

College Level Examination Program (CLEP) 

lege credit may be awarded for acceptable scores on the College Level 
mination Program tests developed by the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, 
v Jersey. 

dents presenting official transcripts of acceptable scores will be awarded credit 
l a maximum of 27 semester hours of College Norms. Credits may be earned in the 
awing areas. English, Natural Sciences, Mathematics, Humanities, Social Scien- 
History. 

ne colleges and universities do not allow credit for this program. It is the respon- 
lity of the student to contact the institutions to which he expects to transfer and 
ermine the acceptability of this credit. 

IP credit will allow some students to exempt lower level college courses in General 
ication. Students receiving CLEP credit must register for advanced courses in the 
as exempted to secure additional credit. Entries on official transcripts will be 
jled "CLEP Credit." Entries on transcript in columns of "Hours Attempted" and 
jality Points" will be omitted. 



57 



Methods of Admission 




Departmental and Special Course Examinations 

Students who have been admitted to the College may take, where available, spec 
credit course examinations by paying the current matriculation fee. This fee is 
refundable. Any credit earned will be reported to the student but will not be credit 
until after the student has registered. If the student drops during teh first five days 
the semester the credit will not be granted. 

Military Service Credits 

Palm Beach Junior College grants credit for United States Armed Forces Institi 
(USAFI) College Level Examination Program (CLEP). Credit is not granted for USA 
high school or college level General Education Development Tests. However, studer 
may use the USAFI GED for admission. 

Palm Beach Junior College grants no credit for military service, military schools or 
USAFI courses. 

Project Ahead 

Project Ahead is a cooperative education plan between the U.S. Army and colleges a 
universities throughout the United States. As a participating college, Palm Bea 
Junior College will accept an application from an army enlistee, will provide coi 
seling and advisement, and will act as repository for acceptable college credits earn 
during service years. Since army personnel are frequently transferred, this progrj 
permits the enlistee to organize a continuous education program even though cours 
may be taken at several different institutions. 



58 



Methods of Admission 

Transfer Students 

\ student is classified as a transfer student if he has previously 
egistered at any other college or university regardless of the amount 
f time spent in attendance or credit earned. 

1. Students who enter from other colleges or universities and who ask for 
advanced standing, must furnish a statement of honorable dismissal and 
the official transcript of the work done in the college or university from 
which they transfer, together with a complete statement of the subjects 
offered for entrance at the former school. 

2. The amount of credit allowed for a quarter, semester or term will not exceed 
the amount the student would have been permitted to earn during the same 
period of time at Palm Beach Junior College. 

3. Transfer students enrolling in either the Spring or Summer Term who ex- 
pect to return to the college or university they are currently attending, will 
be admitted by letter of good standing from that college in lieu of tran- 
script. However, if they wish to continue attendance in Palm Beach Junior 
College for an additional term, they MUST file a complete transcript of their 
academic record from the other college(s) in order to meet admission 
requirements for the additional term here. 

4. Students transferring from an institution of higher learning which is not 
accredited by the Association of that area, but has candidacy status, are 
accepted conditionally. When 15 hours of work have been successfully 
completed at Palm Beach Junior College, the student will be given credit 
for acceptable courses which were transferred. 

5. Palm Beach Junior College accepts on transfer only those courses com- 
pleted at other institutions with grades of "D" or higher. All courses on the 
transcript are considered in calculating quality point average for student 
standing and for meeting graduation requirements. 

6. Any student who has been suspended for disciplinary reasons at any 
college or university must be cleared for admission through the Admission 
Committee. 



Transient Students 

tudents currently attending other colleges or universities who plan 
) enroll at Palm Beach Junior College as a visiting student for the 
pring or Summer Term should complete Palm Beach Junior College 
pplication for Admission Forms, or if they have previously been 
tudents at PBJC, reactivate their records. An official college tran- 
cript or a letter of good standing must be mailed directly to the 
egistrar's office. 

ransient students should be advised by their home colleges con- 
erning recommended courses to be completed at Palm Beach 
unior College. 



59 



Methods of Admission 

International Students 

Palm Beach Junior College is authorized under Federal law to enrol 
nonimmigrant alien students. The college welcomes students fron 
other countries who are able to meet certain requirements in additioi 
to following the regular admissions procedures. Additiona 
requirements for international students are: 

1 . Applications must be made at least three months prior to the term in whic 
a student plans to enroll if student wishes an I-20 (student visa) form. 

2. International transcripts must include certified English translations 
Satisfactory academic and conduct records from comparable secondary o 
higher level educational institutions attended must be submitted. Record 
must show the equivalent to U.S. high school graduation. 

3. International applicants must present evidence of proficiency in speakinj 
writing, and understanding the English language by submitting scores 6 
the Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL). This test (TOEFL) i 
administered by ETS, the Educational Testing Service, Princeton, Ne\ 
Jersey 08450, U.S.A. The applicant must assume responsibility for makin 
arrangements directly with ETS to take the examination and must reques 
the results to be sent to the Registrar's Office at PBJC. Successful con 
pletion of level 108 or higher at an American institute of higher learnin 
language center may be accepted in lieu of the Test of English as a Foreig 
Language. 

4. Applicants must present a statement from a local sponsor who will assum 
responsibility for housing accommodations and transportation, 
necessary. Inquiries regarding sponsors should be directed to the Ir 
ternational Student Advisor four to six months prior to the expected date c 
enrollment. 

5. International students must be full-time day students while enrolled s 
Palm Beach Junior College and are expected to complete the two-yea 

. program in two years. 

6. International students planning to attend the South Center (Boca Raton) d 
a student visa must have all required forms in the Registrar's Office tw] 
weeks prior to registration for any term. 

Students on student visas are required by law to have sufficien 
funds to cover all living expenses, tuition, and fees for a minimum d 
one year. Prior to the time the student registers for courses eacl 
term, these funds must be available. No financial aid is available ti 
new international students. Limited funds for emergencies arl 
sometimes made available by local community organization! 
through the International Student Advisor's Office. 

Applicants will be notified by the Registrar of their acceptance ah< 
will be provided with Form I-20A as required by the United State: 
Immigration Office, Department of Justice. 



60 



Admission Procedures 

Admission Procedures 



'rocedures for entering freshman students or undergraduate 
students transferring from another college or university are as 
ollows: 

. ADMISSION FORMS 

vpply to the Office of the Registrar for admission forms. Fill out the application form 
i detail, have the residence affidavit" notarized (page 4 of application form), and for- 
ward completed application to the Registrar's Office. An identification photo is 
equested. 

I TRANSCRIPTS 

ake or mail the transcript form to the high school last attended and ask that it be filled 
tut immediately AFTER your graduation and sent to the Registrar, Palm Beach Junior 
College. If you have attended college elsewhere, you must submit transcripts from all 
olleges attended. Transcripts must be sent directly to the Registrar. 

I STUDENT AFFAIRS HEALTH SERVICES FORM 

v Health Information card must be filled out at registration, and updated at each 
ubsequent registration. 

I PLACEMENT TESTS 

01 first-time-in-college/degree-seeking freshmen are required to take the Palm Beach 
unior College Placement Tests. Results from these tests are used for placement of 
tudents in English, reading and mathematics courses, and are not otherwise used for 
idmissions purposes. Students are to register for appropriate level English, reading 
md mathematics courses as indicated by the Placement Test results. The tests are 
lormally administered on several dates prior to the published registration dates. 
Jotification of specific testing dates and place of administration will be included in 
he acceptance letter. 

ransfer Students from accredited colleges who have completed their English and 
nathematics requirements prior to entering Palm Beach Junior College are not 
equired to complete the Placement Test Battery. 

Jon-Local Students. Those persons applying to PBJC who live out of county or state 
nay make arrangements with their local high school counselor or principal to proctor 
he tests for them. 

I ACCEPTANCE OF STUDENTS 

Jpon completion of all forms, your application will be considered by the Admissions 
Committee and you will be notified of its action. If you are eligible to be admitted, you 
/ill receive an acceptance letter from the Registrar's office, along with dates for 
orientation, registration and final testing. 

my student falsifying application records will be subject to immediate dismissal 
i/ithout refund. 



61 



Admission Procedures 

Specialized Programs 

All students must complete the five steps listed above. Addition* 
requirements for certain specialized programs are listed below 
Requirements must be completed BEFORE admission to college. 

EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY 
TRAINING SELECTION GUIDELINES 

In order to most efficiently and effectively provide the citizens o 
Palm Beach County with professionally trained and qualifie< 
Paramedics, Palm Beach Junior College, in concert with rt 
Emergency Medical Advisory Council, has set the following prioritie 
for enrollment into EMT 2208 Emergency Medical Technology 
Paramedic 1. 

1. Currently employed fire-rescue, public safety, and/or police personnel. 

2. Currently employed and/or reliable volunteers with ambulance or other life 
saving agencies. 

3. Basic EMT personnel with State Certification and a minimum of one (1) yea 
experience who do not qualify under #1 and #2 above. 

4. Persons who have previously enrolled but did not successfully complete EM 
2208. 

5. All other personnel not covered by the above. 

6. Personnel who have previously taken EMT 2208 (8 credit hours) will not b 
eligible to enroll in EMT 2208 or EMT 2209.* 

Course Enrollment Requirements 

Personnel who wish to enroll in the EMT class must: 

1. Be a State Certified EMT I. Persons with 1 year or more experience will receiv 
preference. If the certificate is older than 3 years, satisfactory refresher course 
or their equivalent must be taken. 

2. Be a resident of the state of Florida. 

3. Be free of habituating agents. 

4. Be able to lift 100 pounds. 

5. Furnish medical evidence prior to final class selection that their physical con 
dition allows them to satisfactorily perform paramedica competencies.** 

6. Furnish liability and accident insurance. 

7. Have use of a stethoscope and B.P. cuff. 

At present, because of equipment, clinical and staffing restrictions, all Paramedi 
classes shall be conducted on the Central Campus. 

'College policy does not allow a student to receive credit for subject content mon 
than once. 

** Persons employed in agencies requiring a physical exam may use their employmen 
physical. Persons without an employment physical must have a licensed physiciat 
complete the College's Medical Examination form. 



62 



Admission Procedures 

PALM BEACH JUNIOR COLLEGE NURSING 
ADMISSION POLICIES 

Dplicants wishing to be considered for acceptance into the 
ssociate of Science Degree Nursing Program must file the 
lowing documents with the Admissions Office of the Registrar by 
arch 17th. 

(1) A completed application form for the Palm Beach Junior College Nursing 
Program. 

(2) Transcripts: 

(a) Request your high school to mail your transcript to the Registrar's 
Office. If you are not graduating until June, request that a partial 
transcript including one complete semester of your senior year and 
rank in class be sent in February. 

(b) College students must also request ALL colleges attended to send an 
official transcript of credits to the Registrar's Office. 

(c) A transcript documenting that you are taking or have taken a high 
school chemistry course or PBJC's CHM 1015 or its equivalent within 
the past five years with an earned grade of "C" or better. 

(3) A completed medical examination form within one year of March 17. THE 
FORM MUST INDICATE IMMUNIZATION DATES WITHIN THE LAST TEN 
YEARS. 

(4) The Twelfth Grade Placement Test or ACT Test if no college degree is held. 
If the Twelfth Grade Placement Test does not demonstrate a score of at 
least 200 or the ACT a National Percentile score of at least 39, then a 
transcript with at least 24 semester hours of college credit must be sub- 
mitted. 

•PLICANTS FOR THE NURSING PROGRAM MUST COMPLETE ALL OF THE ABOVE 
iQUIREMENTS BEFORE THEIR APPLICATION WILL BE CONSIDERED. 

udents whose Twelfth Grade Placement Test scores or ACT Test scores place them 
remedial math and/or English as well as students who score less than 200 on the 
relfth Grade Placement Test or below a National Percentile score of 39 on the ACT 
st will be required to complete a minimum of 24 college semester hours which will 
:lude at least 6 hours of Natural Science with grades of "C" or better. All students 
ist have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of 2.0 in all college work attempted 
the end of the past term. 

ur selection will be based on the following criteria: 

(1) Chemistry grade 

(2) Florida Twelfth Grade or ACT Test 

(3) Grade Point Average. College GPA will be used if twelve or more hours. 

Students may challenge the Nursing courses if previous experience and 
academic preparations warrant. Challenge examinations must be arranged 
through the Department Chairperson. Examinations for fall courses must 
be completed before June 1 and courses for the winter must be challenged 
before November 1. 

Both men and women are eligible to apply, regardless of marital status or 
age. Florida residents will have priority. However, graduates must have 
attained the age of nineteen to write the licensing examination in Florida. 



63 



Admission Procedures 



Applicants whose files are not complete by March 17 may be considen 
only if vacancies are available prior to the beginning of the Fall Term. Ea< 
applicant not accepted by the Fall Term must reapply between January 
and March 15 if they wish to be considered for the next class. 

If a student wishes to be readmitted to the Nursing Program, he or she mu 
make reapplication by March 17th. 

A student will be asked to withdraw from the Nursing Program if he or sf 
receives more than one academic failure in a nursing course or courses. 

A student, upon admission to the Nursing Program must have a high scho 
diploma from an accredited institution or a State high school equivaleni 
diploma. 

LPN TORN PROGRAM 

Minimum Requirements to Apply for Admission: 

1 . Be a Licensed Practical Nurse. 

2. Have at least a 2.0 average on all college work. 

3. Have at least a "C" in Anatomy and Physiology, Microbiology ar 
Chemistry. 

4. Have passed the challenge examinations in (a) Nursing Fundamentals; | 
Obstetrics; and (c) Pediatrics. 

5. Have completed the following courses: 
APB1190 Anatomy and Physiology I 
APB 1 190L Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 
APB 1 1.91 Anatomy and Physiology II 
APB 1 191 L Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 

CHM 1015 Chemistry (will accept if has been within 

5 years in high school) 
ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 

MCB 1000 Microbiology 

MCB 1000L Microbiology Lab 

Phys. Ed.(2) (if under 35 years of age) 

PSY2012 General Psychology 

SOC 1200 Introduction to Social Sciences 

POS1001 Introduction to Political Science (or AMH 2010; U. 

History to 1865; or POS 2041 American National Goveri 

ment) 

6. Math equivalency exam. 

7. Completed physical exam. 

8. Students will need to have accident insurance of some type. 

9. Have passed prerequisite skills in nursing lab. 
Credit as listed above will be given when the applicant has passed each of th 
challenge exams with at least a "C" grade: 

Fundamentals of Nursing 6 credits 

Obstetrics 2 credits 

Pediatrics 2 credits 

10 credits 
10. Have had a minimum of six (6) months full-time work experience in an acut 

care setting within the last five (5) years. 
The fee for challenge exams is the current matriculation fee. 



64 



Admission Procedures 



ENTAL HEALTH SERVICES 

• the purposes of sanitation, safety and to develop professional pride in appearance, 
re are specific requirements in laboratory and clinic dress for all Dental Health 
vices students. 

ENTAL HYGIENE 

alicants must: (1) be a resident of Florida for 12 months prior to registration date; (2) 
;ure a special application packet for Dental Hygiene from the admissions section of 
Registrar's Office; (3) take the American Dental Hygiene Aptitude Test; (4) submit 
ults of the Florida Twelfth Grade Placement Test or the ACT (American College 
.ting Program) given in October, November or February; (5) have medical and dental 
imination results recorded on the forms furnished by the College; (6) complete all 
>lication procedures by March 15, (high school seniors should submit partial 
iscripts covering all but final semester's work — complete transcripts are required 
3r graduation.) (7) A transcript documenting that a student is taking or has taken a 
h school chemistry course, or PBJC's CHM 1015 or its equivalent within the past 
s years with an earned grade of "C" or better. 

ENTAL ASSISTING 

jlicants must (1) have a medical and dental examination, results of which are 
orded on a form furnished by the College; (2) have a personal interview with a staff 
mber of the Dental Assisting Program. 

ENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 

jlicants must (1) take the aptitude test as scheduled by the PBJC Dental Health 
iter; (2) have a personal- interview with a staff member of the Dental Laboratory 
:hnology Program. 

EADMISSION PROCEDURES TO DENTAL 
EALTH PROGRAMS 

)uld a Dental Hygiene or Assisting student voluntarily withdraw before completion, 
ail to meet course requirements and decide to return, it will be necessary to: 

1 . Reapply as a new student. 

2. All student application records must be updated to be considered for the 
new class. 

SCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT 

)licants must be (1) a high school graduate; (2) if the applicant has college work, 
n he&she must have a "C" average on all work attempted. 

INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION 

ACCEPTANCE GUIDELINES FOR 

LIMITED ACCESS PROGRAMS 

i policy for the consideration of admission of international students into the limited 
ess programs is as follows. The student will have: 

1. at least a 500 on the TOEFEL or at least a 69 on the Michigan English 
Language Proficiency Exam; 

2. the equivalent to a high school diploma; 

3. successfully completed with a "C" or better all of the course prerequisites 
for selection prior to entry into the major field of itnerest; 



65 



Admission Procedures 

4. completed all of the diagnostic entrance exams required or 24 colle 
semester hours with at least a 2.0 CGPA. These hours will include at le 
two natural sciences with grades of "C" or better; 

5. submitted their applications directly to the Registrar's Office; and, 

6. completed all of the application materials prior to the deadline date as i 
forth by the Registrar's Office. 

Reactivated Students 

A student who wishes to return to Palm Beach Junior College for day classes after 
absence of one or more terms should: 

(1) Write Registrar's Office by deadline date in current calendar request 
that his records be made active. 

(2) File for additional forms or transcripts necessary to update admiss 
records. 

Acceptance letter will be issued upon completion of items (1) and (2). 

Dual College Enrollment 

A currently enrolled student at Palm Beach Junior College may not attend anotl 
institution, except with permission from the Registrar's Office of Palm Beach Jun 
College. 

Credit will not be granted at Palm Beach Junior College if a student is enrolled 
another college without permission during the same session. The Palm Beach Jun 
College registration will be cancelled and there will be no refund of fees. 

Florida Atlantic University and Palm Beach Atlantic College students must have 
proval of the Dean of his or her college to attend PBJC. Forms may be obtained in t 
Registrar's Office, Florida Atlantic University or Palm Beach Atlantic College. 



Handicapped Students 



Palm Beach Junior College is making efforts to comply with all laws and regulatio 
applicable to qualified handicapped individuals as required in Section 504 of t 
Rehabilitation Act of 1973. 

College personnel are aware of the kinds of problems handicapped students face a 
are anxious to help solve them. 

A common effort has been undertaken to make College facilities and services availat 
and useful to students with physical and other types of disabilities. 

Information about the accessibility and facilities of campus buildings, classroc 
assistance, parking, and schedule accommodations is available. 

It is helpful to identify needs before registration. Please inquire of the Director 
Health Services. 

Senior Citizens 

Senior citizens are a welcome part of the student body at Palm Beach Junior Collej 
in both day and evening classes. A board policy designed to encourage even fuller u 
of the college by senior citizens is given in detail in the "PBJC FEES" section. 



66 



PBJC Fees 



PBJC Fees 



I fees are due at the time of registration. No registration will be 
mpseted until all matriculation fees, tuition fees, and 
iscellaneous fees have been paid in full. A student may not attend 
isses until this has been completed. Personal checks may be 
cepted for the amount of fees due. It is suggested that each 
jdent bring two checks to registration; one for registration and one 
lich may be used to purchase books and supplies. All fees subject 
change by action of the Board of Trustees. 

BASIC FEE SCHEDULE 
jdent fees at Palm Beach Junior College have been established by 
) Board of Trustees effective with the Fall Term as follows: 

State Students (Florida Residents) 
Matriculation Fee, $16.00 per semester hour-all terms 

it-of-State Students (non-Florida Residents) 

Matriculation and Tuition Fee, $32.00 per semester hour-all 
rms 



b fees have been established for all courses which require ex- 
ndable materials in addition to above fees. Additional lab fees may 
assessed as required. 




67 



PBJC Fees 

Special Fees* 

MISCELLANEOUS FEES 

Fees for Parking: 

All licensed vehicles, other than visitors, will be required to ha\ 
a parking decal. Employees (full-and part-time) will not 
charged for decals. Deeals will expire August 1 of each year. 
Decals will be sold in the College Bookstore as follows: 

Fall and&or Winter Term $5.( 

Spring or Summer Term $2.( 

Replacement and for temporary use of 

another vehicle $1 .( 

Decals will be required for workshops as follows: 

(a) to 7 weeks temporary guest decals will be issue 
free. 

(b) 7 weeks or more a decal must be purchased, priced i 
above. 

Fraudulent use of a parking decal can result in a fine equal to tr 
appropriate fee. 

An area south of Eissey Street will be designated as decal-fre 
parking after 4:30 p.m. 

Parking and Traffic Fines 

Failure to register a vehicle $2.C 

Parking and Miscellaneous Violations $2.G 

Moving Violations 

1st Offense $2.C 

2nd Offense $4.0 

3rd Offense $6.0 

4th Offense Automatic suspension of campi 

driving privilege; 

Transcript Fee $2.0 

Two transcripts, whether partial or final, are furnished free of charge 
Additional transcripts will not be issued until this fee is paid. 

Special Term Examination Fees $3.C 

Fee for Department and Special Course 

Examinations Current Matriculation Fe 

Special Announced Test Fee $2.0 

Graduation Fee $11.0 

Late Registration Fee (5.00 per cours< 

Returned Check Fee $10.00 or 5% of check, whichever is greatc 

Student Liability Insurance Fee . . . ; $8.5 

Required in certain courses where the student is providing a servjc 
to the public. Payable once per calendar year. 

*Special fees are assessed in addition to the Basic Fee schedule. Special fees rru 
vary from Center to Center. 



68 



PBJC Fees 

ENTAL FEES 

Cleaning &X-Rays 

Employees and Students, $1.00 

Anyone Off Campus Over 18 years of age $4.00 

Anyone Off Campus Under 18 years of age $2.00 

BRARY FEES 

a book is lost, you pay the acquisition price of that book. For an overdue book the 
arge is 50 a day per school day, excluding weekends. You will only be charged up to 
3 acquisition price of the book. 

IPLIED MUSIC FEES 

All Applied Music courses require special fees. 

Applied Music courses are numbered MV, and may be MVB (Brass), MVK 
(Keyboard), MVP (Percussion), MVS (Strings), MVV (Voice), or MVW (Wood- 
winds). 
Applied Music — Class Instruction 

(2 class hours weekly) $20.00 

Applied Music — Private Instruction 

One half-hour lesson weekly $30.00 

(Preparatory — Freshman Level, Secondary 

Instrument — Freshman and Sophomore Level) 
Two one-half hour lessons weekly $60.00 

(Principal Instrument — Freshman and Sophomore Level) 

HYSICAL EDUCATION FEES* 

Aquatics (Fundamentals of), PBJC Central $17.00 

Aquatics (Fundamentals of), PBJC North 5.00 

Bowling 35.00 

Life Saving & Water Safety, Swimming 17.00 

'Fees estimated and are subject to change 

kB FEES 

B 1190L Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory 10.00 

B 1 191 L Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory 10.00 

B 2303 Medical Laboratory Procedures I 6.00 

B 231 1 Medical Laboratory Procedures II 6.00 

IT 1100 Art and Crafts I 10.00 

IT 1 101 Art and Crafts II 10.00 

IT 1110 Ceramics 1 10.00 

IT 1111 Ceramics II 10.00 

IT 1155 Enameling and Jewelry 10.00 

IT 1203 Three Dimensional Design 10.00 

IT 1230 Advertising Design I 10.00 

IT 1300 Drawing I 10.00 

IT 1301 Drawing II 10.00 

IT 2302 Drawing III 10.00 

IT 1600 Introduction to Photography 10.00 

IT 2601 Photography 1 10.00 

IT 2604 Photography II 10.00 

IT 2130 Fabric Design and Weaving 10.00 

IV 2105 Dye Transfer Photography 10.00 

IV 2214 Screen Printing 10.00 

IT 2400 Introduction to Printmaking 10.00 

IT 2401 Printmaking 10.00 

IT 2701 Sculpture 10.00 

1600 Basic Flight Simulator Lab 75.00 

2605 Basic Flight Advanced Lab 75.00 

2610 Advanced Instrument Flight Lab 100.00 

69 



PBJC Fees 

ATT 2691 Instrument Refresher Sim. Lab 15.1 

BCN 2253C Architectural Drafting 2.1 

BOT 1010L General Botany Laboratory 10.( 

BOT 1153L Botany II Laboratory 6.C 

CHM1015L Laboratory f or CHM 1015 10.1 

CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 10.1 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 10.1 

CHM 2200C Principles of Organic Chemistry 10J 

CHM2210L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1QJ 

CHM 221 1L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 10.1 

CHM 2120C Quantitative Analysis 10.C 

CJT 2100 Criminal Investigation 2.I 

CJT 2140 Introduction to Criminalistics 2.I 

COC1110 Introduction to Computers 51 

COP 1160 Programming RPG II m 

COP 1400 Basic Assembly Language 51 

COP 21 10 Mathematical Programming 5.C 

COP 2120 Programming COBOL 5.C 

COP 2121 COBOL Applications 5.C 

COP 2461 RPG II Applications 6.1 

DEA 1020C Preclinical Orientation 10.C 

DEA 1800C Clinical Practice 1 10.C 

DEA 1801C Clinical Practice II 10.0 

DEA 1802C Clinical Practice III 10.C 

DEA 1820C Intraoral Auxiliary Procedures I 10.0 

DEA 1821C Intraoral Auxiliary Procedures II 10.0 

DEH 1800L Clinical Dental Hygiene 1 20.C 

DEH 1802L Clinical Dental Hygiene II 2O.0 

DEH 2806L Clinical Dental Hygiene III 20.C 

DEH 2808L Clinical Dental Hygiene IV 20.C 

DES 1000L Dental Anatomy 15.0 

DES 1 100L Elements of Dental Materials Laboratory 10.0 

DES 1200L Dental Radiology 10.0 

DTE 1100L Complete Denture Techniques 1 20.0 

DTE 1 101 L Complete Denture Techniques II 20.Q 

DTE 1 1 10L Cast Inlay and Crown Techniques 2O.0 

DTE1120L Partial Denture Techniques I 20.0 

DTE1140L Ceramics I 20.Q 

DTE 1 150L Crown and Bridge Technique I 20.0 

DTE 2121 L Partial Denture Techniques II 20.0 

*DTE2130L Special Prosthesis 20.0 

DTE 2131 L Ortho & Pedo Rem. App 20.0 

DTE 2151 L Crown and Bridge Technique II 20.0 

EEC 2531 Early Childhood Directed Observation & Participation I 

Laboratory 5.0 

EEC 2533 Early Childhood Directed Observation & Participation II 

Laboratory 5.0 

EEC 2940L Montessori Practicum 1 5.0 

EEC 2941 • • 20.0 

EMT 2209 Emergency Medical Tech-Paramedic II 20.0 

SUR 2100C Surveying I 3.0 

SUR 2610C Surveying II 3.0 

ETD2711C Machine Drafting I 2.0 

ETD 2450C Advanced Engineering Design 2.0 

ETD 2801C Technical Illustration 2.0 

ETE1001 Essentials of Electricity 3.0 

ETE 1010L DC Circuit Analysis Laboratory 3.0 

ETE 1020L AC Circuit Analysis Laboratory 3.0 



70 



PBJC Fees 

Electronics I 3.00 

Electronics II 3.00 

Advanced Electricity 3.00 

Properties and Test, of Materials 3.00 

Manufacturing Processes 3.00 

Refrigeration Cycles and Equipment 3.00 

Microbiology for Wastewater Tech. Laboratory 6.00 

Food for the Family 6.00 

Quantity Food Comp. and Prep 15.00 

Co-op Hospitality Management I 15.00 

Co-op Hospitality Management II 15.00 

Microbiology Laboratory 15.00 

Medical and Surgical Nursing 1 5.00 

Medical and Surgical Nursing II 5.00 

Fundamentals of Nursing 5.00 

Introduction to Marine Science Laboratory 6.00 

Therapeutic Media 10.00 

Occupational Therapy Practicum 2.00 

Occupational Therapy Act. Laboratory 10.00 

Experiments in Genetics. 6.00 

Badminton 3.00 

Racquet Ball&Paddle Ball 3.00 

Golf 3.00 

Archery 3.00 

Beginning Tennis 3.00 

Intermediate Tennis 3.00 

Basic Sailing 3.00 

Intermediate Swimming and Diving 5.00 

Laboratory for PHY 2023 and PHY 2048 5.00 

Laboratory for PHY 2024 and PHY 2049 5.00 

Physical Science Laboratory 5.00 

Beginning Typewriting 5.00 

Typewriting. 5.00 

Intermediate Typewriting 5.00 

Shorthand '. 5.00 

Dictation and Transcription 5.00 

Machine Transcription 5.00 

Office Practice 5.00 

Advanced Typewriting 5.00 

Advanced Shorthand Diet. & Transcr 5.00 

Machine Shorthand ' 5.00 

Machine Shorthand I 5.00 

Machine Shorthand II 5.00 

Machine Shorthand III 5.00 

Special Appl. of Diet. & Transcr 5.00 

General Zoology Laboratory 7.50 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Lab 10.00 

FOR EARLY LEARNING AND EARLY CHILDHOOD 
OGRAMS: 

1. Overall non-refundable materials fee of $10.00 to be paid by student-parents 
prior to enrollment each term. If a child is enrolled after beginning of term, 
materials fee will be graduated on a monthly basis. 

2. Enrollment fees are charged on a sliding scale according to ability to pay, 
as follows: 

a. $15.00 per week 

b. $20.00 per week 

c. $25.00 per week 

3. A fee in the amount of $2.00 per week for each child for snacks will be 
assessed. 

71 



PBJC Fees 

FEES FOR SENIOR CITIZENS IN CREDIT CLASSES 

Senior Citizens who are residents of Florida and 60 years of age or older may regis! 
at the beginning of each term for a maximum of two classes on the final day of 
regularly scheduled drop&add period providing a vacancy exists in a section of a crec 
class and the fee will be waived. The exception will be enrollment in prograri 
requiring selective admissions criteria. 

Senior citizens will- be expected to pay all regularly assessed special fees for ar 
classes in which they enroll. 

Senior citizens, for the purpose of this policy, shall be those individuals who hai 
reached the age of 60 by the day of registration. 

SHORT COURSE, NON-CREDIT FEES 

Fees to cover the cost of instruction and materials for short courses, non-crefl 
courses and workshops will be announced for each course offering. 

OTHER INDIVIDUAL PROGRAM COSTS 

Students enrolled in Dental Assisting, Dental Hygiene, Nursing, Paramedic, Ment 
Health Technology, and Occupational Therapy Assisting must purchase approve 
insurance and provide for transportation to the agencies for clinical experienc 
Nursing, Dental Hygiene, Dental. Assisting, Dental Laboratory Technology, Paramedi 
and Occupational Therapy Assistant students must also purchase approved unifornj 
and&or special kits as required. 

Art, Engineering, Drawing and Drafting students will also have special equipment ad 
supplies which they must purchase in addition to the normal cost of textbooks. 

REFUNDS 

Students who withdraw from college within the first five class days of any term, (d 
cept Spring Term — first three days) not including days set aside solely fc 
registration, will be reimbursed eighty percent of the tuition and fees. The studer 
withdrawing must notify Registrar. 

Pre-scheduled students who have prepaid fees will be reimbursed one hundred pe 
cent of fees paid, if they notify the Registrar's Office in person before officii 
registration begins as published in current catalog for any term. After officq 
registration begins, only eighty percent will be reimbursed. 

Students must present completed documentation for change from out-of-state toll 
state classification to the Registrar before the first day of classes to be eligible for] 
refund of the out-of-state portion of their fees. , 

GRADUATION FEE 

100% Refund: Students who fail to meet graduation requirements due to College erroj 
including advising errors. 

No Refund: Students who withdraw or who fail to meet graduation requirements due tj 
the student's lack of performance, or when official permission has been given t 
graduate in absentia. 

Time Limitation: The graduation fee has a one-year limitation. If graduation does n<3 
occur within one year of the end of the term in which it is paid, the student would agaiSj 
be assessed the fee, if he plans to graduate. 

SPECIAL FEES FOR MUSIC 

No refund is allowed unless the student is subsequently found to be ineligible by trj 
College for the class. 



72 



PBJC Fees 

SPECIAL FEES FOR PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Some of these fees are held in trust for the vendor, and a 100% refund for withdrawal 
rom these courses can be made, based upon the same criteria as the refund of regular 
uition fees for the class. 

DELINQUENT ACCOUNTS (INCLUDING RETURNED CHECKS) 

ny student who has a delinquent account shall be notified. If the delinquency is not 
beared within the time period specified, the Dean of Student Activities will inform the 
student that he has been placed on disciplinary probation, suspended from class 
ittendance, subject to immediate suspension from College, and have all academic 
ecords frozen until the account is cleared. 

STUDENT FEE AUDIT 

\n audit of all fees collected will be conducted by the College staff at the close of each 
egistration. 

n accordance with College policy, all students owing additional fees as a result of this 
ludit will be required to pay them. Overcollection of fees will be refunded. 

SOCIAL SECURITY 

The social security law provides benefits up to age 22 to children whose parent on 
whom they were dependent dies or starts receiving social security retirement or 
Usability benefits. The student must be in full-time attendance in an educational in- 
stitution. Full time at PBJC is 12 credit hours. 

Student Residence Classification 

A student's residence classification is determined at the time of his 
first registration at Palm Beach Junior College. Students may change 
to Resident Student at the change of term after having their legal 
domicile in the State of Florida for 12 months. To change to Resident 
Student, a Declaration of Domicile must be on file in the Registrar's 
Office prior to the first class meeting. 

RESIDENT STUDENT 

A student is considered a Resident Student when he (or, if a minor, 
his parents, parent or legal guardian) has had his place of bona fide 
permanent resident in the State of Florida for at least 12 months 
immediately preceding his registration at Palm Beach Junior 
College. Legal papers proving his guardianship must accompany the 
application of students claiming Resident Student classification 
through a legal guardian. 

OUT-OF-STATE STUDENT 

Unless a student (or, if a minor, his parents, parent or legal guardian) 
has had his place of bona fide permanent residence in the State of 
Florida for at least 12 months immediately preceding his registration, 
he will be classed as an Out-of-State Student and be subject to the 
Out-of-State tuition fee. (Proof of guardianship required.) Employees 
of the School Board of Palm Beach County or of Palm Beach Junior 
College who are themselves students at PBJC and who wish to 
request a waiver of Out-of-State tuition fees may obtain the proper 
form from the county superintendent's office or from the College. 

73 



Student Residence Classification 

SOPHOMORE AND FRESHMAN 

A student is considered a sophomore when he has completed 
twenty-four semester hours of credit, regardless of the number of 
terms he has been in attendance. When he has completed less than 
twenty-four hours of credit, he is a freshman. 

FULL-TIME STUDENT 

A student is considered a full-time student when he is carrying 
twelve or more semester hours of credit. A Spring or Summer Term 
student must carry 4 semester hours in each six-week Term to be 
considered full-time during that Term. Although audit courses carry 
no credit, they are counted as part of the student's load. However, 
when figuring credit load for Selective Service deferment, Social 
Security benefits or Veterans Administration benefits, non-credit 
subjects cannot be counted but must be taken in addition to the 
required number of credit hours. 
AUDITORS 

A student may be admitted to any course as an auditor with the 
consent of the Registrar. Students auditing a course must be regular 
in attendance, but not required to take tests and examinations. No 
audit student may change his registration to seek credit in any 
course in which he is enrolled as an auditor. 

ATTENDANCE, WITHDRAWAL, AND CHANGE-OFGRADE 
PROCEDURES 

Punctual and regular attendance is expected of students in all courses and course 

activities for which they are registered. Any class session missed, regardless of cause, 

reduces the opportunity of learning and frequently affects adversely the grade the 

student achieves in a course. A student is required to attend at least 90% of the class 

meetings in order to receive credit for the course. An accurate record of attendance 

and tardies will be kept for each class. If a student misses as much as one-third of a 

class, he will be counted absent. Three tardies will be counted as one absence. 

If, for some unavoidable reason, a student should have to miss a class session, it is the 

student's responsibility to contact the teacher immediately to determine what 

measures can be taken to maintain the continuity of the course. It shall be the decision 

of the teacher as to whether or not the student shall be permitted to make up the work 

missed. 

Any student who misses more than 10% of the class meetings after last day of drop 

and add for a particular course will receive a grade of "WX" or "F", unless the teacher, 

because of extreme extenuating circumstances, permits the student to remain in the 

course; or, unless the student completes an official withdrawal form. An official 

withdrawal would entitle the student to a grade of "W." 

A student when officially representing the College, such as on a field trip, shall not be 

counted absent, provided prior notice is given the teacher and the work is made up. 



74 



Attendance 

In order to withdraw from a course, a student must properly complete class withdrawal 
before the end of the 10th week of the Fall or Winter Term, or before the end of the 4th 
week of the Spring or Summer Term. (The dates for the quarter system classes are 
prior to the end of the 7th week of any quarter.) 

The dates for withdrawal from a class apply to a change from credit to audit. 

Incomplete grades must be removed within 30 calendar days after the first scheduled 
day of classes in the subsequent Fall or Winter Term. 

A teacher's change of grade for a course taught in the Fall Term must be completed 
before the end of the following Winter Term. Any grade changes for classes taught in 
the Winter Term, Spring Term, or Summer Term must be completed before the end of 
the following Fall Term. For changes of grades for classes taught on the quarter 
system, the change must be completed prior to the end of the subsequent quarter. 

ABSENCE FROM EXAMINATIONS 

Absence from an examination will count as failure unless it is for extreme necessity 
and a special examination is taken later. A fee of $3.00 will be charged for a special 
term examination and a fee of $2.00 for a special announced test given during the term. 

Grading 

GRADING SYSTEM 

The following grading system is used in Palm Beach Junior College: 
A — Excellent I — Incomplete 

B — Good W — Withdrew 

C — Fair AU — Audit 

D — Poor but Passing NC — Non-credit Course 
F — Failure WX — Withdrawn for Excessive 

Absences 

GRADE POINT AVERAGE 

The grade point average is determined by dividing the total quality 
points earned by the total semester hours attempted. Quality points 
are assigned as follows: A, 4 quality points per credit hour; B, 3 
quality points per credit hour; C, 2 quality points per credit hour; D, 1 
quality point per credit hour. Only the last attempt of a repeated 
course will be used in computing the grade point average. 

GRADE REPORTS 

Grade reports are sent to students at the end of the term; a progress 
report is given the student at midterm. The only grades officially 
recorded are those issued at the end of a term. 

ACADEMIC HONORS LIST 

The Academic Honors List shall be published for all campuses at the 
end of each major term. All students who have made an average of 
3.0 or more (B or above) while carrying a full academic load within a 
term shall have their names placed on the Academic Honors List. 



75 



Grading 




STUDENT LOAD 

Most students are not permitted to carry more than 18 semester hours. However, a 
student whose name appears on the Academic Honors List for the previous term and 
who has at least a 3.0 cumulative average, may enroll in a maximum of 21 semester 
hours during the Fall or Winter Term and 9 semester hours during the Spring or 
Summer Term. 

INCOMPLETE WORK 

Incomplete grades are changed to "F" automatically if not made up within 30 calendar 
days after classes begin in the subsequent fall or winter term. 

ACADEMIC PROBATION 

Palm Beach Junior College is responsible for providing a student with the best 
possible education in both an economical and efficient manner. In order to achieve 
this, the College requires each student to maintain reasonable academic progress. 

Any student not maintaining the following standards of progress will be placed on 
academic probation. Probation will be continued as long as he or she fails to achieve 
the standard set for the number of hours attempted. 

Any student on academic probation will be limited in his course load to a maximum of 
t2 semester hours during the Fall and Winter Terms and 4 semester hours during the 
Spring or Summer Term. 

Standards of Progress 

Cumulative Quality Point Average of: 

1 .4 or better for 1-14 semester hours attempted 
1 .6 or better for 15-27 semester hours attempted 
1 .8 or better for 28-45 semester hours attempted 
2.0 or better for over 45 semester hours attempted 

Probation will be figured at the end of each school term (Spring and 
Summer Terms will be considered as one term for semester system). 

A committee on probation will be appointed by the College President 
to pass on any appeal cases. 



76 



Policies 

Policies 

STUDENT CONDUCT 

College students are considered to have reached the age of 
responsibility and discretion. Their conduct, both in and out of 
college, is expected to be dignified and honorable. Students must 
realize from the first that the responsibility for their success in 
college work rests largely upon themselves. Policies and regulations 
of the college are formulated by the District Board of Trustees, the 
Faculty of the college, the Student Government, and the Inter-Social 
Club Council. Each student, by the act of registering, obligates 
himself to obey all rules and regulations formulated by the college. 

SECURITY OF STUDENT RECORDS 

1. INSPECTION OF RECORDS 

A. Eligible Persons 

In compliance with the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (The 
Buckley Amendment) the student records at PBJC (located in the 
Office of the Registrar) are open for inspection only by the student or 
parents of dependent students (as defined by Section 152 of the In- 
ternal Revenue Code) and as per Paragraph #99.31 of the Buckley 
Amendment. 

1. School officials who have legitimate educational interests. 

2. State educational authorities. 

3. Federal and State officials representing state or federal programs. 

4. Persons having written authorization for release. 

5. Officials in compliance with Judicial orders. 

B. Viewing the Record 

1. Permanent records are never permitted out of the Office of the 
Registrar. 

2. Students may view their records at the counter in the presence of 
office personnel. 

2. PRIOR CONSENT FOR DISCLOSURE OF RELEASE OF RECORDS 

A. Copies of Material in Record 

1. Transcripts are released only upon written consent of the student 
or parents of dependent students (as per Paragraph #99.30 of the 
Buckley Amendment). 

2. There is no charge for the first two transcripts. A $2.00 fee for 
each additional copy should accompany each additional request. 

3. If a student or parent of dependent student cannot have access to 
record (i.e. lives too far away) copies may be made and the fee 
schedule for transcripts (A. 2) will be applied. (As per Paragraph 
#99.1 1 of the Buckley Amendment). 

B. The Privacy Act classifies the following as "Directory Information" 
which may be released without the student's consent, unless the 
student has specifically requested that some or all of the information 
not be released: 

1. Address (not over the telephone) 

2. Dates of attendance 

3. Date and place of birth 

4. Major field of study 

5. Weight and height of members of athletic teams 

6. Degrees and awards received 

7. Educational institution attended 

A student must submit to the Registrar's Office a written notice 
stating which of the above items is not to be released to the 
general public. 

77 



Policies 



C. Palm Beach Junior College forwards education records on request to a 
school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll. 

RIGHT TO HAVE AND PROCEDURE FOR CONDUCTING A HEARING 

A. If a student feels that there is an error in the permanent record, the 
student should contact the Office of the Registrar to arrange for a 
hearing. 

B. A hearing will be conducted accordingly as per Paragraph #99.22 of the 
Buckley Amendment. 

1. The hearing will be within a reasonable period of time after the 
request is received. 

2. The parent or eligible student shall be given notice of date, place 
and time reasonable in advance. 

3. A written decision shall be made by the educational institution 
within a reasonable period of time after the hearing. The written 
decision and summary shall be based on evidence presented and 
reasons for the decision. 



UNPAID ACCOUNTS 

Unpaid student accounts to the College will be considered cause for cancellation of 
registration, graduation, granting of credit, or release of transcript. 

PREREQUISITES 

A student who registers for any course for which he has not completed the 
prerequisites must consult with the chairperson of the department offering the 
course. The chairperson may make the decision to remove the student from the 
course; move the student to the prerequisite course; or allow the student to remain in 
the course. 

REGULATION CHANGES 

Any statement in this catalog is subject to change by the Administrative Committee of 
the College. 

REPEATED COURSES AND ACADEMIC AVERAGE 

As of December 1970, only the last attempt of a repeated course is used in Quality 
point average computation. 

No student may repeat a course in which he has previously earned a grade of "C" or 
better, except on an audit basis. 

The forgiveness policy pertains only up to the time of the awarding of the AA degrees 
and does not extend beyond that time. 

CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 

A maximum of 15 semester hours of correspondence credit may be accepted provided: 

(1) The course was administered by a regionally accredited institution. 

(2) The minimum grade "C" was earned. 

(3) The credit is acceptable by the institution offering the correspondence 
course toward one of its own degrees. 

(4) None of the final 15 semester hours before graduation may be through 
correspondence. 

Palm Beach Junior College does not offer correspondence courses. 



78 



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Educational Opportunities 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 

CEU OFFERINGS. ................. 

COMMUNITY SERVICES. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION PROJECTS 
COOPERATIVE EDUCATION ......... 

INTERNATIONAL/INTERCULTURAL 
EDUCATION 



Continuing Education 

Continuing Education 

Continuing Education at Palm Beach Junior College has grown to a 
multi-campus operation of educational and related services which 
exist in several formats. These include programs, courses and 
projects. The majority of such activities are non-credit, although 
credit offerings are available under the sphere of Continuing 
Education. 

CONTINUING EDUCATION 
OFFERINGS 

Palm Beach Junior College offers occupational, developmental, and 
non-occupational (citizenship and avocational) Continuing Education 
programs, courses and projects. 

Occupational 

Occupational offerings are available in the areas of agriculture, distributive, health 
occupations education, home economics, office occupations, trade and industrial 
occupations, and public service. Continuing education units (CEU's) may be earned for 
satisfactory completion of the programs and courses. These courses are scheduled 
throughout the year when there is a demand. Individuals and organizations are invited 
to suggest programs which might be developed through cooperative planning with the 
college. Palm Beach Junior College provides classroom facilities, equipment, 
materials, professional consultants and instructors for the development and im- 
plementation of programs of study. 

The following non-credit occupational offerings were scheduled in 1980-81. 

AGRICULTURE 
Horticulture Maintenance Lawn & Ornamental Pest Control 

Landscape Maintenance Plant Materials 

Lawn & Golf Green Management Plant Propagation 

Lawn Maintenance Turf Grass Short Course 

DISTRIBUTIVE 



Assertive Business Communication 
Bandits-Bunco & Banking 
Calligraphy-Beginning 
Calligraphy-Intermediate 
Condominium Operations 
Executive Housekeeping 
First Level Management 
Goal Setting 

Going Into Business For Yourself 
Imagination In Action 
Intermediate Travel Agency Procedures 
Introduction to Travel Agency 
Procedures 



Mind Your Own Business 

Personal Development 

Professional Salesmanship 

R.E. Post-Registration 

Real Estate Exam Review 

Real Estate Math Review 

Real Estate Sales Training 

Shoplifting Prevention 

Stock Market & Investment Techniques 

Tax-Individual 

Tax-Small Business Payroll Tax 

Wills, Trusts & Estates 



80 



Continuing Education 



HEALTH OCCUPATIONS EDUCATION 



coholism 

•thritis Review and Update 
asic Electrocardiography 
asic Rehabilitation Nursing 
ient Centered Counseling 
ommunication Skills 
oronary Care Refresher 
oronary Care Rehabilitation 
abetes: Management of a Patient 
saster Nursing 

ye Disorders-Care & Treatment 
ealth Education Needs of the 

Pre-Natal Patients 
eart and Lung Assessment 
istory of Health Care in the U.S. 
olistic Approach to Stress 
egal Aspects of Charting for Nurses 
egal Aspects of Nursing Care 
terpersonal Communications 
laternal and Infant Nutrition 
ledical Radiation Fundamentals 
letric System for Medication 

Administration 
urse Refresher Course 
ursing Care of the Cancer Patient 



Nursing Care of Renal Disease Patient 
Nursing Intervention in Orthopedics 
Nursing Assessment of Multiple 

Systems 
Nutrition and the Aging Process 
Operating Room Techniques 
Orthopedic Nursing Conference 
Paramedic Certification Examination 

Review 
Parkinson's Disease 
Patient Teaching 
Pharmacology Update for Nurses 
Problem Oriented Medical Record 
Professional Development and Job 

Satisfaction for Dental Hygienists 
Psychology of Aging 
Respiratory Nursing 
Reality Therapy 

Sensory Deprivation in the Elderly 
Skin Disorders 
Stress and Its Management 
Stroke 

Understanding the Aging Patient 
Writing Patient Care Plans 



HOME ECONOMICS 



leginning Basic Food Preparation 

for Bachelors 
hild Development I 
hild Development II 
Creative Learning Materials 
reative Physical Education 

Activities 
)ecorative Machine Stitchery 
)eveloping Math Concepts for 

Early Learners 



Effective Classroom Techniques for 

Child Care Personnel 
Food and Beverage Service Training 
Food Service Seminar Series 
Interior Decorating 
Positive Approaches to Discipline 
Sanitation and Safety for Food 

Service Personnel 
Science Activities for Pre-School 

Children 



OFFICE OCCUPATIONS 



Computer Assist Dispatch 
Ixecutive Secretary Training 
rttegrated Information Management 
eadership Skills for Office 

Supervisors 
.egal Assistants Exam Review 



Office Typing Refresher 
Secretary Refresher I 
Word Processing Concepts 
Word Processing Systems 



81 



Continuing Education 

wcexm 




TRADE AND INDUSTRIAL OCCUPATIONS 



Air Conditioning & Refrigeration 
Commercial (HARV) 

Air Conditioning Refrigeration 
Residential 

AVONobleWinesl&ll 

Contractor-Building & General 

Contractor-Residential 

Fine Print 

Journeyman Electrician 

Journeyman Plumber 

Master Electrician 

Navigation-Celestial 



Navigation-Chart & Compass 

& Electronic 
Photo Sensitometry 
Review for Mechanical Engineers 
Solid-State Electronics 
Technical Review for Civil 

Engineers I 
Technical Review for Civil 

Engineers II 
Technical Review for Electrical 

Engineers 
Water & Pollution Control 
Zone System Photography 

PUBLIC SERVICE 

Breathalyzer Refresher 

Breathalyzer Technician 

Career Development Officer-lnt. 

Career Development Officer-Refresher 

Criminal Law 

Crisis/Stress Management 

Effective Communication 

Employer-Employee Communication 

Executive Development 

First Responders Course 

Police Instructor Training 

Police Mid-Management 

Police Photography 

Police Supervision 

Public Safety Dispatching- 

Basic Introduction 
Role of Elected Officials 
Sexual Assault on Children 
Street Law 
White Collar Crime 



Accident Investigation 
Advanced Arson Investigation 
Advanced Latent Print Examiner 
Auxiliary Recruit Training 
Basic Latent Print Examiner 
Basic Arson Investigation 
Basic Police Recruit Refresher 
Basic Standard Corrections Officer 
Basic Standard Recruit 
Breathalyzer Maintenance 
Institute of Governments 

(Courses to be announced) 
Intro, to Computer Related Crimes 
Jail Seminar 

Lawyer-Land Surveyor Conference 
Leadership Seminars 
Major Case Investigation 
Mechanic's Liens 
Organized Crime Seminar for 

Police Executives 
Parking Enforcement Specialists 

DEVELOPMENTAL 

Non-credit courses in reading and math are available to all students currently enroll! 
at the college. 



82 



Continuing Education 



CITIZENSHIP 



jrobic Movement 

kido 

coholism: A Family Illness 

coholism and the Elderly 

pha-Genics 

ssertive Communication 
sertive Communication-Advanced 

ssertiveness in Personal Development 

asic Income Tax 

eginning Sign Language 

oating Safety 

rain Behavior & Human Dynamics 

areer and Life Planning 

autious Consumer 

PR For Laymen 

hina Today 

ommunication Effectiveness Training 

ommunication Skills for the Working 
Woman 

ontinued Living and Adaptation 

oordinators Training-Adult and 
Community Education 

oping Skills for the Mentally Han- 
dicapped 

reative Artistic Development- 
Handicapped 

risis Line 

aily Living Skills 

efensive Driving 

ress For Success 

river Education 

river Improvement Program 

xploring Contemporary Male and 
Female Roles 

amily Financial Planning 

inancial Decision Making 

or Better or Worse, But Not for Lunch 

rom Fog to Focus 

ireat Decisions 

iave a Happy, Healthy Baby 

ealthy Food for Later Years 

ome Security 



Hunter & Firearm Safety 

Individual Basic Income Tax 

Individuality Through Interior Decorating 

Interpersonal Relationships 

Job Re-Entry Skills For Women 

Judeo-Christian Beliefs 

Know Your Car 

Legal Rights for Women 

Managing Stress 

Mental Retardation Seminar 

New Directions for Women 

Palm Beach County & Its Resources 

Parents in Need-Child Abuse 

Performing Arts-Mentally and Physically 
Handicapped — Dance 

Personal Adjustment for the Han- 
dicapped 

Physical Education for the Physically 
Handicapped 

Physically Disabled and You 

Problems of Adjustment in Later Years 

Reading & Math Skills For Parents 

Real Estate For Consumers 

Self-Concept Enhancement 

Self-Defense For Women 

Seminar For Area Drug Abuse Council 

Sewing For the Working Woman 

Sexual Assault Awareness 

Test-Taking Skills 

The Art of Love 

Transitional Learning For the Mentally 
Handicapped 

Triumph of Age 

Typing For the Blind 

Understanding Human Sexuality 

Understanding Self 

Wide Tracks of the Palm Beaches 
(Wheelchair Basketball) 

Writing Your Life History 

You and Your Preschool Child 

Your Legal Rights as a Disabled In- 
dividual 

Youthful Aging 



83 



Continuing Education 



AVOCATIONAl 



Beginning Basic Food Preparation for 

Bachelors 
Bridge — Beginning 
Bridge — Intermediate 
Cake Decorating 
Calligraphy — Beginning 
Calligraphy — Intermediate 
Creative Writing 
Crocheting 

Dance As a Creative Outlet 
Financial Roundtable 
Ikebana — Japanese Flower Arranging 
Individualized Development 
Interior Decorating I 
Interior Decorating II 

COMMUNITY 



Mime 

Noble Wines I 

Noble Wines II 

Public Speaking for the Professio| 

Woman 
Quilting forthe Beginner 
Relaxation — A Workshop for Men 
Tai Chi 

The Holocaust — An Overview 
Teaching the New Testament Content | 
Tole Painting 
Trading of Listed Options 
Weaving 
Yoga 

SERVICES 



Palm Beach Junior College facilities are available for approved community educatiol 
and cultural functions. Many college cultural and entertainment activities, suchf 
concerts, dramatic presentations, art exhibits, lectures and sports events 
scheduled throughout the year, and are frequently available to the community. Sol 
events are free of charge to the public. Others charge enough to help defray expens 
or to raise scholarship funds. 

Continuing Education Projects 

INSTITUTE OF NEW DIMENSIONS 

This project is dedicated to the exploration of educational an 
cultural enrichment opportunities by adults, especially retiree 
through courses, seminars, forums, field trips, and lectures. It is 
cooperative venture of volunteers from the arts, sciences ar 
professions whose purpose is to bring intellectual enrichment to t\ 
community. The Institute is popular with senior citizens. 

INSTITUTE OF GOVERNMENTS 

Responsive to the needs expressed by municipalities, the Institute 
Governments, partially funded by a federal grant, was established 
1980. The primary purpose of the Institute is to plan and provi( 
educational opportunities to elected officials and employees of loc 
governments. 

The educational programs include both credit and non-credit 
ferings. The college has developed a two year Associate of Art 
degree program in Public Administration. Non-credit Continuin 
Education programs with C.E.U. credits are offered by means of sho 
courses, seminars and conferences. The focus of the A.A. cred 
program is a transfer degree and the focus of the non-credit prograr 
is improvement of occupational skills. 

A.A. DEGREE COURSES OFFERED IN 1980-81 

PAD 1002-190 7752 Intro to Public Administration 
PAD 1416-190 7751 Local Personnel Administration 

84 



Continuing Education 




WOM£N'S CENTER 

le purpose of the Women's Center is to provide services to the 
mmunity for women in transition. The Center provides: 1) in- 
rmation and referral services to assist women in information about 
mmunity resources; 2) individual counseling to assist women in 
reer goals; and 3) educational services to enable women to par- 
:ipate in short courses, workshops, and seminars unique to 
)men's needs. 

CENTER FOR MULTICULTURAL AFFAIRS 

le Center for Multi-Cultural Affairs was established in 1980 to meet 
e need of providing an understanding and preserving the heritage 
the multi-cultural groups within the community. An advisory 
mmittee has defined three objectives for the Center: establish- 
ed of a clearinghouse for exchange of multi-cultural information, 
velopment of multi-cultural programs and activities for students 
d representatives from cultural groups in college and community 
ograms. 

MULTI-MEDIA INSTRUCTION 

urses by television, radio and newspaper carry college transfer 
edit. The courses are offered in the Fall and Winter terms. Each 
ree-semester credit course may be audited but does not qualify for 
Senior Citizens special registration. Veterans should have ap- 
oval from the Veteran counselor to apply for benefits. The in- 
ruction for each course by television and radio utilizes a video or 
idio broadcast received in the home, a text/study guide, three 
quired and several optional campus discussion/review meetings, 
If-tests and personal telephone contact with the instructor. The 

urses by newspaper combine weekly newspaper articles with a 
ader/study guide and instructor lecture/discussion groups. Three 
impus meetings are required. Additionally, there are three optional 
eetings for discussion and review. 



Palm Beach Junior College 



85 



Continuing Education 



REAL ESTATE 



The college, through Continuing Education, provides a cor 
prehensive real estate education program leading to an associa 
degree. All courses required for salesman and broker state licenj 
and post-licensure are available. The following courses are offers 
for credit or audit (non-credit): 

Abstracts and Titles I 

Abstracts and Titles II 

Co-op Real Estate I 

Co-op Real Estate II 

Real Estate Appraisal 

Real Estate Finance 

Real Estate For Bankers 

Real Estate Principles and Practices 

BRE-I (Salespersons) 

Real Estate Principles and Practices 

BRE II (Brokers) 

Additionally, the college offers the following non-credit short courses: 

Monthly: 

Post-Registration (Required BRE 14 hour course for license renewal) 

Each Term (Fall, Winter, Spring): 

Math Review for License Applicants 

Fall and Winter Terms: 

Real Estate For Consumers 
Condominium Operations and Management 

As Needed: 

Commercial and Investment Real Estate 

SREA Appraising - 1 

Federal Taxes Affecting the Sale of Residential Real Estate 

Real Estate Sales Training 

Real Estate courses are available at the Central Campus in Lake Worth and P.B.J. C 
North (Palm Beach Gardens), P.B.J.C. - South (Boca Raton), and P.B.J. C. - Glades (Bel 
Glade). For further information call the Office of Continuing Education at 439-8006. 



INSURANCE 

The college provides courses in general insurance, Charters 
Property, Casualty Underwriters (CPCU) and Chartered Life Ui 
derwriters (CLU). Refer to Insurance in the Index. 



86 



Co-op /Global Education 




Cooperative Education (CO-OP) 

operative Education is a unique plan of educational enrichment. It 
designed to make a student's educational program more relevant 
meaningful by integrating classroom study with supervised on- 
job practical experience in business, industrial, government or 
vice-type work situations. In addition to gaining valuable practical 
)erience while attending college, students receive salaries and 
idemic training assignments. Cooperative courses are available in 
st disciplines and training assignment credits are transferrable to 
ite universities in Florida. 

ibility: Continuing CO-OP students must maintain a cumulative quality point 
rage of not less than 2.0. 

dits: A maximum of twelve (12) CO-OP training assignment semester hours are 
eptable toward an Associate degree. Permission of the department chairperson or 
ilty coordinator and cooperative education coordinator is required before 
ollment. Each part-time training assignment earns three semester hours of 
demic credit. Two three-semester hour training assignments may be combined 
currently for an approved full-time on-the-job learning experience (6 semester 
rs). CO-OP credits may replace electives or may be course equivalencies; per- 
sion is to be obtained from the department chairperson or faculty coordinator. 

tificate Programs: Cooperative Education training assignments are approved for 
ain certificate programs. Students should consult with the appropriate department 
iirperson or coordinator for specific information regarding eligible training 
ignments. 



87 



Intemational/intercultural 
Education 

Palm Beach Junior College recognizes its increasing responsibil 
to become more involved in intemational/intercultural educatk 
The College sees its role as providing the opportunity for studen 
faculty, staff and members of the community to learn more abc 
themselves, to learn more about the world in which they live and 
enrich their lives personally and professionally. These opportuniti 
can make a major contribution to their role as a responsible citizen 

The Board of Trustees has a deepening commitment to 
ternational/intercultural education and sees as its task t 
development of institution-wide awareness of college programs tl 
will contribute to international education. 

The objectives of intemational/intercultural educationare: 

1. To provide the student and the community with the 
portunity to broaden their intemational/intercultural 
derstanding and learning experiences. 

2. To become involved in international experiences whi 
contribute to the professional enrichment of faculty a 
staff. 

3. To provide more effective inter-relationships to internatior 
students on campus. 

4. To increase awareness of international/intercultu 
education. 




88 




How to Choose 
Your Program 



NON-DEGREE PROGRAMS 

ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE . . . 

ASSOCIATE IN ARTS. ......... 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

HELP IN MAKING 

YOUR CHOICE....... 

DEPARTMENTS AND MAJORS 

LIST.. ;. 

UNIVERSITY PARALLEL 

MAJORS LIST. ..., 

SPECIALIZED, BUSINESS, 

TECHNICAL AND PROFESSIONAL 

MAJORS LIST. ............... 

COURSE NUMBERING SYSTEM . 



Non-Degree Programs 

How to Choose Your Program 

In making your decision to seek a college education, one of the basic 
questions you need to answer is: "How long do I plan to stay in 
college?" At PBJC, more than half the students plan initially to stay 
in college for four years — two years at PBJC and two years at some 
other college or university. They are all enrolled in "University 
Parallel" courses, leading to an Associate in Arts Degree. If you are 
planning to obtain a four-year college degree, or more, you should 
read carefully the section under Associate in Arts Degree below: 

Many students feel that they need additional training beyond high 
school, but are aiming for mid-management levels in some business 
or profession. A growing number of PBJC students plan to stay in 
college for only two years, completing their formal college education 
at PBJC in a "Specialized, Business, Technical, Professional 
Program" and earning an Associate in Science Degree. If you are one 
of these, you should read the section under Associate in Science 
below. 

The third broad category of PBJC students are not interested in a 
degree from college and should read the section below called "Non- 
Degree Programs." Some of these students will be interested in the 
one-year programs offered by the college. Others will be persons 
who want more out of life, and know they can attain this end through 
education, but have no need for formal recognition of their academic 
efforts. These students should read the material under "Continuing 
Education" in the "This is PBJC" section. 

Non-Degree Programs 

A student who does not desire a degree may work out whatever in- 
dividual program suits his own educational need. He may register for 
one or more courses in the day or in the evening. 

The college offers a growing number of formalized non-degree 
programs, with certificates awarded upon successful completion. A 
list of these non-degree programs, and the page number where ad- 
ditional information may be obtained follows.. 

Air Conditioning and Refrigera- Early Childhood 

tion Specialist 189 Education Aides 268 

Basic Standard Corrections Emergency Medical Tech 

Officer .... (See Dept. Chairperson) Paramedic 240 

Basic Standard Police Recruit Fire Science Technology 187 

Program . . . (See Dept. Chairperson) Popular Music and Jazz 

Building Construction Specialists 215 

Management 182 Surveyor Technician 189 

Dental Assisting 174 Water and Wastewater 

Drafting Specialist 189 Technology 252 

90 



Associate in Science 

Associate in Science 

The degree of Associate in Science is awarded upon successful 
completion of a two-year Specialized, Business, Technical, 
Professional or General Studies Program approved by the College. 
The aim of the occupationally oriented A.S. Degree program is to fit 
the student for immediate entry into the business, professional or 
industrial life of the community with a degree of training which 
would lead to mid-management levels. 

If your answer to the question, "How long do I plan to stay in 
College?" is, "Not more than two years," you should make your 
selection of program from those listed below in the Specialized, 
Business, Technical and Professional list. If you plan to stay in 
college for four or more years, you should look under the University 
Parallel list. 

It is important to note that students who choose Associate in 
Science Degree programs are NOT qualifying themselves for transfer 
to the junior year at a State University. If a combination of immediate 
job training plus possible continuation for a four-year degree is 
desired, it is better to plan your program with a guidance counselor, 
using a University Parallel program as a base. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR A.S. DEGREE 

All students who wish to graduate from Palm Beach Junior College must fulfill the 
eight requirements listed under the general heading "Graduation Requirements." 
Students are expected to complete all the courses in the program in which they are 
registered. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR A.S. DEGREE* 

Students must complete the specific courses in General Education listed below.** 

Area I COMMUNICATIONS 6 Hours 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 6 

ENC 1313 Technical Writing 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Area V SOCIAL SCIENCES 6 Hours 

SOC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

AND 
POS 1001 Introduction to Political Science 3 

OR 
POS 2041 American Nat'l Gov't 3 

OR 
AMH 2010 U.S. History to 1865 3 

* It will be noted that General Education requirements for the A.S. degree are considerably relaxed from the rigid 
specifications necessary for the Associate in Arts Degree. Students enrolled in A.S. degree programs who do not 
meet all A. A. degree requirements, may complete 36 hours of General Education and have this noted on transcript, 
PROVIDED the Registrar is notified of this intention when the student applies for A.S. degree. See "Alternate or 
Second Degree" following "Associate in Arts." 

* * Some specialized occupational programs do not need to meet all of the above General Education requirements. 
However, all courses listed in program outlines in the catalog must be completed in their entirety. 

91 



Associate in Arts 

Associate in Arts 

If you have any intention of going to college for four years, you 
should choose your course from the University Parallel list below, 
and complete all requirements for the Associate in Arts Degree at 
Palm Beach Junior College. The excellent record made by PBJC 
students in four-year colleges and universities throughout the U.S 
and abroad had been maintained by the academic standards set for 
this degree. The student must expect strict adherence to these 
standards. 

While all state universities in Florida will accept as Juniors most 
students who have completed an A. A. Degree at Palm Beach Junior 
College, completion of the degree does not always qualify for ad- 
mission to the junior year in certain schools and colleges within the 
Universities. Each college has specific course requirements which 
must be met. 

If you plan to go into a College of Arts and Sciences, for instance, 
you should include two years of a foreign language at PBJC! Some 
colleges require two years each of biological and physical sciences. 
It is important that you investigate transfer requirements in the 
school or college you plan to attend as early as possible, in order to 
fit the proper courses into your program at PBJC. 

GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS FOR A.A. DEGREE 

Read carefully the eight steps under the general heading 
"Graduation Requirements." Students bear the primary respon- 
sibility for meeting all these requirements. 

GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS FOR A.A. DEGREE 

You must complete a minimum of 36 semester hours of work in the 
seven subject areas as specific below. 

Note that the general education requirement has already been 
worked into the programs listed in the last section of this catalog. A 
student must earn a cumulative "C" (2.0) for all subjects, in order to 
graduate. 

Area I: COMMUNICATIONS — 6 hours minimum: 

ENC1103 ( ) ENC1136 ( ) 
Area II: MATHEMATICS — 3 hours minimum: 

MGF1113 ( ) MAT 1033 ( ) MAC 1104 ( ) MAC 1144 ( ) 
MAC 2411 ( ) MAC 2412 ( ) MAC 2413 ( ) MAP 2302 ( ) 
STA2014 ( ) 



92 



Associate in Arts 



SCIENCES — 6 hours minimum: 



APB1190L ( 

BSC1010L ( 

BOT1053L ( 

ZOO1013L ( 

CHM 1045L ( 

PHY 2024 ( 

PHY2049L ( 



) APB1191 
) BOT1010 
) MCB1000 
) CHM 1015 
) CHM 1046 
) PHY 2048 
) PSC1513 



( ) 

( ) 

( ) 

( ) 

( ) 

( ) 

( ) 



APB1120 ( ) APB1190 ( ) 

APB1191L ( ) BSC1010 ( ) 

BOT1010L ( ) BOT1053 ( ) 

MCB1000L ( ) ZO0 1013 ( ) 

CHM1015L ( ) CHM 1045 ( ) 

CHM1046L ( ) PHY 2023 ( ) 

PHY2048L ( ) PHY 2049 ( ) 

PSC1341 ( ) PSC1341L ( ) 

HUMANITIES 

A. 3 hours minimum: 

ARH 1000 ( ) ARH 1955 
MUL1011 ( ) MUL1955 

B. 3 hours minimum: 

AML2020 ( ) AML2022 
LIT 2215 ( ) LIT 2224 

SOCIAL SCIENCES 

A. 3 hours: 

SOC1200 ( ) 

B. 3 hours minimum: 
AMH2010 ( ) POS1001 
RELATED HEALTH — 2 hours minimum: 
HES1000 ( ) HES2121 ( ) 
ELECTIVES — 7 hours minimum: 

Any of the courses listed above in excess of number required for that area 
and/or: 



( ) ARH 2050 

( ) MUH2111 

( ) ENL2015 

( ) 



( ) ARH 2051 ( ) 
( ) 



( ) ENL2020 ( ) 



( ) POS2041 ( ) 



ART 








ART 1201 ( ) 


ART 1300 ( 


) 




BUSINESS 








BUL2111 ( ) 


BUL2112 ( 


) ECO 2013 


( ) ECO 2023 


ENGLISH 








ENG2910 ( ) 


ENG2911 ( 


) ENG2912 


( ) FRE 1100 


FRE1101 ( ) 


FRE 2200 ( 


) FRE 2201 


( ) PHI 1100 


SPC 1600 ( ) 


SPN 1100 ( 


) SPN 1101 


( ) SPN 2200 


SPN 2201 ( ) 


THE 1000 ( 


) 




MUSIC 








MUT1001 ( ) 








SCIENCES 








PCB 2063 ( ) 


PCB 2063 L ( 


) 




SOCIAL SCIENCE 








AMH 2020 ( ) 


POS2112 ( 


) SOC2000 


) WOH 1012 


WOH 1022 ( ) 


POS1001 ( 


) POS2041 


) AMH 2010 


AMH 2580 ( ) 


ANT 2000 ( 


) DEP2102 


) EDP2002 


EGC2120 ( ) 


GE0 1010 ( 


) LAH2130 


) LAH2131 


MAF 2001 ( ) 


PHI 1000 ( 


) PSY2012 


) REL1210 


REL2300 ( ) 


REL1243 ( 


) SOP 2740 


) SOC2020 


ASN 2000 ( ) 









( ) 
( ) 
( ) 



93 



Graduation Requirements 

Graduation Requirements 

General requirements for graduation from Palm Beach Junior 
College must be met by all students, without regard to the degree to 
be granted. Final responsibility for meeting the requirements for 
graduation for either the Associate in Arts degree or the Associate in 
Science degree rests with the student. 

(1) Students must complete 62 semester hours with 60 
semester hours of academic work exclusive of oc- 
cupational courses. 

(2) All students must earn the last 15 credits at PBJC. 
Neither transfer nor CLEP credits satisfy this residence 
requirement. In all cases, graduation must follow a term 
in which the student is in attendance. Dates for the final 
application for graduation are listed in the college 
calendar in the Bulletin. It is the responsibility of the 
student to meet the deadline. 

(3) A cumulative grade point average of not less than 2.0 or 
"C" must be achieved in all work attempted by all 
students and a 2.0 cumulative grade point average on all 
work at PBJC. 

(4) All regular students will be required to complete two 
semester hours in a physical education activity. Ex- 
ceptions to this requirement are: adults who have reached 
their thirty-fifth birthday, veterans with two years of 
service of other than reserve, students enrolled in evening 
classes, and students enrolled in certain specialized 
programs. Other students may be excused from the 
physical education program or a part thereof by a medical 
certificate. 

Two semester hour physical education courses are for 
Physical Education majors only and will not satisfy 
graduation requirements for other majors. 

(5) The Health course graduation requirement may be met by 
either HES 1000, Perspectives on Healthful Living, or HES 
2121, Life Science and Health. (Not required for Nursing 
(A.S.) or Dental Health graduates). This graduation 
requirement may also be met by satisfactorily passing the 
Departmental Health Knowledge Test. All students 
become eligible to take this exam by paying the current 
matriculation fee. 



94 



Graduation Requirements 

(6) Students must make formal application for graduation on 
the form furnished by the Registrar and filled out by the 
academic advisor. 

(7) Participation in graduation exercises is expected of all 
graduates who are eligible for graduation at end of Winter 
Term. The application must be presented and the 
graduation fee paid at the time the student registers for 
his final term. 

(8) General Education requirements as specified under 
Associate in Science and Associate in Arts above. 
Completion of General Education requirements cannot 
be certified until all other requirements of the degree 
have been met. 

(9) To obtain full benefit of articulation agreements between 
Palm Beach Junior College and Florida state university 
systems, a student must fulfill all graduation 
requirements for an Associate of Arts (AA) degree. 

(10) The Articulation Agreement between Florida colleges and 
universities states that after August 31, 1972 students 
receiving an AA Degree must have 60 semester hours of 
ACADEMIC WORK EXCLUSIVE OF OCCUPATIONAL 
COURSES. General education certification of an ap- 
proved program of not less than 36 semester hours is 
required. 



Alternate or Second Degrees 

Occasionally a student will wish to earn both the A.S. and the A. A. Degree from PBJC. 
This can be done, but requires 15 additional credits after the first degree is awarded, 
plus completion of all requirements for both degrees. 

Sometimes students who discover near graduation that they have not completed all 
requirements for the A. A. Degree, but can graduate with an A.S., choose to accept the 
A.S. in order to graduate with classmates. As explained in the footnote under "A.S. 
Degree" this is perfectly acceptable as a procedure. An A.S. granted in this way does 
not require the completion of all of the requirements of any one of the standard 
Specialized, Business, Technical and Professional programs. 

Students who adopt this procedure sometimes return for an additional term to com- 
plete general education requirements before transferring to a university. The Registrar 
must be notified in writing on a General Education form of student's intention to work 
toward General Education requirements. Such a procedure does not allow the con- 
ferring of a second degree unless a total of 15 credit hours have been earned beyond 
those required for the first degree. 



95 



Help in Making Your Choice 




Help in Making Your Choice 

The entire faculty at Palm Beach Junior College is utilized in an effort 
to match each student with the program best suited to meet his 
educational objectives. Students fall into major groups, and these 
two groups go for help to different members of the faculty. 

STUDENTS WHO KNOW THEIR MAJOR AREA OF INTEREST 

If you have defined your educational goals to the point where you can 
select your major area of interest, you will be advised by members of 
the faculty to the department of your major. The index of Depart- 
ments and Majors below will lead you to the listing for your depart- 
ment in the last section of the catalog. There you will find the faculty 
advisors for your major listed, as well as the suggested program in 
your major. 

MAJOR FIELD UNDECIDED 

While it is important for you to choose your major field as early as 
possible, it is recognized by the college that many students can not 
yet make this decision, and others may discover they have made a 
wrong choice. 

A staff of guidance counselors is available in the Student Personnel 
Department to assist the undecided student in making out a 
satisfactory program. Information on career opportunities and four- 
year colleges and universities is available at the counseling center. 

96 



Departments and Majors 

Departments and Majors 

01) ART DEPARTMENT 

kA-002. Advertising Design 109 

WV-003. Architecture 110 

tA-001. Art Education 110 

^A-008. Art History 111 

^S-010. Commercial & Graphic Arts 112 

^A-006. Fine Arts (Drawing, Painting, Sculpture) 112 

VA-005. Interior Design 113 

kS-012. Interior Design 114 

WV-004. Photography 114 

02) BIOLOGY SECTION SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

^A-031. Bacteriology 250 

<A-026. Biology, General 254 

\A-027. Biology Teacher ., 246 

kA-035. Marine Biology 255 

\A-028. Plant Sciences (Agri.) 251 

\A-029. Science Education 246 

\S-199. Water& Wastewater Tech 252 

\A-033. Wild Life, Conservation 250 

\A-034. Zoology 250 

03) BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

\S-075. Banking 122 

^A-052. Business Administration 122 

^A-056. Business Teacher 123 

^S-066. Clerical Practice 124 

HA-071. Clothing & Textile 142 

IVA-074. Dietetics 143 

^S-058. Executive Secretary 124 

<\S-073. Fashion 126 

AA-507. Fashion Design&Fashion Marketing 126 

fcS-055. Fashion Merchandising 127 

AS-068. Food Service Mgmt 128 

AS-057. General Business 129 

AS-072. General Home Economics 129 

AA-501. Home Economics 130 

AS-060. Hospitality Management 131 

AS-504. Insurance 132 

AA-508. International Business 134 

AS-505. Legal Assistant 134 

AS-062. Marketing&Management 135 

AA-509. Public Administration 136 

AS-503. Real Estate 149 

(04) CHEMISTRY SECTION SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

AA-076. Chemistry 261 

AA-077. Chemistry Teacher 257 

AA-079. Pre-Dental 258 

AA-078. Pre-Medical 258 

AA-082. Pre-Optometry 260 

AA-080. Pre-Pharmacy 258 

AA-083. Pre-Podiatry 259 

AA-081. Pre-Vet. Medical 258 

97 



Departments and Majors 

(05) COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT 

AA-101. English, English Teacher, Creative Writing 158 

AA-202. Foreign Language Teacher 159 

AA-201. Foreign Languages 159 

AA-104. Journalism 159 

AA-105. Liberal Arts 158 

AA-107. Public Relations 159 

AA-103. Speech — Drama 16(j 

AA-109. Speech Pathology & Audiology 16C| 

(07) DENTAL HEALTH SERVICES 

CT-153. Dental Assistant 174 

AS-151. Dental Hygienist. 172 

AS-152. Dental Lab. Tech 173 

(08) ENGINEERING DEPARTMENT 

CT-182. Air Cond. & Refrig. Spec 189 

AS-183. AirCond. & Refrig. Tech 180 

AS-188. Automotive Technology 181 

AA-185. Building Construction 190 

AS-198. Building Construction Mgmt 182 

AS-197. Commercial Pilot Technology 183 

AA-127. Computer Science 190,191 

AS-126. Computer Technology 184 

AS-178. Drafting & Design Technology 189 

CT-181. Drafting Specialist 189 

AS-177. Electronic Technology 185 

AA-176. Engineering 192 

AS-195. Fire Science 187 

AA-184. Industrial Arts 193 

AS-179. Land Surveying Tech. 188 

CT-187. Surveyor's Aid 189 

(10) PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

AA-227. Physical Education 230 

(11) MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT 

AA-251. Mathematician 208 

AA-253. Mathematics Teacher 209 

(12) MUSIC DEPARTMENT 

AS-278. Music 214 

AA-276. Music, Music Education 213 

AS-279. Popular Music and Jazz 215 

CT-280. Popular Music and Jazz >: 216 

(13) NURSING DEPARTMENT 

AS-301. Nursing 224 

AA-302. Pre-Nursing 226 



98 



Departments and Majors 

14) SOCIAL SCIENCE DEPARTMENT 

^A-324. Anthropology 272 

iVA-344. Early Childhood Education 266 

(\S-342. Early Childhood Education 267 

DT-343. Early Childhood Education 268 

^A-329. Education, Elementary Level 269 

^A-336. Geography 272 

\A-335. Government & Foreign Service 272 

\A-327. History 272 

<VA-339. Political Science 272 

AA-332. Pre-Law 270 

AA-334. Pre-Ministry & Philosophy 271 

&A-331. Psychology 273 

AA-326. Social Science 272 

AA-333. Social Science: International Studies 270 

AA-328. Social Science Teacher 272 

AA-325. Sociology 272 

AA-330. Welfare Worker 272 

(15) LIBRARY 

AA-352. Librarian 207 

(16) STUDENT AFFAIRS DEPARTMENT 

AA-376. Major Field Undeclared 96 

(17) EVENING CLASSES 

17-XXX. Evening students majoring in any of the fields listed will have Major Code 
combined with Evening Department Code 17. 

(18) PHYSICS & PHYSICAL SCIENCE SECTION — SCIENCE 
DEPARTMENT 

AA-402. Astronomy 262 

AA-403. Geology 262 

AA-404. Meteorology 262 

AA-405. Physical Sciences 262 

AA-401. Physics 262 

(19) CRIMINAL JUSTICE DEPARTMENT 

CT-601 . Basic Standard Corrections Off 82,90 

CT-600. Basic Standard Police Recruit 82,90 

AS-424. Criminal Justice 168 

(21) RELATED HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

CT-450. Emergency Medical Tech. — Paramedic 240 

AA-226. Health Education 234 

AS-032. Medical Lab. Technology 236 

AA-036. Medical Technology 235 

AS-340. Mental Health Technology 237 

AA-237. Occupational Therapy 239 

AS-240. Occupational Therapy Assistant 238 

AS-449. Paramedic 240 

AA-228. Physical Therapy 241 

AS-303. Radiological Technology 242 

(22) CONTINUING EDUCATION DEPT. 

22-381. Continuing Education, Non-Credit 80 

99 



University Parallel 



University Parallel 
(Associate in Arts) 

MAJOR 

Accounting 126 

Advertising Design 114 

Anthropology 267 

Architecture 114 

Art Education 115 

Art History 116 

Astronomy 258 

Bacteriology 246 

Biology Teacher 246 

Building Construction 181 

Business Administration 126 

Business Teacher 127 

Chemistry 253 

Chemistry Teacher < . . . 253 

Clothing and Textiles 131 

Computer Science, Business Option 181 

Computer Science, Systems 182 

Conservation 246 

Creative Writing 156 

Dietary Technology , 128 

Early Childhood Education 262 

Economics 126 

Education (Elementary Level) 265 

Education (Secondary Level) 267 

Engineering 183 

English 156 

English Teacher 156 

Fine Arts 116 

Foreign Languages ^ 156 

Foreign Language Teacher 156 

General Biology 246 

Geography 267 

Geology. 258 

Government and Foreign Service 267 

Health Education 230 

History 267 

Home Economics 133 

Industrial Arts 189 

Insurance 126 

Interior Design 117 



100 



University Parallel 

nternational Business 134 

nternational Studies 270 

nternational Trade 126 

lournalism 157 

iberal Arts 156 

ibrarian 205 

Management 126 

Marine Biology 246 

Mathematician 206 

Mathematics Teacher 207 

Medical Technology 232 

Meteorology 258 

Music 211 

Music Education 21 1 

Dccupational Therapy 236 

hilosophy 266 

hotography 119 

hysical Education 226 

hysical Sciences 258 

hysical Therapy 237 

hysics 258 

lant Sciences (Agriculture) 247 

olitical Science 267 

re-Dental 254 

re-Law 265 

re-Medical 254 

re-Ministry 266 

re-Nursing 222 

re-Optometry 256 

re-Pharmacy 154 

re-Podiatry 255 

re-Veterinary 254 

sychology 268 

D ublic Administration 136 

3 ublic Relations 157 

Real Estate 126 

Retailing 126 

Science Education 246 

Social Science 267 

Social Science Teacher 267 

Sociology 267 

Speech-Drama 157 

Speech Pathoiogy and Audiology 158 

Welfare Worker 267 

Zoology 246 



101 



Specialized, Business, Technical, Professional Program 

Specialized, Business, Technical, Professional 

Program 
(Associate in Science) 



MAJOR 

Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology 172 

Automotive Technology 173 

Building Construction Management 174 

Banking 127 

Clerical Practice 128 

Commercial and Graphic Arts — Tech 111 

Commercial Pilot Technology 175 

Computer Technology 176 

Corrections ' 200 

Dental Hygiene 165 

Dental Laboratory Technology 166 

Drafting and Design Technology 176 

Early Childhood Education 262 

Electronics Technology 177 

Executive Secretary 129 

Fashion 130 

Fashion Merchandising 13T 

Fire Science Technology 178 

Food Service Management 128 

General Business 132 

General Home Economics 132 

Hospitality Management 134 

Interior Design — Tech 118 

Land Surveying '. 179 

Law Enforcement 198 

Legal Assistant 136 

Legal Secretary 129 

Medical Laboratory Technology 233 

Mental Health Technology 234 

Music 212 

Nursing 22f 

Occupational Therapy Assistant 238 

Paramedic 240 

Popular Music and Jazz 212 

Radiological Technology 238 

Sales and Marketing 221 

Surveying 179 

Water and Wastewater Technology 248 



102 



Florida's Statewide Course Numbering System 

The course numbers appearing in the catalog are part of a statewide system of 
>refixes and numbers developed for use by all public postsecondary and participating 
jrivate institutions in Florida. One of the major purposes of this system is to make 
ransferring easier by identifying courses which are equivalent, no matter where they 
ire taught in the state. All courses designated as equivalent will carry the same prefix 
md last three digits. 

The classifying and numbering of courses was done by community college and 
jniversity faculty members in each academic discipline. Their work was reviewed by 
acuity members in all of Florida's postsecondary institutions who made suggestions 
»nd criticisms to be incorporated into the system. 

The course numbering system is, by law, descriptive and not prescriptive. It in no way 
imits or controls what courses may be offered or how they are taught. It does not 
affect course titles or descriptions at individual schools. It seeks only to describe what 
s being offered in postsecondary education in Florida in a manner that is intelligible 
nd useful to students, faculty and other interested users of the system. 

The course numbering system was developed so that equivalent courses could be 
accpeted for transfer without misunderstanding. Each public institution is to accept 
for transfer credit any course which carries the same prefix and last three digits as a 

course at the receiving institution. For example, if a student has taken SOC 000 at a 

community college, he cannot be required to repeat SOC 000 at the school to which 

he transfers. Further, credit for any course or its equivalent, as judged by the ap- 
propriate faculty task force and published in the course numbering system, which can 
be used by a native student to satisfy degree requirements at a state university can 
also be used for that purpose by a transfer student regardless of where the credit was 
earned. 

It should be noted that a receiving institution is not precluded from using non- 
equivalent courses for satisfying certain requirements. 

General Rule for Course Equivalencies 

All undergraduate courses bearing the same alpha prefix and last three numbers (and 
alpha suffix, if present) have been agreed upon to be equivalent. For example, an in- 
troductory course in sociology is offered in over 40 postsecondary institutions in 
Florida. Since these courses are considered to be equivalent, each one will carry the 
designator SOC_000. 

First Digit 

The first digit of the course number is assigned by the institution, generally to indicate 
the year it is offered — i.e., 1 indicates freshman year, 2 indicates sophomore year. In 
the sociology example mentioned above, one school which offers the course in the 
freshman year will number it SOC 1000; a school offering the same course in the 
sophomore year will number it SOC 2000. The variance in first numbers does not affect 
the equivalency. If the prefix and last three digits are the same, the courses are sub- 
stantively equivalent. 

Titles 

Each institution will retain its own title for each of its courses. The sociology courses 
mentioned above are titled at different schools "Introductory Sociology, "General 
Sociology," and "Principles of Sociology." The title does not affect the equivalency. The 
courses all carry the same prefix and last three digits; that is what identifies them as 
equivalent. 

103 




iiiiiiiiliuiiiiiii.il 



l^. l i;»' l ||l!l!'<"Mii 

If 

Hill 



Lab Indicators 

Some courses will carry an alpha suffix indicating a lab. The alpha suffixes "L" and 
"C" are used as follows to indicate laboratories. 

"L" means either (a) a course, the contest of which is entirely laboratory or (b) the 
laboratory component of a lecture-lab sequence in which the lab is offered at a dif- 
ferent time/place from the lecture. 

"C" means a combined lecture-lab course in which the lab is offered in conjunction 
with the lecture at the same time/same place. 

Examples: Marine Biology OCB_013 (lecture only) 

OCB_013L (lab only) 
Marine Biology OCB_013C (lecture & lab combined) 

with Lab 

Therefore, OCB_013C is equivalent to OCB_013 plus OCB_013L 

Equivalency of Sequences 

In certain cases, sequences of courses in a given discipline are equivalent rather than 

the individual courses which make up these sequences. (For example, MAC 132, 

_133, _134). In these cases the subject matter topics may not be taught in the same 
sequence, course by course, in several institutions; however, upon completion of the 
full sequence at any of the several institutions, students have completed substantively 
equivalent content. These sequences are clearly identified in the Course Equivalency 
Profiles. 



104 



Explanation of Prefixes and Numbers 

'refixes and numbers in the course numbering system are not chosen are random; 
hey are designed to describe course content in an organized fashion within a 
ilassification system developed for each subject matter area. 

enerally, each of the major classifications in a discipline is represented by a three- 
ilpha prefix. In some cases, one three-alpha prefix has been sufficient for the entire 
liscipline. A discipline may use as many prefixes as necessary to accommodate its 
najor classifications. The logic of the system allows it to be infinitely expandable with 
ninimal disruption to existing numbers. 

listory, for example, has seven prefixes, AFH, African History; AMH, American 
History; ASH, Asian History, EUH, European History; HIS, History-General; LAH, Latin 
American History; and WOH, World History. All history courses in the state will carry 
>ne of these prefixes. 

^ more specific example is AMH 3421. 



Early Florida History 



3road Area 
)f American 
History; part 
)f discipline 
>f History 

Junior level 
offering (at 
this particu- 
lar institu- 
tion) 




In Taxonomy 
for AMH 400 
series indi- 
cates "Areas 
in American 
History" 



In Taxonomy 
for AMH this 
digit indicates 
courses in 
"History of 
Florida" 



Last digit in 
this case refers 
to group of 
equated courses 
dealing with 
"Early History 
of Florida" 



(Local titles are used for each particular course. The last three numbers are used 
o indicate equivalency.) 

["he number of prefixes is a function of the extent of the subclassifications of the given 
subject matter area. 



105 



When this work began there were 920 alpha prefixes in existence; with the new systerr 
there are now 370. As in most states there existed no uniformity in Florida's prefixes 
as indicated by the example below: 

Discipline Before After 

History 20 7 

Sociology 24 3 

Philosophy 23 4 

Religion 17 1 

Mathematics 50 .10 

English 39 6 

Nutrition 38 4 

Although it is true that a student majoring at one of the 38 participating institutions 
may have had only one alpha prefix for his major (e.g., HY-History) and now he will hav( 
seven, all prefixes in the same subject matter areas will be the same throughout these 
institutions. 

A complete inventory of taxonomic listings, equivalent and unique courses has beei 
made available to each academic department of every institution in the state* 
Students, through their local advisors, should use this information in designinj 
programs which will transfer smoothly. 

Exceptions to the Rule for Equivalencies 

The following are exceptions to the general rule for course equivalencies: 

A. All graduate level courses (except those which the faculty and their reviewing 
colleagues have determined to be substantively equivalent with undergraduate 
courses) are not automatically transferable. 

B. All numbers which have a second digit of 9 (Ex.: ART 2905) are "place keeper" 
numbers for such courses as directed independent study, thesis hours, etc. 

Courses with 900 numbers must be evaluated individually and are not 

automatically transferable. 

C. All internships, practicums, clinical experiences and study abroad courses, 
whatever numbers they carry, are not automatically transferable. 

D. Performance or studio coursses in Art, Dance, Theatre, and Music are not 
automatically transferable but must be evaluated individually. 

Authority for Acceptance of Equivalent Courses 

The following amendment to Section 6A-10.24(7) of the Articulation Agreement was 
approved by the Community Colleges Council on Instructional Affairs, the Presidents 
Council, the Division of Community Colleges, the State University System Council of 
Vice Presidents for Academic Affairs, the Council of Presidents and the Board of 
Regents. It was adopted by the State Board of Education on March 7, 1978: " 
Students who earn credit in a course determined by the appropriate faculty task force 
to be equivalent and which is published in the statewide course numbering system, 
and who later transfer to another institution within the system can transfer and use the 
credit in that course at the receiving institution for the same purpose as that course 
can be used by native students who complete the course at the receiving institution." 



106 









BIS 



A 




Deportments, 
Programs ond Courses 



HOW TO USE THIS SECTION . . . 

ART 

BUSINESS 

COMMUNICATIONS 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

DENTAL HEALTH 

ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY . 

LIBRARY 

MATHEMATICS 

MUSIC 

NURSING 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION . . 
RELATED HEALTH PROGRAMS 

SCIENCE.... 

SOCI AL SCIENCE ......... ... 



Departments, Programs, and Courses 

How to Use This Section 

If you have read the preceding section, and have chosen, or are in th 
process of choosing, your area of major interest, you will want ti 
examine the program suggested by your department for the majoi 
You will want to read a description of the course in your program, an< 
choose the electives to meet your own educational objectives 
Follow these simple steps: 

1. Turn to your department. 

Suppose your interest is Art and you want to examine the program 
Commercial and Graphic Arts-Tech. Turn to the Art Department. It is th'i 
first program in this section. 

2. Note the names of your advisors. 

One of the persons listed by the last name following the word "Faculty" wi 
serve as your faculty advisor. If you wish to know a bit more about thes< 
advisors you will find a more complete list of faculty in the first section o 
the Bulletin. 

3. Check your major. 

The list of majors is meant as a quick reference. Since Commercial an< 
Graphic Arts-Tech, is one of the majors in the Art Department, you knov 
you are in the right section of the Bulletin. 

4. Find your program. 

Note that Commercial and Graphic Arts-Tech, has an (A.S.) following th< 
title. This means it is an Associate in Science program, and if you do no 
remember what this means, go back and read the information under tha 
title in the preceding section. 

5. Examine the program and look up your courses. 

Note that under Course Prefixes at the beginning of the Art Departmen 
listing, you find ARC, ARH, ARV, and IND. Courses with these prefixes arc 
taught by the Art Department, and the description of these courses follow! 
after the Art Department programs. 
But since ENC 1103 and 1136, Freshman Communications, are not taugh 
by Art Department teachers, but by the Communications Department, yoi 
will find ENC courses described in the Communications Departmen 
section of the Bulletin. 

6. Learn your course numbering system. 

Palm Beach Junior College uses the Common Course Numbering systen 
now in use in all state community colleges and state universities in Florida 
It is the only course numbering system you will need to know if you attenc 
any of these institutions, and it facilitates transfer of credit from PBJC tc 
any other public college in Florida. Complying with a mandate from the 
legislature, the State Department of Education organized input from al 
segments of higher education in Florida to develop the numbers we are now 
using. 



108 



Art 




ACULTY: Hale (Chairperson), Arant, Archer, Houser, Slatery 
IAJORS: Advertising Design, Architecture, Art Education, Art 

History, Commercial and Graphic Art Technology, Fine 

Arts, Interior Design, Photography. 
OURSE PREFIXES: ARC, ARH, ART, ARV, IND 
ROGRAMS: 

DVERTISING DESIGN (A.A. 01-002) 

tie Advertising Program is designed to prepare students for a career in advertising 
id printing industries as a cameraman, layout artist and advertising designer. The 
'ogram articulates well with similar programs on the university level. 

SEMESTER 
OURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

RT 1600 Introduction to Photography 2 

RT1201 Design I 3 

RT1230 Advertising Design I 3 

RT 2231 Advertising Design II 3 

RT 2232 Advertising Design III 3 

RV 1202 Typography 3 

RV2214 Screen Printing 3 

RH 2050 History of Art I 3 

RH2051 History of Art II 3 

IMC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

NC1136 Freshman Communications II. . 3 

rD1110C Introduction to Technical Drawing 2 

ES1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

GF 1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

OS 1001** Introduction to Political Science — 3 

ES 1 100 Beginning Typewriting 3 

OC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 6 

Elective 3 



62 

HES 2121 may be substituted. 

POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

109 



Art 



ARCHITECTURE (A.A. 01-003) 

The Architecture Program is designed for the student who wishes to enter 
professional school of architecture at a university after two years at Palm Beach Junioi 
College. During the winter term of the freshman year, the architecture student shouk 
contact the university^ his choice for additional counseling. 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ARC 1 120 Architectural Drawing 3 

ARH2050 Art History I 3 

ARH2051 Art History II 3 

ART 1305 Freehand and Perspective Drawing 2 

BSC 1010 Principles of Biology 3 

BSC 1010L Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAC 1 144 Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 3 

MAC2411 Calculusl 3 

PHY 2023 General Physics I 3 

PHY 2048L General Physics I Laboratory 1 

PHY 2024 General Physics II 3 

PHY 2049L General Physics II Laboratory 1 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 2 

Art Electives 6 

General Education Electives 8 



62 



"HES 2121 may be substituted. 

*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



ART EDUCATION (A.A. 01-001) 

The Art Education Program is designed for the student who plans to major in Ari 
Education at a university and become certified to teach art at the elementary through 
high school level. 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ART 1201 Design I 3 

ART 1230 Advertising Design I. 3 

ART 1300 Drawing 1 3 

ART 1301 Drawing II 3 

ART 2302 Drawing III 3 

ARH2050 History of Art I 3 

ARH2051 History of Art II 3 

"HES2121 may be substituted. 
* * POS 2041 or AMH 201 may be substituted. 

110 



Art 

IRT EDUCATION (Cont'd) 

Jhoose a minimum of five of the following courses: 

kRT 1600 (Introduction to Photography (2) 

kRT 1203 (Three Dimensional Design (3) 

kRT 1202 (Color Design (3) 

kRT2400 (Introduction to Printmaking (3) 

kRT 2401 (Printmaking (3) 15 

^RT 2510 (Painting I (3) 

<RT 2520 (Painting II (3) 

\RJ 2701 (Sculpture (3) 

kRV 2214 (Screen Printing (3) 

■NC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

tfGF 1113 General Mathematics 1 3 

>OS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

50C 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 6 

*HES 2121 may be substituted. 64 
*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

VRT HISTORY (A.A. 01008) 

"he Art History Program is designed for the student who wishes to transfer to a 
iniversity as an Art History major with a view toward teaching and performing 
scholarly research. 

SEMESTER 
BOURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

VRT1201 Design 1 3 

kRT1300 Drawing I 3 

^RT 2510 Painting 1 3 

^RH 2050 History of Art I 3 

^RH2051 History of Art II 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

=RE 1 100 Elementary French 1 3 

r RE 1 101 Elementary French II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

.IT 2215 World Literature to 1600 3 

vIGF 1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

3 OS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

=tEL1210 The Old Testament 3 

^EL 1243 The New Testament 3 

3OC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

A/OH 1012 Ancient and Medieval Civilizations 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 6 

Electives 4 

62 

*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
**POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

111 



Art 

COMMERCIAL AND GRAPHIC ARTS TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 01-010) 

Palm Beach Junior College is cooperating with the North Technical Center, Riviera 
Beach, to offer an A.S. degree in Graphic Arts Technology. The technical portion of the 
program will be offered at the North Technical Center, while the academic portion will 
be offered at Palm Beach Junior College. 

PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ART 1600 Introduction to Photography 2 

ART 1201 Design 1 3 

ART 1230 Advertising Design 1 3 

ARV2214 Screen Printing 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

or 

ENC 1313 Technical Writing (3) 

ETD1110C Introduction to Technical Drawing 2 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 7 . 2 

Electives 12 

Courses for which credit will be granted upon certification from North Technical 
Center: 

ARV1200 Graphic Arts Technology 1 3 

ARV 1202 Typography 3 

ARV 1221 Production Graphics 3 

ARV 1234 Graphic Arts Technology II 3 

ARV 1264 Graphic Arts Industries. 3 

ARV2214 Screen Printing 3 

ARV 2222C Graphic Arts Technology III 3 

62 

*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
* * POS 2041 or AM H 201 may be substituted. 
Five hundred forty (540) hours of instruction will be the average time required to fulfill 
the requirements at North Technical Center (3 hours per day for one school year). 

FINE ARTS (A.A. 01-006) 

The Fine Arts Program is designed to prepare students for advance work at a university 
or art institute as painters, sculptors or printmakers. 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ART 1201 Design I 3 

ART 1300 Drawing 1 3 

ART 1301 Drawing II 3 

ART 2302 Drawing III 3 

ARH 2050 History of Art I 3 

ARH2051 History of Art II 3 

112 



Art 



Choose a Minimum of six of the following courses: 

ART 1600 (Introduction to Photography (2) 

ART 1202 (Color Design (3) 

ART 1203 (Three Dimensional Design (3) 

ART 2400 (Introduction to Printmaking (3) 

ART 2401 (Printmaking (3) 18 

ART 2510 (Painting I (3) 

ART 2520 (Painting II (3) 

ART 2701 (Sculpture (3) 

ARV 2214 (Screen Printing (3) 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MGF 1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 6 



64 

INTERIOR DESIGN (A.A. 01-005) 

The Interior Design Program is designed to prepare the student for advanced work at a 
university in Interior Design. 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ARC 1120 Architectural Drawing 3 

ART 1100 Arts and Crafts I 3 

ART 1101 Arts and Crafts 1 1 3 

ART 1201 Design 1 3 

ART 1202 Color Design 3 

ART 1305 Freehand Perspective Drawing 2 

ARH 2050 History of Art I 3 

ARH2051 History of Art II 3 

ETD1110C Introduction to Technical Drawing 2 

IND 1012 Basic Interior Design 3 

IND2010 Practical Applications in Interior Design 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MGF1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 6 

Electives 3 



62 



*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
* * POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



113 



Art 

INTERIOR DESIGN — TECH (A.S. 01012) 

This two-year Interior Design Technical Program prepares the student with necessary 
skills to gain employment in the Interior Design field. 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ART 1100 Arts and Crafts I 3 

ART 1101 Arts and Crafts II 3 

ART 1600 Introduction to Photography 2 

ART 1110 Ceramics 1 2 

ART 1201 Design I 3 

ART 1202 Color Design 3 

ART 1203 Three Dimensional Design 3 

ART 1305 Freehand Perspective Drawing 2 

ART 2130 Fabric Design and Weaving 3 

ARC 1 120 Architectural Drawing 3 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

ETD1110C Introduction to Technical Drawing 2 

IND 1012 Basic Interior Design 3 

IND1013 History of Period Furniture 3 

IND 2010 Practical Applications of Interior Design 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

or 

ENC 1313 Technical Writing (3) 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAR 2101 Salesmanship 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 2 

Elective 2 

62 

*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
* * POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

PHOTOGRAPHY (A.A. 01-004) 

This program is designed to prepare a student for advanced work in photography at 
university. Students who do not plan to transfer to a university and wish to ean an A.S. 
degree may substitute other courses for the math, literature and science 
requirements. 

Student in all photography courses will be required to furnish film, film developer, 
photographic paper, and a camera which permits the manual control of the lens 
aperture and shutter speed. (No automatic cameras) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ART 1201 Design I 3 

ART 1300 Drawing 1 3 

ART 1600 Introduction to Photography 2 

114 



Art 



ART 2601 Photography 1 3 

ART 2604 Photography II 3 

ARH 2050 History of Art I 3 

ARH2051 History of Art II 3 

ARV 2105 Dye Transfer Photography 3 

ARV2214 Screen Printing 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

MGF 1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 6 

Art Electives 3 

General Education Electives 6 



*HES2121 may be substituted. 
' *POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



63 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Students are usually required to submit portfolios of their work when seeking ad- 
mission to a university or employment in a studio or agency. It is the responsibility of 
all students to compile a portfolio which will contain examples of their best work in 
each art course. Determination of best work should be made in consultation with the 
instructor. 

Architecture 

ARC 1120 ARCHITECTURAL DRAWING 

(Prerequisite: ART 1305) A beginning course in instrumental drawing with em- 
phasis on development of techniques necessary to present clear and precise 
solutions to basic architectural problems. Orthographic projection, perspective 
and architectural shades and shadows are covered. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter 
terms) 

Art History 

ARH 1000 ART APPRECIATION 

This course presents a broad view into important works of the visual arts from 
the past and present. The course is designed to provide the student with an 
intelligent insight into works of art and meet the needs of the General Education 
program in the Humanities. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ARH 1955 HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF ART I (FOREIGN STUDY) 

A survey of the galleries and historic sites of foreign countries. It will consist of 
a planned tour with a series of lectures before departure. Three hours credit, 
(offered Spring term) 



'Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

115 



Art 



ARH 1956 HISTORY AND APPRECIATION OF ART II (FOREIGN STUDY) 

Same as ARH 1955 with the exception that students will be required to keep a 
photographic record of the work studied and a comprehensive notebook as 
prescribed by a course syllabus. Three hours credit, (offered Spring term) 

ARH 2050 HISTORY OF ART I 

Critical analysis of major works of art from prehistoric world to the Gothic 
cathedral. Encompassing painting, sculpture and architecture, the course will 
emphasize the meaningful correlation of the art work with the civilization that 
produced it. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

ARH 2051 HISTORY OF ART II 

Critical analysis of major works of art from the Renaissance through Modernity. 
Encompassing painting, sculpture and architectural works. The course will 
emphasize the meaningful correlation of the art work with the civilization that 
produced it. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

Art 

ART 1100 ARTS AND CRAFTS I 

A survey of arts and crafts pertaining to creative and aesthetic aspects of 
various crafts. Includes ceramics, fibers, metals and other materials. Also 
recommended for students entering programs/careers in recreational leader- 
ship, mental health, occupational therapy and education. 2-2-3* (offered Fall & 
Winter terms) 

ART 1101 ARTS AND CRAFTS II 

The purpose of this course is to give students in-depth training in a limited 
number of materials and techniques for crafts, according to the students' in- 
dividual needs. 2-2-3* (offered Winter term) 

ART 1110 CERAMICS I 

This course introduces the basic methods of ceramic production in hand 
building and wheel throwing. Techniques of glazing will be introduced. 1-3-2* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ART 1111 CERAMICS II 

(Prerequisite: ART 1110) A continuation of the ceramics unit introduced in ART 
1110. Kiln stacking and firing are required and glaze formulation is continued on 
an individual basis. 1-3-2* (offered Winter term) 

ART 1155 ENAMELING AND JEWELRY 

Practical methods of handmade jewelry, historical and contemporary ap- 
proaches to design and technical skills are pursued. Basic techniques include 
soldering, annealing, pickling, filing, drilling, bezeling, polishing and buffing, 
inlay, enameling and casting. 1-3-2* (offered Winter term) 

ART 1201 DESIGN I 

The visual principles and elements are explored, primarily in two dimensional 
relationships. This is a basic course in design where the student develops a 
familiarity with the elements and principles of design and a technical skill in 
handling the tools of art. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
116 



Art 



ART 1202 COLOR DESIGN 

(Prerequisite: ART 1201) Further exploration of the visual principles and 
elements with emphasis on color theory and on the use of color in design. Light 
will be considered. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ART 1203 THREE DIMENSIONAL DESIGN 

(Prerequisite: ART 1201 and ART 1300) An introduction of the visual elements 
and principles of design in three dimensions. A wide variety of materials and 
approaches will be explored. Emphasis is on observing reality. 1-4-3* (offered 
Winter term) 

CxRT 1230 ADVERTISING DESIGN I 

(Prerequisite: ART 1201) Lettering and layout form the basis for study of visual 
relationships. Knowledge of tools and procedures is stressed. This course 
fulfills the requirement for teachers accreditation in lettering. 1-4-3* (offered Fall 
term) 

ART 1300 DRAWING I 

A basic course in drawing with emphasis on composition and two-dimensional 
illusion of space and form. Still life is the primary subject matter and students 
work in various media. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ART 1301 DRAWING II 

(Prerequisite: ART 1300) A continuation of ART 1300, using the figure as subject 
matter. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ART 1305 FREEHAND PERSPECTIVE DRAWING 

This course emphasizes the development of skills necessary for effective 
freehand, visual communication in the fields of architecture, interior design, 
drafting, and related engineering areas. Perspective, scale, proportion, shades 
and shadows, interior and exterior rendering, and geometric forms related to 
mechanical design concepts will be covered. 1-3-2* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ART 2130 FABRIC DESIGN AND WEAVING 

A creative approach to fabrics and fibers with the major emphasis on weaving 
techniques. Students will incorporate their own designs into the various fiber 
forms using both hand and floor looms. 1-4-3* (offered Fall term) 

ART 2231 ADVERTISING DESIGN II 

(Prerequisite: ART 1230) Commercial art material for reproduction is a major 
concern. Production procedures are carried out from roughs to finished art. 
Field trips will be taken to different working areas of the advertising art industry 
where the techniques and procedures of graphic reproduction will be studied. 1- 
4-3* (offered Fall term) 

ART 2232 ADVERTISING DESIGN III 

(Prerequisite: ART 2231) Visualization and presentation of layout and design is 
carried out in presentation art. Emphasis will be on design of a company's ad- 
vertising program. Speed and proficiency are goals and the student's production 
becomes the basis for his portfolio. 1-4-3* (offered Winter term) 

ART 2302 DRAWING III 

(Prerequisite: ART 1301) An intermediate drawing course with emphasis on the 
student's creative expression and development of personal concepts. 1-4-3* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 



Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

117 



Art 



ART 2400 INTRODUCTION TO PRINTMAKING 

(Prerequisite: ART 1201; co-requisite ART 1301) An introduction to various 
printmaking processes, such as seriography, etching, woodcuts and 
lithography. Simple examples in various approaches and the use of presses are 
explored. 1-4-3* (offered Winter term) 

ART 2401 PRINTMAKING 

(Prerequisite: ART 2310) A print course with emphasis on image making as it 
relates to a desired printing process. 1-4-3* (offered Fall term) 

ART 2510 PAINTING COMPOSITION I 

(Prerequisite: ART 1201 and ART 1300) This course explores the fundamental 
techniques of painting in water color, acrylic and/or oil. A sensitive un- 
derstanding of expression through composition is sought. Sound technical 
procedures are emphasized. 2-2-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ART 2520 PAINTING COMPOSITION II 

(Prerequisite: ART 2510) This is a continuation of ART 2510. The major concern 
is the exploration of composition as a solution of individual problems of ex- 
pression through the study of styles in the past and present. Oil and/or acrylic 
and water color are the major media. 2-2-3* (offered Winter term) 

ART 2701 SCULPTURE 

(Prerequisite: ART 1203) The exploration of three dimensional aesthetic ex- 
pression. Technical skills are developed in reference to sculpture media. Ad- 
ditive and subtractive procedures, mold-making and casting are explored. 1-4-3* 
(offered Fall term) 

ART 1949 CO-OP: ASSIGNMENT IN ART I 

Co-Op Education in Art is a coordinated work-study program which reinforces 
the educational and professional growth of the student through parallel in- 
volvement in classroom studies and field experience in the student's chosen 
career. The student and teacher-coordinatordetermine the objectives for the on- 
the-job art assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher-coordinator 
and the immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3* 

ART 2949 COOP: ASSIGNMENT IN ART II 

This course is a continuation of ART 1949, 1-10-3* 

Arts, Vocational 

Students in all photography courses will be required to furnish film, film developer, 
photograph paper and a camera which permits the manual control of the lens aperture 
and shutter speed. (NO AUTOMATIC CAMERAS WITHOUT MANUAL OVERRIDE 
SYSTEM) 

ART 1600 INTRODUCTION TO PHOTOGRAPHY 

An introduction to black and white photography. The camera's construction and 
operation is explained. Emphasis is on printing and darkroom procedures. 1-3-2* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ART 2601 PHOTOGRAPHY I 

(Prerequisite: ART 1201 and ART 1600) A course designed for the art or 
photography major. This course explores the visual elements and principles of 
design in a photographic way. Emphasis is placed on image and content. 
Concepts, various light sensitive materials, and technical aspects are explored. 
1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
118 



Art 



k RT2604 PHOTOGRAPHY II 

(Prerequisite: ART 2601) A continuation of ART 2601, this course will emphasize 
portrait, product, and experimental photography while continuing the 
photography major's personal approach to his work. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter 
terms) 

IRV1200 GRAPHIC ARTS TECHNOLOGY I 

An introduction to the printing processes: letterpress, offset, gravure, screen 
printing, xerography, and duplicating techniques. Students will study the 
historical aspects of the development of printing and learn the limitations of the 
processes and types of work most appropriate for each reproduction process. 
Laboratory exercises include the camerwork on the graphic arts process 
camera, basic stripping and contact printing techniques. 2-2-3* (offered Winter 
term) 

&RV1202 TYPOGRAPHY 

This course covers the historical development of printing types, mechanization 
of typesetting, phototypesetting, computerized typesetting, and photo lettering 
devices. Copyfitting, type classification and recognition are included. 1-4-3* 
(offered Winter term) 

tRV1221 PRODUCTION GRAPHICS 

(Prerequisite: permission of instructor) This is a graphic arts course in which 
students gain professional knowledge and skills through the actual production 
of a printed publication or other printed matter. Students will be involved with 
the full spectrum of publication production graphics. Editorial management, 
design and layout, copy writing, photography, and technical graphic arts will be 
included, with concentration on the student's area of specialty. 1-4-3* (offered 
Fall & Winter terms) 

kRV1234 GRAPHIC ARTS TECHNOLOGY II 

(Prerequisite: ARV 1200 or permission of instructor) This course covers process 
camera procedures used with continuous tone copy and the resultant halftone 
negative. Laboratory exercises include the preparation of negatives and 
positives for plate making. 1-4-3* (offered Fall term) 

iRV1264 GRAPHIC ARTS INDUSTRIES 

An introductory course designed for the student who is considering a career in 
the graphic arts industry. Students will go on field trips to printing, publishing, 
and other graphic arts firms and will receive an orientation to graphic arts 
materials and processes by use of laboratory demonstrations. There will be a 
study of developments in technology, management, and scientific applications 
and their effects on the industry. 1-4-3* (offered Fall term) 

iRV2105 DYE-TRANSFER PHOTOGRAPHY 

(Prerequisite: ARV 1100) An introductory course in the making of photographic 
color prints by transferring dyes from matrices to mordant coated paper. 
Students learn darkroom techniques of color filtering, density control and color 
balance. There will be a study of dye transfer as it relates to commercial 
photography and photography as a fine art. 1-4-3* (offered Winter term) 



'Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

119 



Art 



ARV 2214 SCREEN PRINTING 

An introductory course in the study of the theory and practice of screen printing 
Students will gain skills in stencil cutting, frame construction, and photographic 
techniques in screen printing. There will be a study of some of the economic anc 
commercial aspects of screen printing and also its place in the fine arts. 1-4-3* 
(offered Winter term) 

ARV 2217 INK AND COLOR 

An introductory course in the mixing and color matching of printing inks 
Students will gain skills in manipulating inks to suit paper and press and learr 
basic requirements of ink for other particular applications. There will be a stud} 
of paper manufacturing, the selection of papers according to usage, and cos 
estimating. 1-4-3* (offered Winter term) 

ARV 2222 GRAPHIC ARTS TECHNOLOGY III 

(Prerequisite: ARV 1200 and ARV 1234 or permission of instructor) This course 
gives advanced training according to the individual educational needs anc 
capabilities of each student. Personal growth and skill development in ad 
vertising design, typography, copy preparation, process camera work anc 
stripping. 1-4-3* (offered Winter term) 

Interior Design 

IND1012 BASIC INTERIOR DESIGN 

A comprehensive survey course where the elements of art are studied as the) 
apply to interiors. Client-designer relationships, interiors relating to the ar 
chitecture and the surrounding community, knowledge of the fibers and fabric 
construction, study of period furniture and ecletic combinations are all part o 
the course. The student will render two and three dimensional projects. 1-4-3 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

IND1013 HISTORY OF PERIOD FURNITURE 

A course designed to provide knowledge of the development of furniture 
throughout history. It will enhance the ability to recognize and use eclectic 
combinations in the homes of today. This will include the study of fabrics, ac 
cessories and architectural details. Each student will assemble a com 
prehensive notebook combining renderings and photographs. 3-0-3* (offeree 
Winter term) 

IND 2010 PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS IN INTERIOR DESIGN 

The purpose of this course is to develop in the student the ability to plan in 
teriors functionally, from a blueprint to the final assembly of all furnishings 
Included will be a study of the relationships between measuring and handling, 
materials, and purchasing and cost estimation. This course gives advancec 
training to students in the field or planning an immediate entry into the 
profession. 1-4-3* (offered Fall term) 

IND 2011 BUSINESS PROCEDURES FOR INTERIOR DESIGNERS 

This covers business processes such as contracts, pricing, profits and invoicing 
as they relate to the interior design profession. The course will include a stud) 
of ethical practices in designer-client relationships, and students will visit in 
terior design studios in the area. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
120 



Business 




Business 

Suttle (Chairperson), Batson, Boorman, Davis, Franklin, 
W. Graham, Ledbetter, McAliley, Peterson, Prentice, 
Rive, L Smith, S. Smith, Steckler, Widdows. PBJC North, 
Holloway. PBJC Glades, Painter. PBJC South, N. Smith, 
Weatherly 

Accounting, Banking, Business Administration (Univ. 
Parallel), Business Teacher, Clerical Practice, Clothing 
and Textiles, Computer Science, Computer Technology, 
Dietetics, Economics, Executive Secretary, Fashion, 
Food Service Management, General Business (Tech), 
General Home Economics, Home Economics Teacher, 
Hotel-Food Service, Hotel-Motel Management, In- 
surance, International Trade, Legal Assistant, Legal 
Secretary, Management, Medical Secretary, Public 
Administration, Purchasing Management, Real Estate, 
Retailing (Management and Merchandising), Sales and 
Marketing. 



BOURSE PREFIXES: ACC, BAN, BUL, COA, COE, CTE, DIE, ECO, 
FIN, FSS, HFT, HUN, MAN, MAR, MKA, MTB, PAD, REE, RMI, 
SES. 

ROGRAMS: All students planning to complete a four-year Bac- 
calaureate Degree in some business specialty should follow the 
Business Administration (A.A. 03-052) curriculum. Electives in 
this curriculum may be selected in the student's specialty as 
approved by the student's academic advisor. 

121 



Business 

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION (A.A. 03-052) 

This curriculum is to be followed by the student who plans to work for the bac 
calaureate degree in Accounting, Business Administration, Economics, Management 
Real Estate, Insurance, International Trade, Retailing, Hotel-Food Service, and Sale; 
and Marketing. 

GENERAL EDUCATION AND GRADUATION REQUIREMENTS 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT| 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

MAC 1 104 College Algebra 3 

Science 6 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS 1001 * Introduction to Political Science 3 

MAN 1700 Introduction to Business 3 

ACC1001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 

ACC 1021 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ECO 2013 Principles of Economics I 3 

ECO 2023* * Principles of Economics II 3 

COC 1110 Intro, to Computers 3 

Literature 3 

STA2014 Statistics 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Physical Education 2 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

HES1000*** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

General Education Electives 7 

ELECTIVES 62 

Business Electives should be selected only after you have examined the catalog of th 
upper division college you plan to attend and have had these approved by yoi 
academic advisor. 

*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
* *ECO 2013-ECO 2023 considered Social Science for General Education purposes. 
***HES2121 may be substituted. 
BANKING (A.S. 03-075) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDI1 

ACC 1001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 

ACC 1021 Principles of Accounting II 3 

BAN 1303 Savings and Time Deposits 3 

BAN 1240 Installment Credit 3 

BUL 1658 Law and Banking 3 

FIN 1230 Money and Banking 3 

BAN 1 1 10 Principles of Bank Operations 3 

ECO 2000 Introduction to Economics 3 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 2 

32 
122 



Business 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

AN 2200 Credit Administration 3 

AN 2230 Bank Investments 3 

IAN 2342 Supervision & Personnel Administration 3 

IES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

OS 2041 American National Government 3 

PC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

**Electives 13 

30 
•HES2121 may be substituted. 

'Approved electives: MAN 1701, BAN 2720, BAN 2150, BAN 2400, BAN 2120, SPC 
601, PSY2012, ENC 1136. 

s requirements are met as specified in the AIB catalog, certificates may be awarded 
members of the American Institute of Banking. A "C" average is required for any 
istitute Certificate and graduation. 

USINESS EDUCATION TEACHER (A.A. 03-056) 

his curriculum is the planned sequence for the sophomore and freshman years for 
lose students going on to the university to complete the requirements for the bac- 
alaureate degree in business education. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
OURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

CC 1001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 

CC1021 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ES1210 Beginning Shorthand 3 

ES 121 1 Dictation & Transcription 3 

ES 1 100 Beginning Typewriting 3 

ES 1 1 10* Intermediate Typewriting 3 

NC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

NC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

ES 1000** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Physical Education 2 

ES 1330 Business English 3 

31 
*Students who qualify to go into SES 1211 and SES 1110 may substitute electives 
pproved by the Business Advisor. 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

RH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

IUL1011 Music Appreciation (3) 

UL2111 Business Law 3 

ES 2335 Business Communications 3 

Literature 3 

IGF 1113 General Education Math I 3 

Science 6 

OS 1001*** Introduction to Political Science 3 

OC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Electives 6 

33 
* *POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

123 



Business 

CLERICAL PRACTICE (A.S. 03066) 

The purpose of this curriculum is to prepare the student for employment as clerk 
typist. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ENC1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

MAN 1700 Introduction to Business 3 

MTB 1 103 Business Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 2 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

SES 1 100* Beginning Typewriting. 3 

SES 1110 Intermediate Typewriting 3 

SES 1330 Business English 3 

SOC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Electives 6 

32 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ACC 1880 Bookkeeping 3 

HES1000*** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

SES 1401 Clerical Office Practice 3 

SES 2120 Advanced Typewriting 3 

SES 2361 Machine Transcription 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Electives 13 

30 

*lf the student has had typewriting in high school or can pass the qualifying tes 
satisfactorily, he may be exempt from SES 1100. 
* * POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
***HES 2121 may be substituted. 

EXECUTIVE SECRETARY (EXECUTIVE, LEGAL, OR MEDICAL (A.S. 03-058) 

The student is trained to do top-level secretarial work. Speed goals are set for 12 
words a minute in dictation, 65 words a minute in typewriting, and 40 words a minute 
transcribing. The complete program has as its goal an informed, knowledgeable ar 
skilled secretary. 

FRESHMAN YEAR - First Semester 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDI 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

HES 1000* * * Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Physical Education 1 

SES 1 100 Beginning Typewriting 3 

or 

SES 1110** Intermediate Typewriting (3) 

SES 1210* Beginning Shorthand 3 

or 

SES 1211 Dictation and Transcription (3) 

SOC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

15 
124 



Business 



XECUTIVE SECRETARY (Cont'd) 



FRESHMAN YEAR • Second Semester 

/ITB 1 103 Business Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 1 

>ES 1 1 10 Intermediate Typewriting 3 

or 

ES 2120 Advanced Typewriting (3) 

ES1211 Dictation and Transcription 3 

or 
ES 2248 Special Legal/Medical Dictation and Transcrip. . . (3) 

ES 1330 Business English 3 

ES 1401 Clerical Office Practice 3 

16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR - First Semester 

CC 1880 Bookkeeping 3 

PC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

ES 1949 CO-OP: Office Education 1 3 

ES 2335 Business Communications 3 

ES 2361 Machine Transcription 3 

15 
SOPHOMORE YEAR - Second Semester 

UL 21 1 1 Business Law I , 3 

DS1001 Introduction to Political Science 3 

ES 1402 Secretarial Office Procedures 3 

ES 2949 CO-OP: Office Education II 3 

Electives 4 

16 
* Students enrolled in SES 1210 must be able to type at least 35 WPM or be 
enrolled in Intermediate Typing. 
** Students who qualify for SES 1211 or SES 1110 may substitute an elective 
approved by Business Advisor. 
*** HES 2121 may be substituted. 
**** Legal and medical secretaries substitute SES 2248 for SES 1211. Students 
must have two semesters of shorthand, unless they can take dictation at 60 
WPM; then they should take only Intermediate Shorthand or Special 
Legal/Medical. If they are unable to take dictation at 60 WPM, they should 
take both Beginning and Intermediate or Special. 
***** POS2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



125 



Business 

FASHION (A.S. 03-073) 

This curriculum is for students who will, after two years, enter careers in fashior 
design, custom dressmaking, fabrics and fashion promotion, or clothing managemenl 
specialist. FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDI1 
COURSE TITLE Fall Wintei 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 , 

CTE 1310 Elements of Clothing Construction 3 

CTE 1743 Creative Pattern Making I 3 

CTE 1744 Creative Pattern Making II 3 

CTE 2200 Costume Selection 3 

CTE 2430 Advanced Clothing Construction 3 

CTE 2514 Fashion History 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

Physical Education 1 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

15 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ART 1201 Design 1 3 

CTE 1705 Fashion Theory 3 

CTE 1731 Trade Sketching 3 

CTE 1949 CO-OP: Home Economics I 3 

CTE 2745 Fashion Design — Draping 3 

CTE 2949 CO-OP: Home Economics II 3 

HES1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MKA1411 Textiles 3 

Physical Education 1 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

Elective* * * 4 

*HES 2121 may be substituted. 16 15 

**POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
***ART 1202, ART 1300, ART 1301, ACC 1001, MAN 2770, MKA 1402. 

FASHION DESIGN AND FASHION MERCHANDISING (A.A. 03-507) 

This suggested curriculum provides university parallel courses to meet the needs o 
students who are interested in university preparation for professional positions ir 
clothing textiles, fashion merchandising, fashion design, and fashion promotion. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ART 1201 Design 1 3 

CTE 1310 Elements of Clothing Construction 3 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

MGF1113 General Education Mathematics! 3 

MKA 1411 Textiles 3 

Physical Education 2 

POS 1001 * Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Science '. 7 

126 ~**~ 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ACC 1001 Principles of Accounting I 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 

CTE 1949 CO-OP: Home Economics I 

CTE 2200 Costume Selection 

CTE 2340 Advanced Clothing Construction 

CTE 2949 CO-OP: Home Economics II 

ECO 2013 Principles of Economics I 

HES 1000* * Perspectives on Healthful Living 

Literature 

Elective*** 



Business 



29 



*POS2041 orAMH 2010 may be substituted. 

*HES2121 may be substituted. 

*PSY 2012, SPC 1600, ART 1202, ACC 1021, ECO 2013 are recommended electives. 

FASHION MERCHANDISING (A.S. 03-055) 

This curriculum is designed to stress the basics of merchandising, the role of a buyer 
and buying principles. Emphasis is on coordination and fashion, buying habits, the 
Tiotivation of consumers in terms of implications for retail buying. 
FRESHMAN YEAR • First Semester 

SEMESTER 
BOURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

V1AR1151*** Retail Management 3 

MAR 2101 Salesmanship 3 

MKA 1402 Fashion Merchandising 3 

MKA 1949A CO-OP: Merchandising I 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 
FRESHMAN YEAR - Second Semester 

MAR 131 1 Advertising 3 

MAR 2011 Marketing 3 

MKA 1161 Product Merchandising 3 

MKA 1411 Textiles 3 

MKA 1949B CO-OP: Merchandising II 3 

Physical Education 1 

16 
'Title was formerly Introduction to Retailing. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR - First Semester 

MAN 2100 Human Relations 3 

MAN 2800 Small Business Management 3 

MKA 2949A CO-OP: Merchandising III 3 

MTB 1 103 Business Mathematics 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

15 



127 



Business 



ACC 1880 
HES 1000* 
MKA2949B 
POS 1001** 



SOPHOMORE YEAR - Second Semester 

Bookkeeping 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 

CO-OP: Merchandising IV 

Introduction to Political Science 

Business Elective 



15 



'HES 2121 may be substituted. 

'POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT (A.S. 03-068) 

This curriculum is a midmanagement program. It provides both a theoretical and a 
practical approach in food service management. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 



COURSE 

ENC1103 
FSS 2221 
HFT 1000 
HUN 1201 
SOC1200 

ACC 1880 
ENC1136 
FSS 2222 
HFT 2220 
POS 1001* 



FSS 2251 
FSS 2284 
HES 1000* 
HFT 1949 
MAR 2011 
FSS 2100 
FSS 2242 
FSS 2500 
HFT 2949 
MAN 2000 



TITLE Fall 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Introduction to Commercial Food Production 4 

Introduction to the Hospitality Business 3 

Elements of Nutrition 3 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 1 

Bookkeeping 

Freshman Communications II 

Intermediate Food Preparation 

Personnel Mgmt. Prac. in Hospitality Busmess 

Introduction to Political Science 

Physical Education 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Op. Proc. Quantity Food Services 3 

Advanced Food Preparation 6 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Co-op Hotel-Food Service Management I 4 

Principles of Marketing 3 

Purchasing Management 

International Cuisine 

Food and Beverage Control 

Co-op Hotel-Food Service Management II 

Principles of Management 



*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
*HES2121 may be substituted. 



Winter 



34 



36 



128 



Business 

NERAL BUSINESS (A.S. 03-057) 

is is a two-year program for the student who wants two years of preparation for 
iness with a minimum of general education, and the opportunity to explore the 
Ids of vocational interest. 

SEMESTER 
UlRSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

C 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

C1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

or 

C 1313 Technical Writing (3) 

S 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Physical Education 2 

C1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

S 1001 * * Introduction to Political Science 3 

Business Electives 46 

62 

)TE: Electives may be selected from the broad field of Business and Data 

>cessing offerings to meet the needs and interests of the student with the approval 

the Business Advisor. 

HES 2121 may be substituted. 

'OS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

NERAL HOME ECONOMICS (A.S. 03-072) 

ese courses are recommended for those students seeking an Associate in Science 
gree and terminating their college work upon graduating with this degree at PBJC. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 

HJRSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

E1310 Elements of Clothing Construction 3 

E 1743 Creative Pattern Making I 3 

E 1949 CO-OP: Home Economics I 3 

E2340 Clothing Construction 3 

IC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

IC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

S1210 Food for the Family 3 

JN1201 Elements of Nutrition 3 

)S 1001 * Introduction to Political Science 3 

)C1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences. 3 



30 



OS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



129 



Business 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

COA 1 100 Consumer Education 3 

CTE 1744 Creative Pattern Making II 3 

CTE 2200 Costume Selection 3 

CTE 2949 CO-OP: Home Economics II 3 

HES 1000** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MKA1411 Textiles 3 

Physical Education 2 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Electives* * * 7 

**HES 2121 may be substituted. 
***Recommended electives depending on individual student's goals:MAN 2100, MA 
1700, IND 2010, IND 2011, ACC 1001, SES 1100, EGC 2120, MAN 2800, MAF 2001, FJ 
1112, MAR 2011, MAR 1311. 

HOME ECONOMICS (A.A. 03-501) 
This suggested curriculum provides university parallel courses to meet the needs 
students who are interested in university preparation for professional positions 
child development, dietetics, home and family life, teaching, foods and nutritio 
clothing textiles, and in other related areas. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDI 

CTE 1312 Elements of Clothing Construction 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

FSS1210 Food for the Family 3 

HUN 1210 Elements of Nutrition 3 

MGF 1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

Physical Education 2 

POS1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

Science 7 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 33 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

COA 1 100 Consumer Education 3 

CTE 2200 Costume Selection 3 

CTE 2340 Advanced Clothing Construction 3 

CTE 2949 CO-OP: Home Economics II 3 

ECO 2013 Principles of Economics I 3 

HES 1000* * Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Literature 3 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

Elective* * * 3 

29 
*POS2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
**HES2121 may be substituted. 
***ART 1201, MAF 2001, MAN 1700, MKA 1411, PHI 1000, SPC 1600 may be elect* 
according to student's interests. 
Most universities require consumer education and economics for home econom 
majors in the core curriculum for professional areas listed above. 

130 



OSPITALITY MANAGEMENT (A.S. 03060) 

his curriculum is a midmanagement program. The curriculum provides both a 
leoretical and a practical approach. Laboratory experience and training in hotels, 
lotels, restaurants, and clubs is provided through part-time employment in local 
stablishments. This curriculum prepares the student for employment in the food- 
idging industry. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
OURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

NC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

NC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

SS 2221 Quantity Food Composition and Preparation 3 

ES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

FT 1000 Introduction to the Hospitality Business 3 

FT 1949 CO-OP: Hotel-Food Service Management I 4 

FT 2410 Hotel Front Office Procedures and Management. . . 3 

UN 1201 Elements of Nutrition 3 

Physical Education 2 

OS 1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

29 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

CC 1880 Bookkeeping 3 

SS 2100 Purchasing Management 3 

SS 2251 Operational Procedures of Quantity Food Service . . 3 

SS 2500 Food and Beverage Control 2 

FT 2220 Personnel Mgmt. Practices in the Hospitality Bus. . 3 

FT 2949 CO-OP: Hotel-Food Service Management II 4 

IAN 2000 Principles of Management 3 

IAN 2100 Human Relations in Business 3 

Business Administration Electives 9 

33 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
*AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

131 



Business 

INSURANCE (A.S. 03-504) 
Chartered Life Underwriter Option 

The CLU option is designed to give the student an insight into the general fields 
knowledge related to the insuring of human life and a thorough knowledge of heal 
insurance, life insurance, and related subject areas. A student who completes tl 
program should have the capacity for applying this knowledge to actual family ai 
business situations. Successful completion of a course will entitle the student 
apply to the American College for that CLU examination. Students interested in CI 
should take the following courses*: 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDI 

ACC 2009 Accounting and Finance 3 

ACC2509 Income Taxation 3 

ECO 2005 Economics 3 

FIN 2110 Investments and Family Financial Management .. . 3 

RMI2110 Economic Security and Individual Life Insurance. . . 3 

RMI2130 Group Insurance and Social Insurance 3 

RMI 2150 Pension Planning 3 

RMI 2320 Business Insurance 3 

RMI 2430 Life Insurance Law and Mathematics 3 

RMI 2800 Estate Planning and Taxation 3 

30 
Chartered Property Casualty Underwriter Option 

The CPCU option focuses on risk management techniques, analysis of all types 
insurance contracts, coverage provided by many property-liability contract 
management of loss exposures through applications of loss control and loss financir 
techniques, organizational structure in the insurance industry, economic, lege 
financial, and social ramifications of insurance, and the nature of professionalism as 
framework for business practice. Successful completion of a course will entitle tr 
student to apply to the Insurance Institute of America for that CPCU examinatio 
Students interested in property and casualty insurance should take the followin 
courses*: 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDI 

RM1 1010 Principles of Risk Management and Insurance 3 

RM1 1782 Personal Risk Management and Insurance 3 

RM1 1783 Commercial Property Risk Management and In- 
surance . , 3 

RM1 1784 Commercial Liability Risk Management and In- 
surance 3 

RMI 2050 Economics 3 

RMI 2750 Accounting and Finance 3 

RMI 2780 Insurance Issues and Professional Ethics. 3 

RMI 2785 Insurance Company Operations 3 

RMI 2786 The Legal Environment of Insurance 3 

RMI 2787 Management — Insurance Personnel 3 

30 
*See Core Classes which follow. 



132 



Business 



JURANCE (Cont'd) 



re courses are to be completed by the student enrolled in either CLU or CPCU: 



BURSE 

C1103 
C1136* 

or 
C1313 
S1000 
VC1104 

or 
B1103 

>S 2041 * 

>C1200 

C1600 



SEMESTER 
TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 3 

Technical Writing (3) 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

College Algebra 3 

Business Mathematics (3) 

Physical Education 2 

American National Government 3 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Electives*** 10 



32 

If student plans to attend university, select ENC 1136. 
*POS 1001 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
If student plans to complete PBJC's general education requirements, elect 6 hours 

humanities, 6 hours of science, and 6 hours of approved courses for general 
ucation. 



)TE: Individuals who have credit for passing one or more CLU examinations meeting 
the requirements of the American College will receive credit for each 
examination passed. Credit would be granted to the student for courses listed 
above. 

Individuals who have credit for passing one or more CPCU examinations 
meeting the requirements of the Insurance Institute of America will receive 
credit for each examination passed. Credit would be granted to the student for 
courses listed above. 




133 



Business 

INTERNATIONAL BUSINESS (A.A. 03-508) 

This program equips a student to transfer to a university to pursue a bachelor's degr( 
in International Business. It prepares students for grapsing opportunities in glob 
trade, which is growing twice as fast as domestic enterprise, and in careers in Unite 
States based multinational firms. 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDI 

ACC 1001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 

ACC 1021 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

ASN 2000 Asian Studies 3 

BUL2111 Business Law I 3 

BUL2112 Business Law II 3 

COC1110 Introduction to Computers 3 

ECO 2013 Principles of Economics I 3 

ECO.2023 Principles of Economics II 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAC 1104 College Algebra 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

CPO 2040 Comparative Governments 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

STA2014 Statistics 3 

Literature 3 

Natural Science 6 

Physical Education 2 

64 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
**AMH 2010 or POS 2041 may be substituted. 

LEGAL ASSISTANT (A.S. 03-505) 

FRESHMAN YEAR - Fall Term 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDI 

BUL 21 1 1 Business Law I 3 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

LEA 1011 Legal Writing and Research 3 

SES 1110 Intermediate Typewriting 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

18 



134 



Business 



EGAL ASSISTANT (Cont'd) 

FRESHMAN YEAR • Winter Term 

UL2112 Business Law II 3 

NC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

EA 1 101 Litigation 3 

TB 1 103 Business Mathematics 3 

Physical Education 1 

OS 2041 * American National Government 3 



16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR • Fall Term 

CC 1001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 

EA 2151 Torts 3 

EA 2401 Law Office Management 3 

EE1001 Real Estate Principles and Practices -BRE I 4 

ES 1401 Clerical Office Practice 3 



16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR - Winter Term 

3C 1021 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ES 1000 Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

EA2211 Wills, Estates and Trusts ^ 3 

:A 2501 Laws of Domestic Relations > Select two .... (3) 

EA 2721 Federal Income Tax Law J 3 

EA 241 1 Legal Ethics 1 

Physical Education 1 

H1 1100 The Art of Thinking 3 



16 



>OS 101 1 may be substituted. 



ARKETING/MANAGEMENT (A.S. 03-062) 

lis curriculum is designed to give the student meaningful classroom theory in 

anagement and marketing and to relate their course content to practical application. 

FRESHMAN YEAR - First Semester 

SEMESTER 
OURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

MC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

AR 1151* Retail Management 3 

AR 201 1 Principles of Marketing 3 

KA 1949A CO-OP: Merchandising I 3 

TB 1 103 Business Mathematics 3 

15 
FRESHMAN YEAR • Second Semester 

CC 1880** Bookkeeping 3 

MC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

AN 2000 Principles of Management 3 

AR 2101 Salesmanship 3 

KA1949B CO-OP: Merchandising II 3 

15 



135 



Business 



JOU1100 
MAN 2100 
MAR 1311 
MKA2949A 

SOC1200 



MAN 2800 
MHT1210 
MKA2949B 

POS1001** 



SOPHOMORE YEAR - First Semester 

Basic Writing for Mass Communications 

Human Relations 

Advertising/Public Relations 

CO-OP: Merchandising III 

Physical Education 

Introduction to the Social Sciences . . ; 

SOPHOMORE YEAR - Second Semester 

Small Business Management 

Principles of Group Dynamics 

CO-OP: Merchandising IV 

Physical Education 

Introduction to Political Science 

Elective 



16 

3 
3 
3 
1 
3 
3 



16 



'Title was formerly Introduction to Retailing. 
**ACC1001 orACC1021 may be substituted. 
* * *SOC 2000 or PSY 2012 may be substituted. 

PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION (A.A. 03-509) 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDI 

ACC 1001 Principles of Accounting I ' 3 

ACC1021 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

COC1110 Itroduction to Computers 3 

ECO 2013 Principles of Economics I 3 

ECO 2023 Principles of Economics II 3 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAC 1104 College Algebra 3 

PAD 1002 Introduction to Public Administration 3 

PAD 1416 Local Personnel Administration 3 

PAD 1802 Mgt. Practices in Local Government (3) 

PAD 2412 Supervisory Methods in Public Admin (3) 

PAD 2440 Finance in Local Government Opt. 2 (3) 6 

PAD 2845 Elements of Public Works Admin (3) 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

SPC1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

STA2014 Statistics 3 

Literature 3 

Natural Sciences 6 

Physical Education 2 



64 



*HES2121 may be substituted. 
**AMH 2010 or POS 2041 may be substituted. 
136 



Business 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Accounting 

ACC1001 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING I 

This is a basic study of accounting and business practice. It includes the study 
of business papers and recording procedure, the use of journals, controlling 
accounts, and general subsidiary ledgers. It stresses the adjustments at the 
close of the fiscal period, the form and preparation of financial statements, and 
provides an introduction of valuation accounts. A single proprietorship set of 
books is kept as part of the course. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ACC1021 PRINCIPLES OF ACCOUNTING II 

(Prerequisite: ACC 1001 or equivalent) This is a continuation of ACC 1001. It is a 
study of accounting procedures as applied to the partnerships and the cor- 
poration. Topics considered include taxation, formation and dissolution of 
partnerships, organization of the corporation, departmental and manufacturing 
accounting, and the interpretation of financial statements. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & 
Winter terms) 

ACC 1880 BOOKKEEPING 

This course is an application of accounting principles to sole proprietorship. It 
examines the basic structure of accounting and of the accounting equation. 
Each student will complete a practice set in bookkeeping. 3-0-3* 

ACC 2409 COST ACCOUNTING 

(Prerequisite: ACC 1021) This course is a study of the most common cost 
systems with emphasis on cost for materials, labor, overhead, standard costs, 
and cost relationships. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

Banking 

(Prerequisite: for all Banking Courses: BAN 1110) 
BAN 1110 PRINCIPLES OF BANK OPERATIONS 

The economic importance of banks, receiving function, processing of cash 
items, bookkeeping operations, posting systems, paying teller operations, 
collection services, legal relationships with depositors, characteristics of 
negotiable instruments, the savings arid time deposit function, management 
bank funds, loans and investments, general bank accounting, account analysis, 
internal controls, international functional services, trust services, safe deposit 
services, other services, growth of the American banking system, the Federal 
Reserve System, government supervision, banking and public service. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 
BAN 1121 BANK CARDS 

This course presents an overview of the bank card industry with the dual ob- 
jectives of helping the student understand the role of the bank card in the 
economy as well as the basic operational problems involved in the successful 
management of a bank card plan. The interrelated nature of the various bank 
card functions is emphasized. Topics covered are the types of credit cards in 
use and their functions and histories; the cardholder's profile, attitudes, and 
behavior; and credit-card operations — marketing, authorization, customer 
service, cost analysis and control, collection policies and procedures and 
security and fraud. The course also discusses the evolution of credit cards into 
Electronic Funds Transfer, legal developments affecting credit cards, and the 
regulatory environment in which banks operate their card business. 3-0-3* 
(offered upon demand) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

137 



Business 

BAN 1240 INSTALLMENT CREDIT 

(Prerequisite: BUL 1100 and BAN 1110) Evolution of installment credit, in- 
stallment credit in commercial banks, qualifications of a good installment credit 
risk, technique of loan interview and the development of credit information, 
investigation and the credit decision, installment sale financing, inventory 
financing (flooring), rate structure and cost analysis, servicing installment 
credit, collection procedures, business installment credit, special loan 
programs, advertising and business development, installment credit and your 
bank. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

BAN 1303 SAVINGS AND TIME DEPOSIT BANKING 

The role of savings in the economy, forms of financing savings, interests and 
saving, deposit-type savings institutions, types of savings and other time ac- 
counts, calculation of interest payments, economic and legal basis of asset 
management, asset management policies, operations and control, supervision 
of financial institution, examinations and provisions of liquidity, marketing 
savings and time deposits, current problems and issues. 3-0-3* (offered upon 
demand) 

BAN 1800 NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS AND THE PAYMENTS MECHANISM 

The objective of this course is to explore the relevant legal implications of 
normal activities and transactions in bank operations. The treatment is in 
general terms. It is designed to add knowledge of legal principles and reasoning 
to the student's understanding and vocational skill and to influence attitudes of 
bank personnel by providing information about the impact of the law and ap- 
plicable bank regulations rather than the resolution of legal issues or problems. 
The aim is to improve understanding of how the law operates within the 
framework of federal and state banking statutes, court decisions, and ad- 
ministrative regulations. Terminology is designed to avoid misconceptions and 
legal pitfalls. The course opens with an introduction to the Uniform Commercial 
Code and the legal framework of the U.S. commercial banking system. Com- 
mercial paper from inception through issuance (transfer, negotiation, final 
payment, and the rights and duties of the parties involved) and checks (kinds, 
types, environmental characteristics, specific treatment of MICR checks and 
data processing problems, and the evolving paperless electronic payments 
mechanism) are covered in detail. Many of the legal situations that occur in the 
deposit, collection, dishonor and return, payment of checks and other cash 
items, and the relationship of the various parties in bank collection channels are 
explored, as are potential legal relationships between a bank and its depositor 
and some of the legal aspects of other bank service operations. 3-0-3* (offered 
upon demand) 

BAN 1949 COOP: BANKING I 

. This is a coordinated work-study course which reinforces the educational and 
professional growth of the student through parallel involvement in classroom 
studies and field experience in the student's chosen career. The student and 
teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the on-the-job banking 
assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher-coordinator and the 
immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3* 

BAN 2003 ANALYZING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS I 

This course explains and interprets the basic elements of financial statements 
and the tools of analysis. It also considers such special problems as what to do 
for the customer who wants to borrow money. Requires no accounting or credit 
training. Case studies, exercises, and sample statements provide ample op- 
portunity for practice. 3-0-3* 
* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

138 



Business 




BAN 2010 FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEMS 

A study of the history of the Federal Reserve System tracing its origin and the 
various stages of its historical development. A review of the current era par- 
ticularly recent international monetary affairs in which the Federal Reserve 
System has played a role, the International Monetary Fund, more recent 
economic developments and a study of the goals of American monetary police. 
3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

BAN 2120 FUNDAMENTALS OF BANK DATA PROCESSING 

Brief history of banking automation, unit record processing, computer concepts 
and hardware, magnetic ink character recognition program (MICR), account 
numbering systems, preparation for automation (installation and conversion), 
cooperative data processing — services for bank and business customers, 
auditing automated systems, problems and pitfalls, systems design, 
programming basic, a bank application (installment credit system), other bank 
systems, bank information systems. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 
BAN 2150 MARKETING FOR BANKERS 

Functional structure of bank public relations and marketing, staff selection, 
training, and performance; internal communication, physical facilities and 
equipment, marketing and opinion research, policy determination and planning 
for public relations and marketing, publicity, advertising, marketing and selling, 
staff selling, the officer call program, community relations, school relations, 
government relations, relations with banking competitors and other financial 
institutions, stockholder relations, blueprint for a winning bank. 3-0-3* (offered 
upon demand) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

139 



Business 



BAN 2200 CREDIT ADMINISTRATION 

Discussion of policy, the bank credit department, sources of credit information, 
analyzing financial statements, credit correspondence, the credit folder and 
other credit records, unsecured loans to customers, secured loans to the 
customers, loans to small business, installment loans, term loans, interbank 
loans, real estate loans, influence of the Federal Reserve System, investing 
surplus funds of the commercial bank, dealing with embarrassed concerns, 
opportunities and responsibilities of the bank lending officer. 3-0-3* (offered 
upon demand) 

BAN 2201 MANAGEMENT OF COMMERCIAL BANK FUNDS 

This course deals with those necessary principles from which the student can 
derive an adequate philosophy of funds management. Planned to be useful to as 
many different bankers as possible, it covers a broad range of bank situations 
and sizes. It opens with a discussion of the overall banking environment, then 
zeroes in on individual bank environment and discusses various facets of bank 
operations and their relationships with the funds management functions. The 
text used for the course was co-authored by a prominent banker and a finance 
professor. In their view, none of the commercial banking functions can achieve 
maximum potential profit for the bank unless the funds management function is 
efficiently planned and executed. Considerable emphasis is placed on the 
proper organizational format to achieve this potential. 3-0-3* (offered upon 
demand) 

BAN 2204 INTRODUCTION TO COMMERCIAL LENDING 

This course provides an overview of the commercial lending function. It is 
targeted to management trainees and junior management, and is divided into 
four sections: commercial lending overview, the lending process, portfolio 
management, and regulation and business development. Some specific topics: 
the commercial loan customer, types of commercial loans, the loan decision 
process (information gathering, analysis), cost analysis, control and 
profitability, and the regulatory and legal environment. 3-0-3* (offered Winter 
term) 

BAN 2210 ANALYZING FINANCIAL STATEMENTS II 

Basic considerations in statement analysis, details of financial statements (the 
balance sheet, profit and loss statement, reconcilement of net worth), basic 
ratios, analysis by internal comparison, working capital changes-peak debt 
position, analysis by external comparison, analysis of receivables, analysis of 
inventories, balance sheet analysis, profit and loss analysis, interim trial 
balances, consolidated statements, budgets and projection. 3-0-3* (offered 
upon demand) 
BAN 2230 BANK INVESTMENTS 

The economic background of investments, federal government securities, 
federal agency securities, municipal securities, general obligation bonds, 
revenue bonds, market for Treasury and municipal securities, general nature of 
bank liquidity, primary reserves, secondary reserves, security prices, yield 
curves and their uses, safety considerations, tax and related considerations, 
•investment policies. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
140 



BAN 2400 TRUST FUNCTIONS AND SERVICES Business 

Property and property rights, wills, settlement of estates, responsibilities of 
executors and administrators, personal trusts, insurance trusts, administration 
of personal trusts, general responsibilities of trustees, general responsibilities 
of investment procedures of trustees, essential features of personal trust in- 
struments, guardianships, personal agencies, responsibilities of personal 
agents, corporate trusts, administration of corporate trusts, corporate agencies, 
employee trusts, community trusts, institutional trusts, and agencies; history of 
trust services, historical background of trust institutions. 3-0-3* 

BAN 2700 FINANCING BUSINESS ENTERPRISE 

Business finance in the American economy, basic problems, unincorporated 
business, the corporation, capitalization, the financial plan, equity capital, 
creditor capital, intermediate-term capital, short-term credit, sale of common 
stock to special groups, public issues and direct placement of securities, 
financial policies-use of securities, working capital and turnover ratios, cash 
flow and budgets, management and measurement of earnings, surplus and 
dividends, merger and consolidation, financial strain and business failure, 
financial readjustments and bankruptcy, reorganization, social aspects of 
business finance. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

BAN 2720 BANK MANAGEMENT 

The nature and objectives of banking, formulations of objectives and policies, 
organizational planning, the manning of the organizational structure, 
management in action, management controls, management and specific func- 
tions, the deposit function, the employment of bank funds, loans and in- 
vestments, the trust function, other service functions, the art of management. 3- 
0-3* 

BAN 2949 CO-OP: BANKING II 

This course is a continuation of BAN 1949. 1-10-3* 

FIN 1230 MONEY AND BANKING 

Financial institutions, characteristics of money, structure of the commercial 
banking system, creation of bank deposits, cash assets of banks, secondary 
reserves, earning assets, banking in the United States to 1913, the Federal 
Reserve System, Federal Reserve credit, sources and uses of member bank 
reserves, the money market, interest rates, and liquidity. Federal Reserve 
policies and operations in the money market. Treasury operations in the money 
market, money and incomes, money and the price level, recent monetary 
problems, international finance. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

Law 

BUL1658 LAW AND BANKING 

Formation of contracts, consideration, the statute of frauds, capacity and 
parties to contract, performance and termination of contracts, defenses, 
remedies, and damages, quasi-contracts, commercial paper bank deposits and 
bank collections, sales of personal property, documents of title, secured 
transactions, agencies, partnerships, corporations personal property, real 
property, estates and trusts, torts and crimes, miscellaneous (surveyship, 
bankruptcy, bulk transfers). 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 
BUL2111 BUSINESS LAW I 

This is a general introduction to law which includes a discussion of the 
following: courts and legal procedures, law and society, definitions, 
classifications, and systems of law based on the supreme law of the land. A brief 
review of the tribunals for administering justice and discussion of actions will 
be given. Topics on contracts, torts, sales (warranties and liabilities), negotiable 
instruments, bailor and bailee and personal property (rights and acquisition) will 
be studied. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 
* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 141 



Business 

BUL2112 BUSINESS LAW II 

This course is a continuation of BUL 21 1 1 and includes a study of the following: 
principal and agent, carriers, insurer and insured, relation of partnerships, 
corporation and stockholders, landlord and tenant, employer and employee, 
business crimes, bankruptcy and creditors. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

COA 1100 CONSUMER EDUCATION 

Concepts relating to consumer and personal financial decisions. Teaching an 
individual to think for himself in the marketplace, to recognize and use 
educational advertising, to spend income to obtain the greatest personal 
satisfaction, to manage money to attain a particular life style. 3-0-3* (offered 
upon demand) 

COE 2949 COOP: SUCCESSFUL EMPLOYABILITY TECHNIQUES 

This course will equip students with the skills and procedures involved in fin- 
ding full- or part-time employment. The students will develop a resume, letters of 
applications, interviewing techniques, career goals and objectives and be tested 
using various occupational and personality tests, to aid in their career choice. 1- 
0-1* 

Clothing and Textiles 

CTE 1310 ELEMENTS OF CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION 

Emphasis is placed on learning to take accurate measurements and construct 
proper fitting garments through the use of commercial patterns and fun- 
damental techniques of sewing. 2-2-3* (offered upon demand) 

CTE 1705 FASHION THEORY 

The art principles and elements of design with a theoretical and practical ap- 
proach as related to wearing apparel. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

CTE 1731 TRADE SKETCHING 

Simple method of drawing and coloring apparel design sketches. 3-0-3* (offered 
upon demand) 

CTE 1743 CREATIVE PATTERN MAKING I 

Learning the basic steps in the development of dress patterns by the flat pattern 
drafting method. Developing the hip length sloper to personal measurements. 
Designing and making a pattern for a simple basic dress. 3-0-3* (offered upon 
demand) 

CTE 1 744 CREATIVE PATTERN MAKING II 

(Prerequisite: CTE 1743) Instruction in the basic principles of draping the basic 
slopers and the transferring of a muslin into a paper pattern, stressing the im- 
portance of accurate pattern construction. A continuation of the drafting and 
flat pattern method. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

CTE 1949 CO-OP: HOME ECONOMICS I 

This is a coordinated work-study program which reinforces Ihe educational and 
professional growth of the student through parallel involvement in classroom 
studies and field experience in the student's chosen career. The student and 
teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the on-the-job home 
economics assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher- 
coordinator and the immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3* 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
142 



Business 



CTE 2200 COSTUME SELECTION 

A study of the sociological and psychological influences in the evolvement of 
fashion as applied to individual decisions in clothing selection. The course 
includes figure analysis, personal improvement, wardrobe planning, care and 
maintenance of clothing. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

CTE 2340 CLOTHING CONSTRUCTION 

(Prerequisite: CTE 1310C) This is further application of the sewing principles and 
techniques as they are used to achieve the custom made look in clothing 
suitable to the individual. 2-2-3* (offered upon demand) 

CTE 2514 FASHION HISTORY 

Studying trends, line, and design in clothfng styles throughout the ages. 3-0-3* 
(offered upon demand) 

CTE 2745 FASHION DESIGN - DRAPING 

(Prerequisite: CTE 1744) Advanced study of the flat pattern method and draping 
method in the making of patterns from sketches. Grading of patterns and the 
beginning of custom tailoring procedures will be introduced. 3-0-3* (offered 
upon demand) 

CTE 2748 APPLIED FASHION DESIGN 

(Prerequisite: CTE 2745) Advanced study of tailoring procedures. Advanced 
designing is emphasized as the student designs a collection of styles which she 
sketches, makes the pattern, drapes and constructs. 3-0-3* (offered upon 
demand) 

CTE 2949 CO-OP: HOME ECONOMICS II 

This course is a continuation of CTE 1949. 1-10-3* 

Dietetics 

DIE 1201 NUTRITION - HEALTH & DISEASE I 

Basic principles of nutrition for students in the nursing program. 2-0-2* (offered 
Fall /Winter terms) 
DIE 1202 NUTRITION — HEALTH & DISEASE II 

(Prerequisite: DIE 1201) The study of nutrition in the periods of maternity, in- 
fancy, childhood and adolescence. 1-0-1 * (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

Economics 

ECO 2000 INTRODUCTION TO ECONOMICS 

A one-term course designed to acquaint the student who plans no further study 
in economics with the objectives, analytical methods, and terminology of the 
subject. Some of the areas covered will be: historical background; scarcity and 
the free market system; production organization and production of the entire 
economy; banking and the money supply; international trade; current economic 
problems. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ECO 2005 ECONOMICS 

Economic principles, the governmental and banking institutions which have an 
effect on the national economy, national income, theory and application of price 
determination, business cycles, money and banking, monetary and fiscal policy, 
and international trade and finance. 3-0-3* 

ECO 2013 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS I 

The course deals with the nature and scope of economics. It includes the basic 
theory of supply and demand, the capitalist system, national income ac- 
counting, the business cycle, the theory of determination of national income 
and employment, money and banking, and problems of economic growth. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 
* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 14 3 



Business 



ECO 2023 PRINCIPLES OF ECONOMICS II 

(Prerequisite: ECO 2013) This course is a continuation of ECO 2013 into the 
areas of production and distribution. Topics considered include: the nature of 
production, determining production costs, price determination, each factor of 
production and its share in the income and problems of monopoly. An attempt is 
made throughout to relate the principles of economics to the problems of the 
American economy, and to show the effect of the economic factors upon policy 
formation. The course also includes a brief discussion of alternate economic 
systems. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

Food Service Systems 

FSS1112 FOOD FOR CHILDREN 

Introducing students to the problems involved with feeding children. Em- 
phasizing principles of food preparation, planning menus to meet children's 
nutritional needs and motivating children to practice good eating habits. 3-0-3* 
(offered upon demand) 

FSS 1170 PRACTICUM: FOODS FOR CHILDREN 

Students enrolled in this course will be responsible for planning, purchasing, 
preparing and serving lunch to the children in the Center for Early Learning. 0-6- 
3* (offered upon demand) 

FSS 1210 FOOD FOR THE FAMILY 

Principles of food selection, preparation and meal management. Buying food, 
serving meals and managing time, money and energy in the kitchen. 2-2-3* 
(offered upon demand) 

FSS 1300 INTRODUCTION TO FOOD SERVICE MANAGEMENT 

An introduction to managerial techniques in operating a food service 
establishment. It deals with historically significant developments, basic prin- 
ciples, and fundamental processes underlying food preparation, service, and 
other operational procedures. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

FSS 2100 PURCHASING MANAGEMENT 

The major emphasis will be upon presentation of materials and managerial 
information needed for the operation of a club, hotel, motel, or food 
establishment. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

FSS 2221 INTRODUCTION TO COMMERCIAL FOOD PRODUCTION 

A course designed to expose the student to commercial food preparation. The 
course includes classroom instruction in cooking terminology, procedures and 
equipment. The laboratory experience involves preparation of food items 
utilizing the terminology, procedures and equipment learned in the classroom. 
2-4-4* (offered Fall term) 

FSS 2222 INTERMEDIATE FOOD PREPARATION 

(Prerequisite: FSS 2221 or permission of academic advisor) A continued study of 
the basic concepts and techniques learned in the introductory course. It allows 
the student to put into practice and further elaborate on culinary skills learned. 
The emphasis is on the refinement of basic skills through the actual planning 
and carrying out of complete offerings as typified in a small, medium, or large 
size operation. All students would be required to rotate among the stations of a 
commercial kitchen and assume all involved responsibilities. 2-4-4* (offered 
Winter term) 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
144 



Business 



1S2242 INTERNATIONAL CUISINE 

(Prerequisite: FSS 2221 or permission of academic advisor) The students are 
required to research and prepare menus representative of different countries 
and cultures. Emphasis will be given to the cuisines included in each module: 

Module A: French Cuisine 

Module B: Spanish Cookery 

Module C: Italian Cuisine 
Five weeks each. 3-6-6* (offered Winter term) 
S 2251 OPERATIONAL PROCEDURES OF QUANTITY FOOD SERVICE 

This course is designed to study the basic principles and analysis of food 
management problems. Phases of the work will include work plans and 
schedules, labor and food cost control, purchasing, equipment use and care, 
sanitation and safety. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 
S 2284 ADVANCED FOOD PREPARATION 

A course dealing with the production problems which beset various types of 
food services. Emphasis will be given to each type of food service covered in 
each module: 

Module A: Fast Food Service 

Module B: Banquet Service 

Module C: Catering 
Five weeks each. 3-6-6* (offered Fall term) 
S 2401 HOTEL-MOTEL PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 

In this course a study is made of layouts, specifications, maintenance of 
equipment, furniture, furnishings, and decor for clubs, motels, and related in- 
stitutions. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 
BS2500 FOOD AND BEVERAGE CONTROL 

An in-depth study of various established cost control systems of hotels and 
restaurants in purchasing, allocation, and use of both foods and beverages to 
make for a profitable and economical operation. 2-0-2* (offered Fall term) 

sspitality, Food, Tourism 

FT 1000 INTRODUCTION TO THE HOSPITALITY BUSINESS 

The historical background of the hotel-motel industry, its scope in Palm Beach 
County, the State of Florida, and the United States. A study of departmental 
functions and job responsibilities in a small, medium, and large hotel and motel. 
3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ffT 1949 COOP: HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT I 

This is a coordinated work-study program which reinforces the educational and 
professional growth of the student through parallel involvement in classroom 
studies and field experience in the student's chosen career. The student and 
teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the on-the-job hospitality 
management assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher- 
coordinator and the immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-15-4* 

: T2220 PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN THE HOSPITALITY 
BUSINESS 
This course is designed to study the basic principles and analysis of managerial 
problems, including job analysis methods, selection, control, and supervision of 
personnel. Other phases of the work include work plans and schedules, labor 
and cost control, legal requirements, and safety controls. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & 
Winter terms) 

Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

145 



Business 



HFT 2250 HOTEL-MOTEL MANAGEMENT PRACTICES 

This course explores special management problems as found in hotels, motels, 

clubs, and institutions. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 
HFT 2300 HOUSEKEEPING MANAGEMENT 

This is a survey course designed to provide the student with a general un 

derstanding of the organization, duties, and administration of institutiona 

housekeeping. It also includes interior decoration, purchase of furniture, car 

peting, linens, and supplies. Maintenance and engineering of a practical nature 

are studied. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 
HFT 2410 HOTEL-MOTEL FRONT OFFICE ADMINISTRATION AND PROCEDURES 

A study of the functions, procedures and organization of the front office 

department in a medium and large hotel, with emphasis on reservations anc 

front office psychology. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 
HFT 2510 SALES PROMOTION AND ADVERTISING IN HOTELS AND FOOD SER 
VICE ESTABLISHMENTS 

A study of advertising principles as they relate to the promotion of sales ir 

hotels and restaurants. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 
HFT 2600 LEGAL ASPECTS OF HOTEL ADMINISTRATION 

A study of the laws applicable to the ownership and operation of places ol 

public hospitality. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 
HFT 2949 CO-OP: HOSPITALITY MANAGEMENT II 

This course is a continuation of HFT 1949. 1-15-4* 
Human Nutrition 
HUN 1012 NUTRITION — FOR DENTAL HEALTH SERVICES 

Elements of nutrition with emphasis placed on concerns for good dental healtl 

and preventive dentistry. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 
HUN 1202 ELEMENTS OF NUTRITION 

Fundamental principles, findings, concepts, and applications of norma 

nutrition. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

Legal Assistant 

LEA 1011 LEGAL WRITING AND RESEARCH 

This course shall provide the student with information on how to write lega 
memoranda and briefs for both trial and appellate work. It also provides th< 
student with an in-depth examination of the law library and the process of lega 
research. 3-0-3* 

LEA 1101 LITIGATION 

This course shall emphasize the court system and the litigation procedures 
the state of Florida. Aspects of civil and criminal litigation shall be studied 
including preliminary interviews with clients, investigation and marshalling o 
facts, drafting of all pleadings, and motion practice. 3-0-3* 

LEA 2151 TORTS 

In this course, the student shall become familiar with the basic concepts of tor 
law. Discussion shall involve liability of the individual, in addition to specifiec 
acts committed. 3-0-3* 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
146 



Business 

•A 2211 WILLS, ESTATES AND TRUSTS 

This course is designed to offer the legal assistant trainee a general un- 
derstanding of the techniques and procedures involved in the preparation of 
wills and trusts; estate planning; income, gift and inheritance taxes; probating 
of estates and estate accounting. 3-0-3* 

!A 2401 LAW OFFICE MANAGEMENT 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with fundamentals of 
management in general and application to the law office, including a study of 
office equipment utilized in a law office, word processing system, filing system, 
library management, accounting and billing procedures. 3-0-3* 

A 2411 LEGAL ETHICS 

This course is designed to examine the role of the lawyer and legal assistant in 
modern society with emphasis on the ethical and professional practice stan- 
dards applicable to both. 1-0-1 * 

A 2501 LAWS OF DOMESTIC RELATIONS 

The study of such topics as divorce, separation, custody, legitimacy, adoption, 
name change, guardianship, support, court procedures, separation agreements, 
and property disposition. 3-0-3* 

A 2721 FEDERAL INCOME TAX LAW 

The student in this course shall become familiar with specialized sections of the 
Internal Revenue Code and the legal ramifications which arise therefrom. 3-0-3* 

magement 

VN 1700 INTRODUCTION TO BUSINESS 

The objectives of this course are three-fold: (1) to give the student beginning his 
education for business the opportunity to learn what business is about, and to 
see it in its entirety before studying each of its parts intensively. (2) to help the 
student acquire a technical vocabulary which will prove of inestimable value in 
later courses and reading business periodicals, and (3) to help the student 
acquire a better understanding of the free enterprise system and its working. 3- 
0-3* (offered Fal I & Wi nter terms) 

VN 1701 BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 

The importance of business organization in our economy, legal forms of 
business organization; bases of management decisions, coordination of 
business functions, fundamentals of financial management, the financing of 
business, problems and policies of financial administration, manufacturing 
procedures and production costs, the place of materials in production, plant and 
machinery in production, coordination of men and machinery, employer- 
employee relations, wages and other compensation, the development of in- 
. dustrial relations, collective bargaining, the functions of marketing, 
wholesaling, retailing, marketing policies, sales management, accounting, 
statistics, and forecasting the budget and coordination, effective public 
relations. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

IN 1949A CO-OP: MIDMANAGEMENT I 

This is a coordinated work-study program which reinforces the educational and 
professional growth of the student through parallel involvement in classroom 
studies and field experience in the student's chosen career. The student and 
teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the on-the-job mid- 
management assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher- 
coordinator and the immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3* 

VN1949B CO-OP: MIDMANAGEMENT II 

This course is a continuation of MAN 1949A. 1-10-3* 

ecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

147 



Business 

MAN 2000 PRINCIPLES OF MANAGEMENT 

A basic study of the principles of management, planning, organizing, actuatir 
and controlling is given in this course. It stresses the broad and import* 
concept of management, as a separate entity, the principles and practices whi 
are applicable to many varied activities such as production, personn 
marketing, finance, government, education, agriculture, and the armed forces 
0-3* (offered upon demand) 

MAN 2100 SUPERVISION - HUMAN RELATIONS IN BUSINESS 

This course helps formulate a set of objectives in human relations and develo 
techniques for accomplishing these objectives. Among the topics studied a 
motivation, morale, productivity, organization, communications, work and 
centives, leadership, and the executive and his roles. 3-0-3* (offered Fall 
Winter terms) 

MAN 2340 PRINCIPLES OF SUPERVISION 

The purpose of this course is to present the important information a supervis 
needs to know about his job in dealing with people, money, machines, materia 
and himself. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

MAN 2342 SUPERVISION AND PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 

Organizational structure, the supervisor's job, automation and the supervis 
growth of the human relations concept, communication, the supervisor as 
manager, recruitment and selection of employees, induction of the new e 
ployee, training, development of desirable attitudes, production planning, i 
plementation of policies and procedures, the giving of orders, maintenance 
production, maintenance of discipline, the handling of grievances, reports 
higher management, personnel appraisal and counseling, salary administratl 
and related controls, operations improvement, cost control, quality contr 
supervision tomorrow. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

MAN 2500 PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT 

A study of the various phases of production control and the elements whi 
contribute to a successful operation — production forecasting, produ 
development, control of materials, routing, scheduling, and follow-up 
studied in a sequence in terms of their significance and their relationship 
production control. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

MAN 2800 SMALL BUSINESS MANAGEMENT 

A study of the accepted basic principles of small business management. Pi 
ticular attention will be given to business functions (sales, productio 
procurement, personnel, finance and law) as they affect the operation 
American small business. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

MAN 2949A CO-OP: MIDMANAGEMENT III 

This course is a continuation of MAN 1949B. 1-10-3* 

MAN 2949B CO-OP: MIDMANAGEMENT IV 

This course is a continuation of MAN 2949A. 1-10-3* 

Marketing 

MAR 1151 RETAIL MANAGEMENT 

A study of the principles, procedures, and techniques of retailing, buyin 
pricing merchandise, and of determining consumer demand. Particular attentic 
will be given to the problems of when and how to buy, and sources of supp 
The organization and function of major divisions in retail establishments a 
studied to promote an understanding of the varied responsibilities and activitii 
of buyers. Field trips will supplement class lectures and discussions. 3-0- 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

148 



Business 



lR 1 152 RETAIL MANAGEMENT AND PERSONNEL PROBLEMS 

An integrated study of retail management functions, decision making, and 
problems will be made. The emphasis will be on operations, merchandising, and 
sales promotion and the problems involved. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

R 1311 ADVERTISING/PUBLIC RELATIONS 

This course has been planned for students wanting strong preparation in the 
field of advertising and public relations. Students learn technical processes, 
concepts of layouts, visual communications and proceed to more complicated 
and extensive advertising assignments. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 
IR2011 PRINCIPLES OF MARKETING 

This course presents a broad picture of the structure and functions of 
marketing. A rather detailed treatment is given to the retailing of consumer's 
goods and the marketing of industrial goods marketing research, policies and 
practices; and marketing activities of the government. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & 
Winter terms) 

R2101 SALESMANSHIP 

This course is designed as a comprehensive sales training program. The primary 
objective is to measurably develop the sales persuasive skill of each student. 
The essential selling theories and principles are developed and practiced in 
simulated selling situations utilizing class presentations and closed circuit T.V. 
The student will leave the class with a demonstrable ability to convert current 
sales concepts into successful on-job performance. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter 
terms) 
[A 1161 PRODUCT MERCHANDISING 

A study of the history, style, construction, and quality of home furnishings. 
Basic concepts of the application of color, line, and design to fashion will be 
included. Problems in fashion coordination and the analysis of fashion trends 
will be covered. A study of the materials, manufacture, and sources involved in 
the home furnishings division. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

A 1402 FASHION MERCHANDISING 

A study of the style, construction, and quality of men's, women's, and children's 
ready-to-wear apparel. Fashion history trends, coordination, and the application 
of color, line and design to ready-to-wear fashions are studied. 3-0-3* (offered 
Fall term) 

A 1411 TEXTILES 

A study of the characteristics, care, and uses of major textiles, fibers, and 
fabrics. Attention is given to the processes of weaving, dyeing, printing, and 
finishing. Practice in identification of fibers, weaves, and fabric finishes is also 
included. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

A1949A CO-OP: MERCHANDISING I 

This is a coordinated work-study program which reinforces the educational and 
professional growth of the student through parallel involvement in classroom 
studies and field experience in the student's chosen career. The student and 
teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the on-the-job merchandising 
assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher-coordinator and the 
immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3* 

A1949B CO-OP: MERCHANDISING II 

This course is a continuation of MKA 1949A. 1-10-3* 



Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

149 



Business 



MKA 2949A CO-OP: MERCHANDISING III 

This is a coordinated work-study program which reinforces the educational a 
professional growth of the student through parallel involvement in classroc 
studies and field experience in the student's chosen career. The student a 
teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the on-the-job merchandisi 
assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher-coordinator and t 
immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3* 
MKA2949B CO-OP: MERCHANDISING IV 

This course is a continuation of MKA 2949A. 1-10-3* 

Mathematics: Technology and Business 
MTB1103 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS 

This course includes information and practice in practical business situatio 
involving: bank and sales records, business percentages, financial charge 
payrolls and taxes, statistics and computers, financial statements, insurant 
bonds, stocks and annuities. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

Public Administration 

PAD 1002 INTRODUCTION TO PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

The bases of administration and administrative decision-making. A gene 
study of organizational structure and processes: the division of work, authori 
status systems, communication and control. Relation of policy to < 
ministration. 3-0-3* 
PAD 1416 LOCAL PERSONNEL ADMINISTRATION 

Examination of recruitment, examination, and promotion procedures for pub 
service personnel. The relationship of formal and informal communicati 
processes in lower administrative echelons as they bear on the formulation a 
implementation of personnel policies. 3-0-3* 

PAD 1802 MANAGEMENT PRACTICES IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

Designed to give an overview of major objectives, methods and procedures 
each of the "line activities" of small municipal governments, with emphasis 
the staff aspects of the chief administrator such as: planning, financing, p< 
sonnel, trend analysis and public relations. 3-0-3* 

PAD 2412 SUPERVISORY METHODS IN PUBLIC ADMINISTRATION 

A program designed for supervisors and administrators stressing leadersh 
and human relations. The thrust of the course is aimed at the creation ai 
maintenance of a climate of participation based on communication and 
fective leadership. 3-0-3* 

PAD 2200 FINANCE IN LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

This course is designed to study local governmental financial processes. The 
include revenue and expenditures. The emphasis will be on budgeting, pi 
chasing, service charge administration and intragovernment financial prograrr 
3-0-3* 

PAD 2845 ELEMENTS OF PUBLIC WORKS ADMINISTRATION 

This course is designed to relate public works to other municipal functions or 
basis of measured achievement in areas of personnel, vehicle maintenanc 
sewage, cost accounting. The impact of public works on ecology, zonir 
density and financing as considered from the view of the administrator. 3-0-3* 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
150 



Business 
I Estate 
: 1000 REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES — BRE I 

A study of the basic principles, practices and theories of real property, its 
economic value, legal implications, and relationship to the salesperson and 
broker. Includes a study of Florida Real Estate License Law. Successful com- 
pletion required by Florida Real Estate Commission prior to filing application for 
state license examination for salesperson. 4-0-4* (offered all terms) 

E 1 100 REAL ESTATE APPRAISAL I 

(Prerequisite: REE 1000 or consent of instructor) The appraisal process will be 
examined and applied in an analytic approach to determine residential property 
value on a cost, market, and income basis. Consideration will be directed to 
such factors as neighborhood and, site analysis, residential style, functional 
utility, building cost estimates and depreciation. 3-0-3* (offered on demand) 

E 1200 REAL ESTATE FINANCE 

(Prerequisite: REE 1000 or consent of instructor) A study of financial analysis, 
development financing, land acquisition, and structuring of real estate projects. 
Traditional and creative concepts, mechanisms for construction and permanent 
financing of single family housing, condominiums, shopping centers, office 
buildings, industrial plants and rental apartment buildings will be covered. Loan 
contracts, mortgage analysis, governmental agencies and public policies will be 
reviewed. 3-0-3* (offered on demand) 
1 949 CO-OP: REAL ESTATE I 
This is a coordinated work-study program which reinforces the educational and 
professional growth of the student through parallel involvement in classroom 
studies and field experience in the student's chosen career. The student and 
teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the on-the-job real estate 
assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher-coordinator and the 
immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3* 
2220 REAL ESTATE FOR BANKERS 
This course provides a background in the varied real estate mortgage credit 
operations of commercial banks. It treats the main areas of real estate by 
concentrating on the following broad areas: 1) the manner in which funds are 
channeled into the mortgage markets; 2) the financing of residential property; 3) 
the financing of special purpose property; and 4) the administrative tasks 
common to most mortgage departments. An introduction to the vocabulary of 
real estate serves as the starting point for a consideration of individual topics 
such as the sources of mortgage credit, federal assistance in the mortgage 
market, and financing of single-family homes, condominiums, industrial and 
agricultural properties, and shopping centers. The analysis of mortgage credit, 
as well as the policies related to collection, are also covered, as are the ad- 
ministration of a bank's mortgage portfolio and the analysis of real estate in- 
vestment yields. 3-0-3* (offered on demand) 

E 2801 REAL ESTATE PRINCIPLES AND PRACTICES — BRE II 

(Prerequisite: active holder of Florida Real Estate Salesman's license for at least 
6 months) A comprehensive course covering fields of study and materials 
required by the Florida Real Estate Commission to qualify for the Florida State 
Real Estate Broker's license. Applications must be approved before students 
are admitted to the course. 4-0-4* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

3 2930 ABSTRACTS AND TITLES I 

This course shall include a study of: History of Florida titles; abstracts and 
researching; conveyances and encumbrances; title insurance; escrows and 
closings; land descriptions; and legal problems affecting land titles. 3-0-3* 
(offered on demand) 

ecture-Lab-Credit Hours 151 



Business 

REE 2931 ABSTRACTS AND TITLES II 

(Prerequisite: REE 2930) This course shall be an intermediate level study relati 

to title matters, especially appropriate to Palm Beach County. Emphasis will 

placed on three areas: 1) Land title description in detail; 2) Title examination a 

legal interpretations leading toward issuance of title insurance; 3) Title 

surance, escrows and closings. (Available for students who have compli 

Abstracts and Titles I, or those whose experience meets with the approval of 

instructor.) 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

NOTE: Successful completion of the two courses listed above should ass 

those individuals who are interested in pursuing the "C.L.S." designati 

(Certified Land-Title Searcher). It is suggested that interested individu 

contact the Florida Land Title Association, 2003 Apalachee Parkw 

Suite 101, Tallahassee, Florida 32301, for further details a 

requirements, or consult with one of our instructors in the abc 

referenced courses. 

REE 2949 CO-OP: REAL ESTATE II 

This course is a continuation of REE 1949C. 1-10-3* 

Risk Management and Insurance 
ACC2009 ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE 

Basic accounting principles including data accumulation systems, inco 
measurement, valuation of assets and liabilities, and financial statem 
analysis. The accounting process from the recording of a business transact 
in the books of account to the final preparation of financial statements. Vari 
sources of short-term, intermediate-term, and long-term funds available 
business enterprise. 3-0-3* 

ACC2509 INCOME TAXATION 

The federal income tax system with particular reference to the taxation of 
insurance and annuities. The income taxation of individuals, sole proprie 
ships, partnerships, corporations, trusts, and estates. 3-0-3* 

FIN 2110 INVESTMENTS AND FAMILY FINANCIAL MANAGEMENT 

Various aspects of investment principles and their application to family finan 
Yields, limited income securities, investment markets, and valuation of com 
stock. Also, family budgeting property and liability insurance, mutual fun 
variable annuities, and.aspects of other investment media. 3-0-3* 

RM1 1010 PRINCIPLES OF RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE 

This course will describe the risk management framework and discuss the 
surance environment, basic legal concepts, and fundamentals of insura 
contracts. 3-0-3* 

**RM! 1015 GENERAL PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE 

A study of basic principles that underlie the entire field of insurance as wel 
the nature and operation of the insurance business. This course is 
equivalent of the course listed as INS 21 in the Insurance Institute of Amer 
(I I A) catalog. 3-0-3* 

RM1 1020 PRINCIPLES OF INSURANCE PRODUCTION 

This course provides a comprehensive study of the insurance sales proc 
with special attention given to important personal and commercial lines 
surance contracts and coverages. Emphasis" is placed on a "needs" approacl 
selling the most up-to-date policies and on developing a programmed portf< 
of interrelated insurance coverages. A combination of coverage analysis 
case studies of factual situations is used to illustrate insurance needs and uj 
Risk management as a selling tool is presented. 3-0-3* 
* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

152 



Business 

RM1 1022 MULTIPLE LINES INSURANCE PRODUCTION 

This course is an introduction to commercial insurance contracts and coverages 
applicable to businesses and institutional enterprises. Emphasis is placed on 
selling broad multi-peril package policies and important specialty lines of in- 
surance. The practice of identifying commercial account sales opportunities is 
developed by using case studies of various businesses. 3-0-3* 

RMI1112 CASUALTY INSURANCE 

(Prerequisite: RMI 1015 or consent of instructor) A study of coverages, policy 
provisions, and concepts to liability insurance policies, suretyship, the liability 
insurance aspects of multi-line contracts, and life, health, and social coverages. 
3-0-3* 

***RMI1210 PROPERTY INSURANCE 

(Prerequisite: RMI 1015 or consent of instructor) A study of coverages, policy 
provisions, and concepts common to property insurance, including the standard 
fire policy, extended coverage endorsement, dwelling forms, crime insurance, 
business interruption forms, inland and ocean marine coverages, and the 
property coverages of various personal and commercial multiple-line contracts. 
This course is the equivalent of the course listed as INS 22 in the Insurance 
Institute of America (IIA) catalog. 3-0-3* 

RM1 1782 PERSONAL RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE 

This course will apply the risk management process and concepts to individual 
and family exposures. The readings and case studies will illustrate the role of 
property and liability insurance, life and health insurance, social insurance, 
employee benefits, and coordinated insurance buying in personal risk 
management. 3-0-3* 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
Examinations for Licensure: 

**Students who give evidence of successful mastery of concepts presented in RMI 
1015 should be prepared to sit for the following license exams: 
2-10 Ordinary Combination Life Including Disability 
2-12 Fraternal Benefit 
2-13 Industrial Lite Including Disability 
2-14 Ordinary-Variable Annuity 
2-16 Ordinary Life 

2-18 Ordinary Life Including Disability 
2-21 Motor Vehicle Physical Damage 
***Students who give evidence of successful mastery of concepts presented in RMI 
1210 should be prepared to sit for the following state license exam: 4-20 Solicitor 
RM1 1783 COMMERCIAL PROPERTY RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE 

This course will begin with commercial property risk analysis and measurement 
and then examine the major commercial property policies and forms — fire and 
allied lines, business interruption, ocean and inland marine, crime and com- 
bination policies. Noninsurance techniques, such as loss control and risk 
transfer, will also be discussed. 3-0-3* 
RM1 1784 COMMERCIAL LIABILITY RISK MANAGEMENT AND INSURANCE 

This course will analyze the major sources of liability loss exposures and then 
examine the insurance coverages designed to meet those exposures. Premises 
and operations, products and completed operations, contractual and protective 
liability, employers liability and workers' compensation, motor vehicles, and 
professional liability will be discussed along with surety bonds. 3-0-3* 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

153 



Business 

RMI 2050 ECONOMICS 

This course will cover general economic principles at both the macro and micro 
levels. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2110 ECONOMIC SECURITY AND INDIVIDUAL LIFE INSURANCE 

Economic security needs, human behavior, professionalism and ethics in life 
and health insurance. Individual life, health and annuity contracts. Life in- 
surance programming. Types of insurers, investments, financial statements, 
risk selection, taxation and regulation of companies. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2130 GROUP INSURANCE AND SOCIAL INSURANCE 

Analysis of group life and health insurance, including products, marketing, 
underwriting, reinsurance, premiums, and reserves. Also, varous governmental 
programs related to the economic problems of death, old age, unemployment, 
and disability. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2150 PENSION PLANNING 

Basic features of pension plans. Cost factors, funding instruments, and tax 
considerations involved in private pensions, profit-sharing plans and tax- 
deferred annuities. Also, thrift and savings plans and plans for the self- 
employed. Effect of Employees Retirement Income Security Act of 1974 on 
covered areas. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2320 BUSINESS INSURANCE 

Business uses of life and health insurance, including proprietorship, part- 
nership and corporation continuation problems and their solutions through the 
use of buy-sell agreements properly funded to preserve and distribute business 
values. Other business uses of life and health insurance, such as key man in- 
surance, nonqualified deferred compensation plans and split-dollar plans. Also, 
corporate recapitalizations, professional corporations and business uses of 
property and liability insurance. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2430 LIFE INSURANCE LAW AND MATHEMATICS 

Legal aspects of contract formation, policy provisions, assignments, ownership 
rights, creditor rights, beneficiary designations, and disposition of life in- 
surance proceeds. Also, the mathematics of life insurance as related to 
premiums, reserves, nonforfeiture values, surplus and dividends. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2750 ACCOUNTING AND FINANCE 

This course will provide a generalized collegiate-level treatment of basic ac- 
counting and finance principles. Some assignments will specifically relate to 
property and liability insurance company accounting and finance. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2780 INSURANCE ISSUES AND PROFESSIONAL ETHICS 

The first twelve assignments in this course will analyze significant problems and 
issues that impact on the insurance industry. The three concluding assignments 
will focus on professional ethics in general and the American Institute Code of 
Professional Ethics in particular. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2784 MARKETING AND AGENCY OPERATIONS 

This course is an overview of the functional areas of general agency operations. 
Topics studied include: selecting, training, and retaining sales personnel; 
developing and implementing a marketing plan; understanding functional 
operations — sales, personnel administration, record keeping, accounting and 
finance; dealing with insurance companies; promoting personal and agency 
growth through the development of sales, time and control plans. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2785 INSURANCE COMPANY OPERATIONS 

This course will examine insurance marketing, underwriting, reinsurance, rate 
making, claims and adjusting, loss control activities, and other insurer functions 
and activities. 3-0-3* 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

154 



Business 



RMI 2786 THE LEGAL ENVIRONMENT OF INSURANCE 

This course will be based on general business law, particularly the areas of 
contract and agency law, and will emphasize the application of business law to 
insurance situations. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2787 MANAGEMENT — INSURANCE PERSONNEL 

This course will cover general management principles and will include an in- 
troduction to management information systems. 3-0-3* 

RMI 2800 ESTATE PLANNING AND TAXATION 

Estate and tax planning, emphasizing the nature, valuation disposition, ad- 
ministration, and taxation of property. The use of revocable and irrevocable 
trusts, testamentary trusts, life insurance, powers of appointment wills, lifetime 
gifts, and the marital deduction. Also, the role of life insurance in minimizing the 
financial problems of the estate owner. 3-0-3* 

Secretarial Studies 

The following course descriptions apply to those campuses which have the module lab 

approach: 

SES1108 TYPEWRITING 

All students taking typing will enroll in SES 1108, a three-hour course. This is a 
general typing class divided into nine modules — three modules each of 
beginning, intermediate, and advanced. As soon as the student completes the 
required assignments in the first module, he/she may take the tests over module 
A. If the student passes the tests, he/she will receive credit for Module A and 
move on to Module B. Students may progress from one module to the next as 
rapidly as they wish. Grade and one hour credit will be awarded for modules 
completed. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 1100 BEGINNING TYPEWRITING 

This course will cover Modules A, B, and C. In Module A, the student learns the 
keyboard. In Module B, the student learns vertical and horizontal centering, 
simple memoranda, personal and business letters. In Module C, the student 
learns to do tabulation, outlines, reports, and manuscripts with footnotes. 1-4-3* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 1110 INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING 

This course covers Modules D, E, and F. In Module D, the student learns to do 
AMS letters, business letters with special features, and inner office memoranda. 
In Module E, the student learns to do meeting agendas, news releases, meeting 
minutes, and tables with special features. In Module F, the student learns to do 
purchase orders, invoices, requisitions, bills of lading, reports, application 
letters, resumes, and financial statements. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 2120 ADVANCED TYPEWRITING 

(Prerequisite: SES 1110) This course covers Modules G, H, and I. In Module G, 
the student learns the IBM Memory typewriter. In Module H, the student com- 
pletes the Great Outdoors Practice Set, which is a job simulation. In Module I, 
the student learns to do legal office typing. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 



'Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

155 



Business 

The following course descriptions apply to those campuses which do not have the 

module lab approach: 

SES1108 TYPEWRITING 

Individualized instruction in a combined section of beginning, intermediate and 
advanced typewriting. The student will progress in the typing sequence that can 
be accomplished in the term. Three hours credit will be granted in SES 1 100, SES 
1 1 10 or SES 2120 upon successful completion of work assigned. 1-3-3* (offered 
Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 1100 BEGINNING TYPEWRITING 

This course is for students with no previous training in typewriting or for those 
whose performance is inadequate for the more advanced courses. 1-3-3* (of- 
fered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 1110 INTERMEDIATE TYPEWRITING 

(Prerequisite: SES 1 100 or equivalent) This course is a continuation of SES 1 100 
and offers a review of the basic skills. Emphasis is placed on production 
standards required in letter writing, manuscript, tabulation and business forms. 
1-3-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 1210 BEGINNING SHORTHAND 

(Co-requisite: SES 1100 or the successful completion ot a previous typing 
course) Basic principles of Century 21 Shorthand Theory and Practice (South- 
western) are studied. It is open to students without previous instruction in 
shorthand or with inadequate preparation for SES 1211. A dictation skill of 50 or 
more words a minute is developed. 1-4-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 1211 DICTATION AND TRANSCRIPTION 

(Prerequisites: SES 1210 or equivalent and SES 1100 or equivalent) This course 
is a continuation of SES 1210. A dictation skill of 80 or more words a minute is 
developed on new-matter dictation, and transcription for mailability is em- 
phasized. Gregg or Century 21 students who qualify may enroll in this class. 2-2- 
3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 1330 BUSINESS ENGLISH 

An intensive college course in grammar, with primary emphasis placed on 
sentence structure, punctuation, and capitalization. The main applications are 
on the problems of the dictator, the stenographer, and the typist. 3-0-3* (offered 
Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 1401 CLERICAL OFFICE PRACTICE 

(Co-requisite: SES 1110) A comprehensive study of clerical office procedures, 
such as filing, telephone techniques, duplication, simple payroll and banking 
transactions, as well as experience on selected office machines. 3-0-3* (offered 
Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 1402 SECRETARIAL OFFICE PROCEDURES 

(Prerequisites: SES 1401 and SES 1330) Co- or prerequisites: SES 2120) This is a 
finishing course for the secretarial student. It is designed for students who 
aspire to reach professional status as a secretary. It covers a wide range of 
office activities and provides training through simulated office situations. This 
course should be taken after Business Communications (SES 2335). 3-0 ; 3* 
(offered Winter term) 

SES 1949 CO-OP: OFFICE EDUCATION I 

This is a coordinated work-study program which reinforces the educational and 

professional growth of the student through parallel involvement in classroom 

studies and field experience in the student's chosen career. The student and 

teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the on-the-job office education 

assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher-coordinator and the 

immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3* 
156 



Business 

SES2120 ADVANCED TYPEWRITING 

(Prerequisite: SES 1110) This course offers a thorough review of problems in 
typing office forms, tabulated reports, manuscripts, and business letters, in- 
troduction is made to the typing of legal and medical forms and government and 
military letters. Improvement of production ability on all typing is stressed. 1-3- 
3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 2212 ADVANCED SHORTHAND DICTATION AND TRANSCRIPTION 

(Prerequisites: SES 1211 or equivalent and SES 1110 or equivalent) This course 
includes the general instruction offered for stenographic work. Through the use 
of live high-speed dictation and high-speed dictation tapes, a shorthand writing 
speed of 90 or more words a minute is developed. Gregg or Century 21 students 
who qualify may enroll in this class. 2-2-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 2221 MACHINE SHORTHAND I 

(Co-requisite: SES 1100 or SES 1110 or equivalent) All the basic theory of the 
machine shorthand system is studied. The stenograph machine is used. A 
dictation skill of 60 to 80 words aminute is developed. This course is open to all 
students interested in the secretarial field, especially those going into legal 
work. Previous shorthand is not needed. 1-4-3* 

SES 2222 MACHINE SHORTHAND II 

(Prerequisite: SES 2221) This course is a continuation of SES 2221, with em- 
phasis on skill building and its application to usable transcription. A dictation 
skill of 80 to 120 words a minute will be developed. 1-4-3* 

SES 2223 MACHINE SHORTHAND III 

(Prerequisite: SES 2221 and SES 2222 or equivalent) This course is a con- 
tinuation of SES 2222 with continued emphasis on skill building and specialized 
vocabulary. A dictation skill of 120 to 150 words a minute will be developed. 1-4- 
3* 

SES 2224 MACHINE SHORTHAND 

Individualized instruction in a combined section of beginning, intermediate, and 
advanced machine shorthand. The student will advance in the sequence that can 
be accomplished in the term. Machines are furnished for classroom instruction; 
however, it is advised that a machine be rented or purchased for home practice. 
A dictation skill of 60 words a minute is developed in the beginning section; 80 
words a minute in the intermediate section; 120 words a minute in the advanced 
section. Three credit hours will be granted in either SES 2221, SES 2222 or SES 
2223 upon successful completion of work assigned. 1-4-3* 

SES 2248 SPECIAL APPLICATIONS OF LEGAL-MEDICAL DICTATION AND 
TRANSCRIPTION 
(Prerequisites: SES 1110 and SES 1211 or equivalents) Dictation and tran- 
scription practice is given utilizing short cuts applicable to the special legal and 
medical fields. Legal and medical terminology are included. 2-2-3* 

SES 2335 BUSINESS COMMUNICATIONS 

(Prerequisite: SES 1330) The purpose of this course is to study correspondence 
of the business office. Much time will be spent in composing and analyzing 
various kinds of business letters and business reports. 3-0-3* 

SES 2361 MACHINE TRANSCRIPTION 

(Co- or prerequisite: Intermediate Typing SES 1110 and Business English SES 
1330) This course is designed to develop the student's proficiency in tran- 
scribing predictated new material into mailable copy. Several types of cassette 
transcribers are taught. 2-2-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

SES 2949 CO-OP: OFFICE EDUCATION II 

This course is a continuation of SES 1949. 1-10-3* 
* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 157 



Communications 



Communications 

FACULTY: Duncan (Chairperson), Adams, Betz, Bloodworth, 
Bosworth (Assistant Chairperson, Reading), Busselle, 
Connolly, Darcey, Dickinson, Easterling, Flory, W. 
Graham, Greene, Jones, Leahy, McCreight, Meyer, 
Musto, Perez, Piatt, Schneider, Sterling, Wilson, 
Witherspoon. PBJC North, Ferguson, Jefferson, Young. 
PBJC South, Collins, Kramer, Turk. PBJC Glades, Lucas, 
Russal 

MAJORS: Creative Writing, English, English Teacher, Foreign 
Languages, Foreign Language Teacher, Journalism, 
Liberal Arts, Public Relations, Speech-Drama, Speech 
Pathology and Audiology 

COURSE PREFIXES: AML, ENC, ENG, ENL, FRE, JOU, LIT, MMC, 

ORI, PHI, REA, RED, RTV, SPC, SPN, THE, TPA, TPP 
PROGRAMS: 

CREATIVE WRITING, ENGLISH, ENGLISH TEACHER (A.A. 05-101), LIBERAL ARTS 
(A. A. 05-105) 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences. 3 

POS 1001 * Introduction to Political Science 3 

Science 6 

MGF1113 General Education Math 1 3 

Literature 12 

HES 1000** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Foreign Languages (Spanish or French) 12 

Physical Education 2 

Electives*** '. 10 



62 



*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
** HES 2121 may be substituted. 
'* 'Suggested electives: PH1 1100, ORI 2000, ENC 2423. 



158 



Communications 

FOREIGN LANGUAGE (A.A. 05-201), FOREIGN LANGUAGE TEACHER (A.A. 05-202) 

Occupation aims of students specializing in Foreign Language are so varied that the 
faculty has found it advisable to arrange individual programs for each student instead 
of building a standard curriculum. Students expecting to complete a baccalaureate 
degree at a four-year college or university should study the Associate in Arts 
requirements and the requirements of the college where they intend to continue their 
education. 

EVALUATING PREVIOUS STUDY: 

The general evaluation of high school or preparatory school foreign language study 
runs at a ratio of 2.1. For example, two years of Spanish in high school will be con- 
sidered the equivalent of one year in college. A student who has had 3 years of high 
school Spanish will be considered to have had the equivalent of 1 1 /2 years of college 
Spanish. However, to satisfy the requirements for graduation from Palm Beach Junior 
College, a student may register for any language course regardless of how many years 
of foreign language he has studied in high school. However, for evaluation and ac- 
creditation of his language credits upon entering the university, he will be requested to 
compensate in some field for every hour of language credit he has repeated or 
duplicated at Palm Beach Junior College. These compensated credits must be ob- 
tained at Palm Beach Junior College or at the university. 

JOURNALISM (A.A. 05-104), PUBLIC RELATIONS (A.A. 05-107) 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE , HOURS CREDIT 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

Science 6 

MGF 1113 General Education Math I 3 

- Physical Education 2 

HES 1000* * Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Literature 6 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL1011 Music Appreciation (3) 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

SPC1601 Public Speaking 3 

JOU1100 Basic Writing for Mass Communications 3 

MMC 1000 Survey of Communications 3 

JOU2103 Reporting or Writing Techniques 3 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

Electives . : 10 

62 
•POS2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
** HES 2121 may be substituted. 



159 



Communications 

SPEECH - DRAMA (A.A. 05-103) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Science 6 

ENC1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

Voice Class 1 

DAA 2160 Interpretive Movement 1 

DAA 2161 Advanced Interpretive Movement 1 

THE 1000 Introduction to the Theater 3 

THE 1020 Techniques of Dramatic Art 3 

TPA 1210 Fundamentals of Stagecraft 3 

TPA 1211 Advanced Stagecraft 3 

30 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3" 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

Literature 6 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MGF1113 General Education Math I 3 

PSY2012 General Psychology 3 

SPC 1601 Public Speaking 3 

ORI 2000 Oral Interpretation 3 

TPP2100 Acting 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS 1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 



32 
* HES 2121 may be substituted. 
* * POS 2041 or AM H 201 may be substituted. 

SPEECH PATHOLOGY AND AUDIOLOGY (A.A. 05-109) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

Physical Education 2 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

Science 6 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS 1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

Elective 4 



33 
*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

160 



Communications 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

APB1190 Anatomy and Physiology 1 2 

APB1190L Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory 1 

APB 1 191 Anatomy and Physiology II 2 

APB1191L Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory 1 

Literature 3 

HES 1000** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MGF1113 General Education Math I 3 

DEP 2102 Child Growth and Development 3 

SPC1601 Public Speaking 3 

Electives 9 

29 

**HES 2121 may be substituted. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

American Literature 

AML 2020 AMERICAN LITERATURE TO 1865 

(Prerequisite: ENC 1 136 or equivalent) This course is a study of the development 
of our national literature from colonial times to the end of the Civil War. 3-0-3* 
(offered all terms) 
AML 2022 AMERICAN LITERATURE AFTER 1865 

(Prerequisite: ENC 1136 or equivalent) The study of the rise of modern American 
literature is provided in this course. Current literary trends and contemporary 
American writers are stressed. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

English Composition 

ENC 1 103 FRESHMAN COMMUNICATIONS I 

SECTIONS 1-49 

This is primarily a skills course which aims to develop proficiency in all aspects 
of communications, but strongly emphasizes writing and reading. An un- 
derstanding of how language is actually used is necessary as a basis for any real 
understanding of the problems encountered in effective communication. The 
important skills of listening, speaking, reading, and writing can then be dealt 
with in detail, with the main concern being with factual matters. 3-0-3* 

SECTIONS 50-59 

(Co-requisite REA 1105) Reading Emphasis: The content of this course is 
essentially the same as ENC 1103, Sections 1-49, except this course is an em- 
phasis section designed specifically to provide assistance for those students 
whose placement test scores in reading or in both reading and writing indicate a 
need for special help. Students passing this course go into ENC 1136, Sections 
50-59. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

SECTIONS 60-69 

Writing Emphasis: This course is essentially the same as ENC 1103, Sections 1- 
49 except this course is an emphasis section designed specifically to provide 
assistance in writing for those students whose scores on the writing placement 
test indicate a need for special help. Students passing this course go into ENC 
1136, Sections 60-69. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

SECTIONS 80-89 

Advanced Freshman Communications: The aims of this course are basically the 
same as those of ENC 1103, Sections 1-49 except that emphasis is given to the 
study, technique, and practice of creative expression. Students who score in the 
upper 15 percentile on the reading and writing placement tests are enrolled in 
these advanced sections. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 161 



Communications 

ENC1136 FRESHMAN COMMUNICATIONS II 
SECTIONS 1-49 

(Prerequisite: ENC 1 103 or equivalent) This course consists of three units which 
introduce the students to the role of language in thought and action: (1) 
Language and Thought, (2) Persuasion (argument and logic), and (3) Mass Media 
of Communication. The concern here is with the development of student ability 
to read critically and to write effectively. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 
Research paper techniques are taught in both ENC 1 103 and ENC 1 136. 

SECTIONS 50-59 

(Prerequisites: ENC 1103, Sections 50-59) This course is a continuation of ENC 
1103, Sections 50-59, and is basically the same as other sections of ENC 1136, 
except that it provides emphasis for those students who need continuing 
special help in writing and reading. Sections 50-59 have REA 1106 as a co- 
requisite. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

SECTIONS 80-89 (ADVANCED COURSE FOR ENC 1136) 

(Prerequisites: ENC 1103, Sections 80-89, Advanced Freshman Communications 
or equivalent) This course is a continuation of ENC 1 103, Sections 80-89, and is 
basically the same as other sections of ENC 1 136, except that emphasis is given 
to creative expression. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ENC 1313 TECHNICAL WRITING 

(Prerequisite: ENC 1103 or equivalent) Technical writing offers critical work in 
preparation of manuals, reports, and professional memoranda. It is designed for 
those who need to write out processes and instructions. Practical examples, 
such as handbooks and letters from functioning businesses, help students 
develop skill in being explicit. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

ENC 2423 ADVANCED COMPOSITION 

(Prerequisite: ENC 1 136 or equivalent or permission of Department Chairperson) 
This is a course in writing which emphasizes style and styles of writing. The 
work includes analysis of a wide range of literary types and concrete instruction 
in effective devices. The writing assignments are structured to help the student 
control and develop his own style. To that end he writes upon assignment both 
original and imitative pieces. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

English — General 

ENG 2910 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH MATERIALS I 

(Prerequisite: Permission of Director of Learning Resources Center) This course 
comprises the first 16 units of a directed individual study and will include taped 
lectures; self-tests; written, guided library studies; and formal examinations. 
The course material presents basic information sources 1 credit hour (offered all 
terms) 

ENG 291 1 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH MATERIALS II 

(Prerequisite: Permission of Director of Learning Resources Center and suc- 
cessful completion of ENG 2910) This course comprises the second 16 units of a 
directed individual study and will include taped lectures; self-tests; written, 
guided library studies; and formal examinations. The course material presents 
advanced information sources. 1 credit hour (offered all terms) 

ENG 291 2 INTRODUCTION TO RESEARCH MATERIALS III 

(Prerequisite: Permission of Director of Learning Resources Center and suc- 
cessful completion of ENG 2911) This course comprises the third 16 units of a 
directed individual study and will include taped lectures; self-tests; written 
guided library studies; and formal examinations. The course material presents a 
comprehensive overview of information sources. 1 credit hour (offered all terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

162 



Communications 

English Literature 

ENL2015 ENGLISH LITERATURE TO 1660 

(Prerequisite: ENC 1136 or equivalent) This course is a study of significant 
writing produced in the British Isles from the time of the Anglo-Saxons to 1660. 
3-0-3* (offered all terms) 
ENL 2020 ENGLISH LITERATURE AFTER 1660 

(Prerequisite: ENC 1136 or equivalent) This course is a study of significant 
writings produced in the British Isles from 1660 to the present. 3-0-3* (offered 
Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

French Language 

FRE1100 ELEMENTARY FRENCH I 

A basic knowledge of French gammar and composition, reasonable pronun- 
ciation, and familiarity with the life and culture of native speakers of the 
language is provided in this course. Each student is required to spend one hour 
per week listening to laboratory language recordings in the Audio-Lingual 
Department of the Library Learning Resources Center. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & 
Winter terms) 

FRE1101 ELEMENTARY FRENCH II 

(Prerequisite: FRE 1 100 or equivalent) This course is a continuation of FRE 1 100. 
It continues the study of basic grammar, composition, and pronunciation. Each 
student is required to spend one hour per week listening to laboratory language 
recordings in the Audio-Lingual Department of the Library Learning Resources 
Center. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

FRE 2200 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH I 

(Prerequisite: FRE 1101 or equivalent) This course presents a rapid grammar 
review followed by translation of contemporary French stories and an in- 
troduction to French civilization. Vocabulary building is emphasized along with 
practice in written exercises and conversation. The language laboratory is 
optional for intermediate students. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

FRE 2201 INTERMEDIATE FRENCH II 

(Prerequisite: FRE 2200 or equivalent) This is a continuation of FRE 2200 and 
places emphasis upon the translation of French stories, written themes, and 
conversation. Discussions and exercises on the French nation and its culture 
are also given special importance. The language laboratory is optional for 
students. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

Journalism 

JOU 1100 BASIC WRITING FOR MASS COMMUNICATIONS 

This is a course in the fundamentals of news evaluation, news gathering, and 
news writing. Basic instruction in lead writing, organizing of stories, avoiding 
libel, and ethics in reporting and writing are stressed. Required for journalism 
majors. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 
JOU 2103 REPORTING AND WRITING TECHNIQUES 

(Prerequisite: JOU 1100 or equivalent or permission of Department Chairperson) 
This course places special emphasis on techniques of writing specific tyles of 
articles, including news, features, sports, and editorials. 3-0-3* (offered Winter 
term) 

Literature 

LIT 2215 WORLD LITERATURE TO 1600 

(Prerequisite: ENC 1136 or equivalent) A study of selected works of the ancient, 
medieval, and renaissance worlds. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 
* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

163 



Communications 

LIT 2224 WORLD LITERATURE AFTER 1600 

This course is a study of selected world masterpieces from approximately 1600 
to the present day. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

Mass Media Communications 

MMC1000 SURVEY OF COMMUNICATIONS 

This course surveys the development of communications media including a 
study of present problems facing the press. Special emphasis is placed on 
newspapers, radio, and television, their requirements and opportunities, and 
their responsibilities to the public. Required for journalism majors. 3-0-3* (of- 
fered Winter term) 
RTV 2000 FUNDAMENTALS OF TELEVISION PRODUCTION 

Principles of television studio practice and successful programming. In- 
struction and demonstrations in the basic skills and performance techniques for 
television. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

Oral Interpretation 

ORI2000 ORAL INTERPRETATION 

This course emphasizes the basic principles of oral interpretation as applied to 
the interpretation of prose drama and poetry. Primarily it strives to teach the art 
of communicating to an audience works of literary art in their intellectual, 
emotional and aesthetic entirety. Using classical and contemporary literature, 
students learn how to select, evaluate, analyze, prepare and present material. 
Reader's Theater as well as individual interpretation is studied. Recitals to 
which other students and guests may be invited are an important part of this 
course. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

Philosophy 

PH1 1000 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (Taught in Social Science Department) 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the nature of philosophy, 
its methods and some of the major problems with which it has been concerned 
from the pre-Socratic era to the present. Special attention is given to the source 
of ideas and their relationship to science, art, religion and socio-political 
developments, (offered Fall & Winter terms) 3-0-3* 

PH1 1100 THE ART OF THINKING (Taught in Communications Department) 

The principle objects of this course are to help the student think with more 
accuracy, clarity and completeness, and to help him apply his knowledge in 
analyzing the thinking of others as expressed in speech and print. 3-0-3* (offered 
Fall & Winter terms) 
PH1 1600 ETHICS (Taught in Social Science Department) 

This course involves a rigorous and systematic inquiry into man's moral 
behavior with the purpose of discovering the rules that ought to govern human 
action and the goals that are worth seeking in human life, using Ethics as a 
science of conduct. 3-0-3* 

Reading 

REA 1 105 READING IMPROVEMENT I 

(Co-requisite: ENC 1103 — Sections 50-59) This reading course is designed for 
students who need to improve their reading habits and skilfs. Personalized in- 
struction in vocabulary improvement, study skills, essentials of comprehension 
and rate of comprehension are emphasized. The student uses a variety of 
materials as he participates in group activities and in the individualized reading 
laboratory program. 3-0-3* (offered Fall and Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
164 



Communications 

REA1106 READING IMPROVEMENT II 

(Co-requisite: ENC 1136 — Sections 50-59) This course is a continuation of REA 
1105. It is a developmental reading course in which the student participates in 
group and individual activities designed to increase his reading ability in the 
areas of his special need. Areas emphasized include: vocabulary, com- 
prehension, rate of comprehension, and study skills. 3-0-3* (offered Fall and 
Winter terms) 

Reading Education 

RED 1219 PHONICS FOR TEACHERS 

This course is designed to develop the phonics skills needed as a basis for the 
teaching of reading. Phoneme-grapheme (sound-symbol) relationships will be 
emphasized. The use of structural analysis and/or context clues in combination 
with a phonetic attack in word-recognition will also be investigated. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

Speech Communication 

SPC1600 FUNDAMENTALS OF SPEECH 

This course aims to train the student in the basic principles and techniques 
involved in effective speaking communication. The student develops poise and 
confidence through constant practice in presenting various materials via many 
speech communication experiences. The emphasis also lies on individual 
development and improvement. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

SPC 1601 PUBLIC SPEAKING 

(Prerequisite: SPC 1600 or equivalent or permission of the Department Chair- 
person) This course is designed primarily for those interested in a more serious 
and intensive study of public speaking. It aims to review briefly the principles of 
speech preparation, organization, and delivery and to afford, in the main, ex- 
tensive practice in the more specialized types of speech communication ex- 
periences most common to those who frequently are called upon to give 
speeches in public. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

SPC 2520 DISCUSSION AND DEBATE 

The function of group discussion and debate in a democratic society. Methods 
of argumentation, including case preparation, briefing, research, refutation and 
logical elements of persuasion. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

Spanish Language 

SPN1100 ELEMENTARY SPANISH I 

A basic knowledge of Spanish grammar and composition, reasonable 
pronunciation, and familiarity with the life and cultures of native speakers of the 
language is provided in this course. Each student is required to spend one hour 
per week listening to laboratory language recordings in the Audio-Lingual 
Department of the Library Learning Resources Center. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

SPN 1101 ELEMENTARY SPANISH II 

(Prerequfsite: SPN 1100 or equivalent) The course is a continuation of SPN 1100. 
The objectives are to continue the study of basic grammar, composition and 
pronunciation. Course materials contain information about the life and culture 
of native speakers of the language. Each student is required to spend one hour 
per week listening to laboratory language recordings in the Audio-Lingual 
Department of the Library Learning Resources Center. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

SPN 2200 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH I 

(Prerequisite: SPN 1101 or equivalent) Objectives of this course are an enlarged 
comprehension of grammar and composition, continued attention to pronun- 
ciation, and further study of the life and culture of native speakers of the 
language through reading and discussions of selected literary works. The 
language laboratory is optional. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 16 g 



Communications 

SPN 2201 INTERMEDIATE SPANISH II 

(Prerequisite: SPN 2200 or equivalent) The course is a continuation of SPN 2200. 
The objectives are to further the study of advanced grammar and composition 
and to enhance the appreciation of the life and culture of native speakers of the 
language. The language laboratory is optional. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

Theater 

THE 1000 INTRODUCTION TO THE THEATER 

This course presents a general approach to the organization to the theater 
especially designed to develop the student's knowledge and appreciation of the 
theater arts through an historic and contemporary study of the drama. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall term) 

THE 1020 TECHNIQUES OF DRAMATIC ART 

This course is a study of the theater showing the relationships of the various 
elements in the production of a play. It stresses both the aesthetic and practical 
place and function of the playwright, director, designer, technician and actor. 3- 
0-3* (offered Winter term) 

THE 1925 PLAY PRODUCTION 

Based upon lectures given in class, the aim of this course is to give students 
actual practical experience in producing a play. It stresses utilization of the 
associated arts and skills of technical directing, stage design, lighting, costume 
design, theater management, etc., in actual production. 2-2-3* (offered Winter 
term) 

THE 1949 COOP: THEATER I 

Co-Op Education in Theater is a coordinated work-study program which rein- 
forces the educational and professional growth of the student through parallel 
involvement in classroom studies and field experience in the student's chosen 
career. The student and teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the on- 
the-job theater assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teacher- 
coordinator and the immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3* 

THE 2721 SURVEY OF CHILDREN'S THEATER 

The aid of this course is to analyze the theory of children's theater, to survey its 
development within the American theatrical scene, to study its function within 
the American community, and to persue materials available for use with and for 
children. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

THE 2949 CO-OP: THEATER II 

This course is a continuation of THE 1949. 1-10-3* 

TPA1210 FUNDAMENTALS OF STAGECRAFT 

This course presents lectures and classroom demonstrations in the con- 
struction, painting and handling of scenery, makeup, and the making of 
properties. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

TPA 121 1 ADVANCED STAGECRAFT 

This course is a continuation of TPA 1210 with special emphasis on set design 
and lighting techniques. The student studies the principles of designing and 
executing model sets along with the principles of stage lighting in classroom 
demonstrations and experiences. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

Theater Performance and Performance Training 
TPP2100 ACTING 

(Prerequisite: THE 1025 or special permission of Department Chairperson) A 
study of the fundamental principles and techniques of acting. Training in 
pantomime, stage movement, characterization and motivation is given. Students 
will present scenes from plays as classroom exercises. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

166 



Criminal Justice 




Criminal Justice 



FACULTY: Macy (Chairperson), Dooies, Shackelford 
MAJORS: Law Enforcement, Corrections 
BOURSE PREFIXES: CCJ, CJT 



The transformation of the United States from a rural to an urban 
society, the tremendous social problems resulting from herding 
people together in vast areas around urban centers, the rapid ac- 
celeration of the drive for equality, the breakdown of many of our 
institutions, which have heretofore maintained social stability, pose 
problems for criminal justice personnel which are greater in both 
magnitude and complexity than those which they have faced before. 

The degree programs emphasizing law enforcement and corrections 
are focused upon the need for a broad background of educational 
experience. They are designed to provide personnel with the 
knowledge and understanding necessary to operate effectively in the 
highly complex field of social control. A number of related Law 
Enforcement, Corrections, and Criminal Justice career fields are 
open to the graduate of the types of police and corrections programs 
listed below. There is no discrimination on the ground of race, color, 
sex, religion or national origin. 

167 



Criminal Justice 

CRIMINAL JUSTICE (19-424) LAW ENFORCEMENT/CORRECTIONS 

This course of study is open to both men and women students and provides a modern 
approach to the field of Criminal Justice, with specialized study in Law Enforcement 
and/or Corrections including relations with the police, courts, and correctional 
agencies in the total administration of Criminal Justice. The program is designed to 
provide personnel with the knowledge and understanding necessary to operate ef- 
fectively in the complex field of social control. The program as recommended leads to 
graduations with an Associate in Science degree in Criminal Justice, (general 
education requirements met) which will enable a student to transfer to a senior 
university in the Florida University System in order to obtain a Baccalaureate degree. 

Students who do not wish to matriculate at a senior university may elect to satisfy A.S. 
degree requirements without general education requirements. This program is 
described under "Graduation Requirements for A.S. degree" located elsewhere in this 
catalog. 

SEMESTER 
COURSE HOURS CREDIT 

Communications: ENC 1103, ENC 1136 6 

Mathematics: MGF 1113 or higher math 3 

Science: Biology, Conservation, Physical Science, 

Chemistry =- 6 

Humanities: Literature 3 

ARH 1000 or MUL 1011 3 

Social Science: SOC 1200, POS 1001 or 

POS 2041 or AM H 2010 6 

Physical Education: (Exceptions: adults over 35, veterans, 

evening students) 2 

Health: 2 

Electives: 10 

Criminal Justice: : - 21 

62 
NOTE: Students desiring to continue their college education at a senior university 
must complete at least 36 hours of general education subjects. Any substitution of 
courses for the Law Enforcement degree program must be approved by the depart- 
ment chairperson. A minimum of 21 hours in any of the criminal justice courses listed 
below must be completed to earn the A.S. degree in Criminal Justice. 
LAW ENFORCEMENT - Criminal Justice Courses 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

CCJ 1020 Administration of Criminal Justice 3 

CCJ 1100 Introduction to Law Enforcement 3 

CCJ 1300 Introduction to Corrections 3 

CCJ 1410 Police Administration I 3 

CCJ 1420 Police Administration II 3 

CCJ 2210 Criminal Law 3 

CCJ 2230 Laws of Evidence 3 

CCJ 2270 Laws of Arrest, Search, and Seizure 3 

CCJ 2310 Organization and Admin, of Correctional fac 3 

CCJ 2330 Probation and Parole 3 

CCJ 2450 Management Supervision in the Criminal Justice 

Field 3 

168 



Criminal Justice 



CCJ 2500 Juvenile Delinquency 3 

CCJ 1949/ CO-OP Criminal Justice 4 

CJT 2100 Criminal Investigation 3 

CJT 2140 Introduction to Criminalistics 3 

Recommended Electives 

ECO 2013 Principles of Economics I 3 

HES1400 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 1 

AMH2010 United States History to 1865 3 

AMH 2020 United States History from 1865 3 

PH1 1100 The Art of Thinking 3 

POS 2041 American National Government 3 

POS2112 State and Local Government 3 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

EGC 2120 Personality Development 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

ANT 2000 Introduction to Anthropology 3 

SOC 2000 Introduction to Sociology 3 

SOC 2020 American Social Problems 3' 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

CCJ 1020 ADMINISTRATION OF CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

An overview of the total system of the administration of justice provided with 
emphasis on due process, justice and on the Constitutional guarantees and the 
civil rights of citizens and prisoners at various levels. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & 
Winter terms) 

CCJ 1100 INTRODUCTION TO LAW ENFORCEMENT AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

This course introduces the student to the field of law enforcement, covering 
philosophical background, history, constitutional limits, agencies, processes of 
justice, and evaluation of specific law enforcement practices today. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

CCJ 1300 INTRODUCTION TO CORRECTIONS 

An examination of the total correctional process from law enforcement through 
the administration of justice, probation, prisons, and correctional institutions, 
and parole. History and philosophy of correctional practice is surveyed. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall term) 

CCJ 1410 POLICE ADMINISTRATION I 

This course stresses the administrative activity of a modern police department. 
Special attention is given administration, records, auxiliary services, recruit- 
ment, supervision, personnel evaluation, discipline, planning and training. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall term) 

CCJ 1420 POLICE ADMINISTRATION II 

The concern in this course is with the efficient operations of a modern police 
department. Particular emphasis is placed on that phase of police operations 
which are usually seen by the general public, including the patrol, traffic, 
juvenile, vice and detective divisions. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

CCJ 1949 CO-OP CRIMINAL JUSTICE (Fall term) 
(See CO-OP elsewhere in this catalog.) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours -<- 

169 



Criminal Justice 

CCJ2949 CO-OP CRIMINAL JUSTICE (Winter Term) 

(Prerequisite: Sophomore students or others, as determined at the discretion of 
the department chairperson, based upon course work or experience) This course 
examines in detail the functions and operations of local criminal justice 
agencies. Placements are available with police, courts, and correctional 
agencies. 

Students electing the police concentration will observe individuals involved in 
the Criminal Justice System and related security programs whose missions are 
to reduce crime, protect and secure the citizenry, and provide security and loss 
prevention. Students will experience and observe activities at various local 
agencies, to include functions of law enforcement, detention, security and loss 
prevention, administrative and court procedures. 

Students electing the court concentration will have field experiences with the 
juvenile or adult court systems in Palm Beach County. Experiences may be 
either with the prosecution or defense and will include court procedures and 
practices as well as relationships with other Criminal Justice agencies. 

Students electing the Corrections concentration will examine in detail the 
Criminal Justice System and/or community-based programs before, during, and 
after incarceration of either juvenile or adult offenders. Students will observe 
individuals involved in intensive, reality-oriented, responsibility-bound treat- 
ment programs geared toward helping offenders lead more socially acceptable 
and responsible lives. Students will experience and observe activities at various 
treatment centers, detailed functions of both Intake Process and Probation, 
Aftercare procedures, Juvenile and/or Adult Court. 

Students will be assigned to different agencies for on-the-job experiences with 
supervisors. Participants will be assigned, supervised and evaluated by the 
instructor and agency personnel. 1-9-4* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

CCJ 2210 CRIMINAL LAW 

A study of the scope, purpose, definition, and classification of crimes. Con- 
sideration is given to criminal intent acts of omission and commission, offenses 
against the person and property. The elements of some of the more common 
offenses are studied in depth. Defenses to criminal acts are also treated. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall term) 

CCJ 2230 LAWS OF EVIDENCE 

This course is oriented toward kinds of evidence and rules governing the ad- 
missability of evidence to court and is a continuation of the study of the criminal 
justice system in the United States. Emphasis is also given to Florida laws of 
evidence and their application to proper law enforcement. 3-0-3* (offered Fall 
term) 

CCJ 2270 LAW OF ARREST, SEARCH, AND SEIZURE 

Peace officers' right and duty to make arrest. Obligations imposed by oath of 
officer. Distinction between felony and misdemeanor. Requisites of legal arrest 
as set forth in the Florida Penal Code. Immunity from arrest, legal rights of 
suspect, techniques and procedures in effecting arrests. Legal use of force, 
degree of force, rights of arrested persons. Attitude and remarks of arresting 
officer. Laws and regulations pertaining to search of premises, automobiles, 
and persons. Discussions relative to officer's right to search and hold for 
evidence or confiscate property. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

170 



Criminal Justice 

CCJ2310 ORGANIZATION AND ADMINISTRATION OF CORRECTIONAL 
FACILITIES 

The organizations of various institutions are studied. Treatment, custody and 
support activities are examined as entities and in relation to each other. 
Custodial, classification, reception and orientation and release procedures are 
reviewed. This course includes planning programs for specialized behavioral 
problems among inmates. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

CCJ 2330 PRINCIPLES OF PROBATION AND PAROLE 

The procedures associated with community-based treatment programs before 
and after incarceration will be examined in detail. Sentencing patterns, 
problems, and procedures along with the administrative policies will be em- 
phasized so that a more thorough understanding of the process will be acquired. 
Proper procedures in the supervision of probationers and parolees with a major 
impact on individual treatment and counseling methods in order to insure 
maximum societal gains will also be explored. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

CCJ 2450 MANAGEMENT AND SUPERVISION IN THE CRIMINAL JUSTICE FIELD 
Principles of management and methods of supervision and evaluation are 
surveyed. Topics such as leadership, motivation, communications, incentives, 
discipline and morale are studied. 3-0-3* (offered Winter & Spring terms) 

CCJ 2500 JUVENILE DELINQUENCY 

An introduction to the causes and treatment of juvenile delinquency. The 
organization, functions, and jurisdiction of juvenile agencies; the processing 
and detention of juveniles; juvenile case disposition, juvenile status and court 
procedures. Evaluation of methods in delinquency control and special attention 
given to forms of family, church and community resources bearing on juvenile 
adjustment and preventive measures. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

2CJ2905 ISSUES IN CRIMINAL JUSTICE 

This course is designed to allow the student to pursue an individually selected 
issue in our contemporary criminal justice system. Thorough in-depth in- 
vestigation of this issue will be through class discussions and practical field 
visits and research to appropriate South Florida criminal justice agencies 
(police, courts, corrections, probation, parole, juvenile delinquency). Skills 
developed by use of this method will be a deeper and more meaningful un- 
derstanding of the interrelationships among all segments of our criminal justice 
system. 3-0-3* (offered Summer term) 

CJT2100 CRIMINAL INVESTIGATION 

A general survey of methods and techniques used by modern law enforcement 
officers in the investigation of crime. Interrogation techniques, evidence, how to 
mark, preservation — after discovery, fingerprints, tool marks, firearms iden- 
tification, homicide, burglary, robbery, and other crime scene investigations. 
Narcotics investigation, laboratory analysis of evidence, courtroom techniques 
and demeanor. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

CJT 2140 INTRODUCTION TO CRIMINALISTICS 

(Co- or prerequisite: CJT 2100 or CCJ 2230) A course designed to familiarize the 
student with the capabilities of the modern crime laboratory and its contribution 
to the criminal justice system. Selected laboratory experiments, scientific 
analysis, comparison procedures, and identification processes of physical 
evidence such as tool markings, blood, hairs, fibers, drugs, chemicals, 
photographs, firearms, and ballistic examinations will be accomplished. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

171 



Dental Health Services 

Dental Health Services 

FACULTY: Hutchins (Chairperson), Benedict, Ellis, Gerstein, 
Krumm, MacPherson (Assistant Chairperson), Pier- 
mattei, Shapins, Smythe, Toomath, Whitehead 

MAJORS: Dental Hygiene, Dental Laboratory Technology, Dental 
Assisting 

COURSE PREFIXES: DEA, DEH, DES, DTE 

PROGRAMS: 

DENTAL HYGIENE (A.S. 07-151) 

Program is accredited by the Council on Dental Education of the American Dental 
Association and is approved by the Florida State Board of Dental Examiners. Please 
refer to Admission Requirements. 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEMESTER 

HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE Fall Winter Spring 

APB1190 Anatomy & Physiology I 2 

APB1190L Anatomy & Physiology I Lab 1 

APB 1 191 Anatomy & Physiology II 2 

APB1191L Anatomy & Physiology II Lab 1 

DEH 1410 General & Oral Histology/Pathology 3 

DEH 1800 Clinical Dental Hygiene 1 3 

DEH 1800L Clinical Dental Hygiene I Lab 5 

DEH 1802C Clinical Dental Hygiene II 5 

DES 1000 Dental Anatomy 2 

DES1200C Dental Radiology 2 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

MCB 1000 Microbiology 2 

MCB 1000L Microbiology Laboratory 1 

Physical Education 1 1 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

15 18 7 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

DEH 1303 Pharmacology 1 

DEH 2600 Periodontics 1 

DEH 2702C Community & Private Preventive Dentistry 2 

DEH2806C Clinical Dental Hygiene III 6 

DEH 2808C Clinical Dental Hygiene IV 5 

DES 1100 Elements of Dental Materials 2 

DES 1100L Elements of Dental Materials Laboratory . 1 

HUN 1012 Nutrition for Dental Health Services 3 

POS1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to Social Sciences 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

16 14 
*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

Admission Prerequisite: A transcript documenting that the student has taken a unit of 
high school chemistry or PBJC's CHM 1015, or its equivalent, within the past five years 
with an earned grade of "C" or better 

172 



Dental Health Services 




DENTAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 07-152) 

This two-year curriculum includes all the areas of instruction as defined by the Council 
on Education of the American Dental Association. It is designed to conform to the 
policies and regulations of the Florida State Dental Society. This program is ac- 
credited by the Council on Dental Education of the American Dental Association. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



COURSE 

DES1000 

DES1000L 

DES1100 

DTE 1000 

DTE1100C 

ENC1103 

PSC1341 

DTE1101C 

DTE1110C 

DTE1120C 

ENC1136 

HES1000* 

DTE2121C 
DTE2131C 



DTE1150C 
DTE2130C 
MAN 1700* 1 
POS1001** 

DTE 1 HOC 
DTE 1200 
DTE2151C 



TITLE 

Dental Anatomy 

Dental Anatomy Laboratory 

Elements of Dental Materials 

Orientation & Terminology 

Complete Denture Techniques I 

Freshman Communications I 

Survey of Physical Science II 

Complete Denture Techniques II 

Cast Inlay & Crown Techniques 

Partial Denture Techniques I 

Freshman Communications II 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 

Physical Education 

Partial Denture Techniques II 

Ortho & Pedo Removable Appliances . . . 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Crown & Bridge Techniques I 

Special Prosthesis 

Introduction to Business 

Introduction to Political Science 

Physical Education 

Ceramics 

Jurisprudence & Ethics 

Crown & Bridge Techniques II 



SEMESTER 

HOURS CREDIT 

Fall Winter Spring 

2 
1 
2 
1 
4 
3 
3 

5 

2 

2 

3 

2 

1 

4 
2 



16 

5 
2 
3 
3 
1 



15 



14 



12 



'HES2121 may be substituted 

'MAN 2800 may be substituted. 

'AMH 2010 or POS 2041 may be substituted. 



173 



Dental Health Services 

DENTAL ASSISTING PROGRAM (Certificate Program CT-1 53) 

This course begins with the Spring II Term and covers a period of two terms plus both 
the Spring and Summer terms. It is accredited by the American Dental Association 
Council on Dental Education. In order to utilize the forty-week period in special 
studies, typewriting is not included in the curriculum but is a co-requisite to the course 
and proficiency is required for graduation. 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE 

Summer Fall Winter Sprii 
DEA 1010 Introduction to Dental Assisting ... 1 

DEA 1020 Preclinical Orientation I 3 

DEA 1120 Related Dental Theory 3 

DEA 1200 Dental Office Practice Mgmt 3 

DEA1820C Intraoral Auxiliary Procedures I 3 

DEA1821C Intraoral Auxiliary Procedures II .. . 2 

DEA 1800C Clinical Practice I 4 

DEA1801C Clinical Practice II 4 

DEA 1802C Clinical Practice III 6 

DEA 2940 Dental Practicum 1 

DES1000C Dental Anatomy 3 

DES 1 100 Elements of Dental Materials 2 

DES 1 1 0OL Elements of Dental Materials Lab. . . 1 

DES 1200C Dental Radiology 2 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications 1 3 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

6 17 18 6 




174 



Dental Health Services 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Dental Assisting 

DEA 1010 INTRODUCTION TO DENTAL ASSISTING 

This course presents, through lecture and student participation, the goals, 
objectives, ethics, terminology, legal responsibilities, areas of service, and 
career opportunities of the dental assistant. It identifies the professional 
organizations and resources available to the dental assistant. 1-0-1* (offered 
Summer term) 

DEA1020C PRECLINICAL ORIENTATION 

This course presents lecture and practical experience in the identification of 
instruments, equipment and materials commonly used in the dental en- 
vironment. Students will participate in sterilizing procedures for instruments, 
care and maintenance of equipment, taking and recording patient information. 2- 
3-3* (offered Summer term) 

DEA 1120 RELATED DENTAL THEORY 

This course is designed for familiarization of common drugs and medicaments; 
pharmacological properties, therapeutic applications and any toxicities; also a 
knowledge of nutrition with emphasis on relationship to oral health. Aspects of 
general oral pathology are covered in this course. In addition, recognition of 
dental emergencies and procedures to follow pertaining thereto. 3-0-3* (offered 
Fall term) 

DEA 1200 DENTAL OFFICE PRACTICE MANAGEMENT 

Study of the methods by which the dental office/dental clinic are administered. 
Areas of study relevant to the responsibilities of the dental assistant will in- 
clude: human relationships and interaction, patient psychology; record keeping, 
i.e., daily records, appointments, collections, billing, income and social security 
taxes, recall systems, third party payment forms, office and dental supplies 
inventory; office housekeeping and maintenance. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

DEA1800C CLINICAL PRACTICE I 

The dental assistant student will participate in clinical experience involving 
patients and dentists performing all functions required of a dental assistant in 
office/clinic setting. Student will have additional assignment responsibilities in 
areas of radiology, team leadership, sterilization, clinical observation, patient 
reception and office observation. Lecture hours are utilized to present advanced 
theory. 2-6-4* (offered Fall term) 

DEA1801C CLINICAL PRACTICE II 

Continuation of DEA 1800C. 2-6-4* (offered Winter term) 

DEA 1802 CLINICAL PRACTICE III 

Continuation of DEA 1800C and also includes a supervised externship program 
utilizing the private dental office, experience and lecture. 2-12-6* (offered Spring 
term) 

DEA 1820C INTRAORAL AUXILIARY PROCEDURES I 

Introductory course designed to offer student participation in specified intraoral 
procedures. 2-3-3* (offered Fall term) 

DEA 1821C INTRAORAL AUXILIARY PROCEDURES II 

Continuation of DEA 1820C. 1-3-2* (offered Winter term) 

DEA 2940 DENTAL PRACTICUM 

The objective of this course is to provide practical experience in patient 
preparation for oral diagnosis. Students will have assigned responsibilities in 
areas of patient recognition, charting, study models and radiology. 0-2-1* (of- 
fered Fall term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

175 



Dental Health Services 

YOUR 



'GIO 

TICKEJ5 

MFRfl 




Dental Hygiene 

DEH1303 PHARMACOLOGY 

The objectives of this course is to familiarize hygiene students with the basic 
aspects relating to the physical and chemical properties, dosage, methods of 
administration, and therapeutic use of pharmaceutic preparations used in 
dentistry. 1-0-1 * (offered Fall term) 

DEH 1410 GENERAL AND ORAL HISTOLOGY/PATHOLOGY 

This course deals with the normal microscopic structure and morphology of the 
tissues of the body with emphasis on the teeth and supporting structures. It 
deals with the early embryonic development of the structures of the head and 
neck. Related to this, the course will cover the general pathology of common 
diseases and the specific study of pathological conditions of the mouth, teeth 
and supporting structures and their relationship to systemic diseases. This 
course will not include indepth content in periodontology. 3-0-3* (offered Winter 
term) 

DEH 1800 CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE I 

(Co-requisite: DEH 1800L) This is a competency-based course designed to in- 
struct the dental hygiene student with the duties and responsibilities required 
of them to obtain and maintain optimum oral health for each patient. Emphasis 
will be placed on the preventive procedures which are utilized to aid in 
decreasing the incidence of oral diseases. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

DEH1800L CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE I LABORATORY 

(Co-requisite: DEH 1800) The objectives of this course are identification and 
morphology of tooth anatomy and its application to the complete oral 
prophylaxis. The techniques of instrumentation and polishing are mastered on 
the dental manikin before transferring procedures to human patients. En- 
compassed in this course are medical history procedures, sterilization 
techniques, oral inspection and evaluation, factors involved in the retention of 
dental deposits; soft, hard and stains, their etiology, composition, removal and 
prevention as it relates to the oral prophylaxis and complete patient care. 0-15-5* 
(offered Fall term) 

DEH 1802C CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE II 

(Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or above is required in Clinical Dental Hygiene 
courses DEH 1800, DEH 1802C, DEH 2806C, DEH 2808C). Students will be 
required to complete a specific number of dental prophylaxes for adults and 
children in the clinic under the supervision of the clinical supervisor and staff. 
This course will also include practical experience in dental radiology, fluorides, 
vital signs, emergency procedures (CPR), initial dental disease control and in- 
troduction to Practice Administration. 2-9-5* (offered Winter term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
176 



Dental Health Services 



)EH 2600 PERIODONTICS 

This course deals with the clinical and histological characteristics of 
periodontal anatomy, and the classification and basic etiology of periodontal 
diseases. More specifically, the content includes gingivitis, gingival 
enlargement, periodontitis, periodontosis, periodontal occlusal trauma, gingival 
recession, periocoronitis, abscess and cysts; examination, diagnosis, prognosis 
and treatment planning; plaque control in periodontal therapy; root planning; 
surgical periodontal procedure including gingival curettage. 1-0-1* (offered Fall 
term) 

lEH 2702C COMMUNITY AND PRIVATE PREVENTIVE DENTISTRY 

This is a series of lectures and laboratories to familiarize the dental hygiene 
student with the methods and materials used for teaching dental health 
education to schools, community groups and private patients. This en- 
compasses a study of present day philosophy and practices of public health and 
public health dentistry. It is also a study of the newest concepts of preventive 
dentistry, its'meaning, aims and responsibilities of the dental profession. 1-2-2* 
(offered Fall term) 

iEH 2806C CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE III 

This course is a continuation of Clinical Dental Hygiene II with the addition of 
ultrasonic and curettage procedures as clinical activities. Also included is an 
increased coverage of Practice Administration and Legal Aspects of Dentistry. 
2-12-6* (offered Fall term) 
1EH2808C CLINICAL DENTAL HYGIENE IV 

This course is a continuation of Clinical Dental Hygiene III with the addition of 
rubber dam procedures and polishing amalgam restorations as clinical ac- 
tivities. 1-12-5* (offered Winter term) 

Cental Support 

)ES 1000 DENTAL ANATOMY 

The study of the structure, morphology, and function of the primary and per- 
manent dentitions. 2-0-2* (offered Fall term) 

>ES 1000L DENTAL ANATOMY LABORATORY 

Laboratory procedures include the identification and the reproduction of tooth 
forms by drawing and carving representative teeth. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall term) 

>ES 1100 ELEMENTS OF DENTAL MATERIALS 

A series of lecture-demonstrations designed to acquaint the student with the 
nomenclature, characteristics, proper manipulation, and application of the 
materials used in the laboratory and clinical practice of dentistry. The 
procedures for purchasing and storage of supplies will be considered. 2-0-2* 
(offered Fall term for Dental Hygiene and Dental Lab Tech. Offered Winter term 
for Dental Assisting) 
1ES 1100L LABORATORY FOR DENTAL MATERIALS 

Laboratory for DES 1100. 0-3-1 * (offered Fall term for Dental Hygiene and Dental 
Lab Tech. Offered Winter term for Dental Assisting) 

ES 1200C DENTAL RADIOLOGY 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the nature, physical 
behavior, biological effects, methods of control, safety precautions and the 
techniques for exposing, processing, and mounting X-rays. Laboratory 
procedures will include application of these techniques in clinical practice. 1-2- 
2* (offered Summer term for Dental Assisting; Fall term for Dental Hygiene) 

Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

177 



Dental Health Services 

"Dental Lab Technology 
DTE 1000 ORIENTATION AND TERMINOLOGY 

The course is designed to acquaint the student with the role of the dental 
technician as a member of the dental health team and to familiarize him with the 
terms peculiar to the dental profession in order that he may interpret the 
directives included in a dentist's work authorization. A knowledge of equipment 
maintenance and safety factors will be considered. 1-0-1* (offered Fall term) 

DTE 1100C COMPLETE DENTURE TECHNIQUES I 

This course is designed to teach the student the various phases of full denture 
construction. The laboratory work consists of the construction of custom trays, 
base plates, stabilized occlusion, and mounting casts. The set-up of artificial 
teeth on an adjustable articulator. Special emphasis is placed on proper tooth 
selection, correct occlusion, waxing, curing, finishing, and polishing. Denture 
repairs and tooth replacement are also covered. 2-6-4* (offered Fall term) 

DTE1101C COMPLETE DENTURE TECHNIQUES II 

Continuation of DTE 1100C. 2-9-5* (offered Winter term) 

DTE1110C CAST INLAY AND CROWN TECHNIQUES 

This course covers the construction of various casts and dies, the waxing, 
carving, investing, casting, finishing and polishing inlays, three-fourths crown, 
full and veneer-faced crowns. It also includes the methods of soldering. 1-2-2* 
(offered Fall term) 

DTE 1120C PARTIAL DENTURE TECHNIQUES I 

The basic techniques used in the construction of partial dentures with special 
emphasis on surveying and designing. The design and use of wrought wire 
construction is covered. 1-3-2* (offered Winter term) 

DTE1140C CERAMICS 

A course on the manipulation of porcelain in the construction of jacket crowns 
and inlays including staining and characterization; also, it includes techniques 
for bonding porcelain to metal in bridgework and the design and construction of 
thimble type restorations. 3-12-7* (offered Winter term) 

DTE 1150C CROWN AND BRIDGE TECHNIQUE I 

Technical procedures required in the construction of fixed bridges from various 
types of impressions. 2-9-5* (offered Fall term) 

DTE 1200 JURISPRUDENCE AND ETHICS 

A knowledge of the legal aspects of the dental practice and dental laboratory 
business including the code of ethics for dental laboratory technicians. 1-0-1' 
(offered Winter term) 

DTE 2121 C PARTIAL DENTURE TECHNIQUES II 

An advanced course covering cast partial denture construction including the 
use of precision and semi-precision attachments. 2-6-4* (offered Spring term) 

DTE 2130C SPECIAL PROSTHESIS 

A technical review of courses covered to acquaint the student with lates 
developments. An introduction to some of the unique procedures anc 
specialties in dental laboratory technology. 1-2-2* (offered Fall term) 

DTE 21 31 C ORTHO AND PEDO REMOVABLE APPLIANCES 

The student will acquire the knowledge and skill required to fabricate and repai 
selected orthodontic wrought wire and self-curing plastic appliances. 1-2-2' 
(offered Spring term) 

DTE 2151 C CROWN AND BRIDGE TECHNIQUE II 

Advanced techniques to include the use of various types of facings and pontics 
both plastic and porcelain, and precision connectors. Special emphasis is giver 
on proper alignment, contour and tooth form. 1-9-4* (offered Winter term) 

178 



Engineering Technology 

Engineering Technology 

r ACULTY: Rader (Chairperson), Baldree, Book, Bussell, Carlos, 
Gans, Millard, Purtz 

/IAJORS: It is possible to complete some programs in four regular 
semesters. However, depending upon the student's 
entry level and the frequency of course offerings, certain 
programs will require the attendance at the Spring 
and/or Summer Term(s). 

SSOCIATION DEGREE PROGRAMS (A.S.) 

Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology 

Automotive Technology 

Building Construction Management 

Commercial Pilot Technology 

Computer Technology 

Drafting and Design Technology 

Electronics Technology 

Fire Science Technology 

Land Surveying 

ERTIFICATE PROGRAMS 

Air Conditioning and Refrigeration Specialist 
Drafting Specialist 
Surveyor Technician 

OLLEGE PARALLEL PROGRAMS (A.A.) 

Building Construction 
Computer Science (Business Option) 
Computer Science (Systems Option) 
Engineering (all branches) 
Industrial Arts (teacher) 

JOURSE PREFIXES: AER, ASC, ATF, ATT, BCN, CDA, COC, COP, 
EGN, ETD, ETE, ETG, ETI, ETM, FFP, MTB, SUR 




179 



Engineering Technology 




ASSOCIATE DEGREE PROGRAMS (A.S.): 

AIR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 08-183) 

The Air Conditioning and Rafrigeration Technology Program at Palm Beach Junior 
College begins with the most basic and fundamental concepts of theory and practice 
and progresses into the more technically advanced area. Some General Education 
courses are included in the curriculum. Upon completion of the course of study, the 
graduate will be qualified to enter any of the many possible vocations found in the 
rapidly growing fields of air conditioning and refrigeration today. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



COURSE 

ETE1001C 

ETM1101 

ETM 1613C 

MTB1321 

ENC1103 

ETM 1610C 

ETM 1614C 

ETD1501C 

MTB1322 

ENC1136 



ETM 2671 C 
ETM 2633 
ETM 2650C 

ETM 2750C 
HES 1400 

ETM 1612 
ETM 2103 
ETM 2660C 
AMH2010* 
ETI 2633 



TITLE 

Essentials of Electricity 

Introduction to Solar Energy 

Principles of Refrigeration 

Technical Mathematics I 

Freshman Communications I 

Principles of Air Conditioning. 

Refrigeration Cycles & Systems 

Drafting for Air Conditioning 

Technical Mathematics II 

Freshman Communications II 

Physical Education 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Refrig. Equip. For A/C Systems 

Commercial Refrigeration Systems . . . 
Control Systems for Refrigeration 

& Air Conditioning 

Planning of Air Conditioning Systems . 
Standard First Aid & Personal Safety. . 

Physical Education 

Heating and Ventilation 

Solar Radiation and Collectors 

Air Distribution and Layout 

U.S. History to 1865 

Industrial Relationships 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
Fall Winter 

4 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 
3 
2 
3 
3 
1 



16 

3 
3 

4 
3 
1 
1 



15 



15 



3 
3 
4 
3 
3 

16 



*POS 1001 or POS 2041 may be substituted. 
180 



Engineering Technology 



AUTOMOTIVE TECHNOLOGY PROGRAM (APPRENTICESHIP) (A.S. 08-188) 

he Automotive Technology Program is a three-year work/study program that places 
>otential technicians in participating local dealerships for full-time, on-the-job 
raining. At the same time, apprentices will attend academic classes on the Palm 
leach Junior College campus and technical laboratory classes on the Palm Beach 
bounty Technical School campus, receiving instruction in courses balanced between 
echnical and nontechnical studies. This program abides by the apprenticeship 
tandards for the National Automotive Dealers Association. 
PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS 
Major Technical Core Course Requirements: 



IOURSE 

ER 1000 
ER 1004 
ER1100 
ER1112 
ER1120 
ER1121 
ER1131 
ER1162 
ER1171 
ER1940 
ER 1941 
ER 1942 
ER 2940 
ER 2941 
ER 2942 



TITLE 

Integrated Automotive Systems 

Power Plant Overhaul Theory 

Auto Electrical Systems 

Advanced Engine Diagnosis 

Steering and Suspension Systems 

Brake Systems and Chassis Repair 

Transmission and Drive Systems 

Automotive Parts and Service Dept. Mgmt. 

Heating and Air Conditioning Theory 

Apprentice Experience I 

Apprentice Experience II 

Apprentice Experience III 

Apprentice Experience IV 

Apprentice Experience V 

Apprentice Experience VI 



) Academic Core Course Requirements: 



NC1103 
NC1136 

or 
NC1313 
TD1110C 
Tl 2633 
ES 1000 
HTB1321 
OS 1001 
SY2012 



Freshman Communications I . 
Freshman Communications II. 



Technical Writing (3) 

Introduction to Technical Drawing 

Industrial Relationships 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 

Technical Mathematics I 

Introduction to Political Science 

General Psychology 



I) Elective Courses (6 credits): 
UL2111 Business Law I 



IAN 1700 
1AR2101 
1TB 1322 
SC 1341 
ES1330 



CREDITS 

3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 
3 



33 



23 



Introduction to Business 

Salesmanship 

Technical Mathematics II 

Survey of Physical Science II 

Business English 

TOTAL 62 

IOTE: Credit will be granted by Palm Beach Junior College for technical core courses 
s they are completed, upon notification from the Technical School instructor, 
tudents shall be enrolled at Palm Beach junior College during the time they are taking 
schnical school work. Successful completion of this program shall lead to an 
associate in Science degree. 

181 



Engineering Technology 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION MANAGEMENT (A.S. 08-198) 

This Building Construction curriculum is designed for persons currently employed ir 
the construction business who wish to advance themselves in the management area. A 
student who wishes a certificate rather than an Associate in Science Degree may do sc 
by completing only the Building Construction courses and qualifying for the Buildinj 
Construction Experience credit. 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION COURSES 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

BCN 1272 Plans Interpretation 3 

BCN 1616 Advanced Construction Estimating 3 

BCN 1750 Construction Finance 3 

BCN 1740 Construction Law 3 

BCN 2220 Construction Materials and Methods 3 

BCN 2712 Construction Supervision Procedure 3 

BCN 2941 Building Construction Experience 4 

SUR 1001 Project Layout 3 

25 
ADDITIONAL COURSES REQUIRED FOR A.S. DEGREE 

SUR 2100C Surveying I 4 

ETD1110C Introduction to Technical Drawing 2 

BCN 2253C Architectural Drafting 3 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

HES 1400 Standard First Aid & Personal Safety 1 

BCN 1210 Building Construction Materials 3 

Physical Education 2 

POS 2041 * * American National Government 3 

PSC 1341 Physical Science II 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

MTB 1321 Technical Math 1 3 

MTB 1322 Technical Math II 3 

38 
* HES 2121 may be substituted. 
**POS 1001 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
***SUR 1001 PROJECT LAYOUT may be A.S. credit for graduation in the Buildinc 
Construction Management Program in lieu of any of the above construction courses. 




182 



Engineering Technology 

OMMERCIAL PILOT TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 08-197) 

uccessful completion of this program is designed to qualify students for a com- 
lercial pilot's license. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



OURSE 

SC 1000 
NC1103 
OC1200 
TB1321 
SC 1640 

SC1001 
SC 2550 
FT 1100 
ITB1322 
NC1136 



SC1100 
FT 2200 
SC1513 
OS 1001* 
ES1000** 
SC 2690 
FT 2300 
SC2110 
SC 2005 
SC 1341 
SC1341L 



he following credit shall be given if a student holds: 

Private License Commercial License 

ASC1000 ASC1000 

ASC1001 ASC1001 

AFT 1100 AFT 1100 

ASC1100 

AFT 2200 

'AMH 2010 or POS 2041 may be substituted. 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 



TITLE Fall 

Introduction to Aviation Ground School 2 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Technical Mathematics I 3 

Propulsion Systems 3 

Physical Education 1 

Private Pilot Ground School 

Aerodynamics 

Flight — Private 

Technical Mathematics II 

Freshman Communications II 

Physical Education 

15 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Commercial — Instr. Pilot Ground School 3 

Flight — Commercial 6 

Survey of Physical Science I 3 

Introduction to Political Science 3 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Instrument Ground School 

Flight/Instrument 

Advanced Navigation & Meteorology 

Aerospace and Air Travel 

Survey of Physical Science II 

Physical Science Laboratory 



Winter 



16 



17 



16 



Instrument License 

ASC 2690 
AFT 2300 
ASC 1000 
ASC 1001 
AFT 1100 
AFT 2200 



183 



Engineering Technology 

COMPUTER TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 08-126) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDI1 
COURSE TITLE Fall Winte 

ACC 1001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 

COC1110 Introduction to Computers 3 

COC1040 Structured Programming 3 

COP 1160 Programming RPG II 3 

COP 1400 Basic Assembly Language 3 

ECO 2013 Principles of Economics I 3 

ENC1103 Freshman Communications,! 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

MGF1113** General Education Math, Modules A,D,J . . 3 

Physical Education 1 

POS 1001 * Introduction to Political Science 3 

15 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

COP2120 Programming COBOL 3 

COP2121 COBOL Applications 3 

COP 2461 RPG II Applications 3 

COC 2301 Systems and Applications 3 

ETI 2633 Industrial Relationships 3 

HES 1000 Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MGF 1113** General Education Math, Modules E,H,I 3 

Physical Education 1 

Electives** 3 7 

15 16 

*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
** Electives should be cleared with academic advisor. 
***Math modules may be taken in any sequence. Higher math may be substituted. 

DRAFTING AND DESIGN TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 08-178) 

The Drafting and Design Technology curriculum prepares the student foremploymer 
in the field of technical graphical representation. The classroom training provides 
sound foundation in the basics of drafting practice and in the sophomore yes 
presents drafting techniques in such design areas as are in the responsibility of th 
draftsman. 



184 



Engineering Technology 



COURSE 

ENC1103 
HES 1000 
PSC1341 
PSC1341L 

EGN1130C 

MTB 1321 * 

EGN1120C 

MTB1322* 

SOC1200 

TI1411C 

TD1700 

TD1701 



3CN 2253C 
3CN 1210 
TD 2801 
TG 2530C 

POS2041** 
;OC1100 
NC1136 
TD2711C 

CTD 2450 
Tl 2633 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



TITLE 

Freshman Communications I 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 

Survey of Physical Science II 

Physical Science Laboratory 

Physical Education 

Engineering Graphics I 

Technical Mathematics I 

Engineering Graphics II 

Technical Mathematics II 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 

Manufacturing Processes 

General Drafting I 

General Drafting II 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Architectural Drafting 

Construction Materials 

Technical Illustration 

Properties of Material 

American National Government 

Introduction to Computers 

Freshman Communications II 

Machine Drafting 

Advanced Engineering Design 

Industrial Relationships 

Physical Education 



SEMESTER 

HOURS CREDIT 

Fall Winter Spring 

3 
2 
3 
1 
1 
2 
3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 



15 

3 
3 
3 
4 
3 



16 



15 



15 



*1104 or MAC 1144 may be substituted. 
**POS 1001 may be substituted. 
***ENC 1313 may be substituted. 
***HES2121 may be substituted. 

LECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 08-177) 

killed technicians are needed in increasing numbers to assist in the design, 
jroduction, operation, and servicing of electrical and electronic systems and equip- 
nent. They may work in laboratories assisting professional engineers and scientists, 

r on the assembly line in testing and inspection, or apply their knowledge of science, 
nathematics, and electronics to practical problems of design and construction on 
esearch and development. At Palm Beach Junior College students become familiar 
with the latest theory and practice in electrical and electronical circuitry, and become 
jroficient in the use of industrial testing instruments. The result is to place the 
qualified graduate firmly in the technician category, between the skilled craftsman and 
he engineer, and provide a sound scientific foundation for further learning in the field. 



185 



Engineering Technology 

ELECTRONICS TECHNOLOGY (Cont'd) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE Fall Winter Spring 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

ETD 1601C Electrical Drafting 2 

ETE1010 DC Circuit Analysis 3 

ETE1010L DC Circuit Analysis Lab 1 

ETE 1020 AC Circuit Analysis 3 

ETE1020L AC Circuit Analysis Lab 1 

ETE 1 100 Basic Electronics 3 

ETE2633C Logic Circuits 4 

HES1400 Standard First Aid & Personal Safety 1 

MTB 1321 ** Technical Mathematics I 3 

MTB 1322** Technical Mathematics II 3 

POS1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

Physical Education 1 

15 16 3 

*POS2041 orAMH 2010 may be substituted. 
** MAC 1104 may be substituted. 
***MAC 1144 may be substituted. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

The student, after completing the 34 semester hours listed above, will have the 
following options. The student may select electronics option, in which either ETE 
2420C microprocessors or ETE 2680C communications electronics may be elected, oi 
the power option may be elected. 

Option-Electronics Fall Winter 

ETE2102C Electronics I 4 

ETE2122C Electronics II 4 

ETE 2421 C Communications Electronics 4 

or 

ETE 2680C Microprocessors . . (4) 

ETE 2514C Advanced Electricity 4 

ETI 2633 Industrial Relationships 3 

Physical Education 1 

Technical Electives 4 4 

13 15 

, Option-Power 

ETE 2102C Electronics I 4 

ETE 2122C Electronics II 4 

ETE2210C Servo-Mechanisms & Instrumentation 4 

SUR2100C Surveyingl 4 

ETE 2541 Power Transmission 3 

ETE 2550C DC/AC Dynamos 4 

ETG 2530C Properties & Testing of Materials 4 

Physical Education 1 

15 13 

186 



Engineering Technology 



IRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 08-195) 

he Fire Science Technology curriculum is designed for persons currently employed 

'ho wish to advance in various fire service categories. A student wishing to earn a 

ertificate rather than an Associate in Science Degree may do so by completing only 

le Fire Science Technology courses. 

tudents in the Fire Science Program may receive 2 semester hours credit for EMT 1 

y presenting a valid current state certificate to the department chairperson. 

ight semester hours credit will be awarded for EMT 2208 EMERGENCY MEDICAL 

ECHNOLOGY PARAMEDIC I, if the student presents a valid current state certificate 

> the department chairperson. 

FIRE SCIENCE COURSES 

SEMESTER 
OURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

FP 1000 Introduction to Fire Science Technology 3 

FP 1203 Fire Prevention 3 

FP 1600 Fire Apparatus and Equipment 3 

FP 1640 Fire Hydraulics 3 

FP 2300 Related Fire Codes and Ordinances 3 

FP 2320 Building Construction for Fire Protection 3 

FP 2100 Fire Administration 3 

FP 2240 Fire Investigation and Arson Detection 3 

FP 2500 Hazardous Materials 3 

27 
ADDITIONAL COURSES REQUIRED FOR A.S. DEGREE 

CN 1272 Plans Interpretation 3 

NC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

NC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

ES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

ES1400** Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 1 

H1 1100 The Art of Thinking 3 

IAN 2100 Supervision-Human Relations 3 

IGF 1113** General Education Math I 3 

OS 21 12 American State and Local Government 3 

PC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

OC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

OS 1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

Physical Education : 2 

Elective 3 

38 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
**A student holding a first aid instructor's course certificate may substitute an 
ective for HES 1400. 
***MAT 1002 may be substituted. 
* * *POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



187 



Engineering Technology 




LAND SURVEYING (A.S. 08-179) 

The land surveying program is designed to prepare a student for immediate en 
ployment in the land surveying profession in a position less than professional, and t< 
transmit the technical knowledge necessary for the professional registratio 
examination. 



FRESHMAN YEAR 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT! 



COURSE 

SUR2100C 

SUR2500 

ETD2121C 

ETD1110C* 

ENC1103 

ENC1136 

HES1400 

SOC 1200 

MTB1321** 

MTB1322** 



SUR2610C 
SUR 2201 C 
SUR 2402 
SUR 2300C 
SUR 2330 
SUR 2400 
SUR 2402 

POS1001** 



TITLE Fall 

Surveying I 4 

Electronic & Geodetic Surveying 

Surveying Drawing 

Introduction to Technical Drawing 2 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 

Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 

Physical Education 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Technical Math I 3 

Technical Math II 

Elective 

15 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Surveying II 4 

Surveying III 

Subdivisions 

Topography and Mapping 3 

Photogrammetry 3 

Legal Aspects of Surveying 3 

Land Surveys and Descriptions 

Physical Education 

Introduction to Political Science 3 

Elective* *** 



Wintei 

3 
2 



16 



16 



15 



* For those with previous drawing experience EGN 1130C is required. 
' *MAT 1033 or higher math course may be substituted. 
' * POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

*ACC1001 orBUL2111 is recommended. 



188 



Engineering Technology 

ERTIFICATE PROGRAMS: 

IR CONDITIONING AND REFRIGERATION SPECIALISTS (CT. 08-182) 

program designed to provide a broad background in air conditioning theory and 
■actice. 

SEMESTER 
OURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

TE1001C Essentials of Electricity 4 

M 1613C Principles of Refrigeration 3 

M 1610 Principles of Air Conditioning 3 

M 1614C Refrigeration Cycles 4 

M 2630 Air Conditioning Systems 3 

or 

TM 1612 Heating and Ventilating , (3) 

AN 2770 Small Business Management 3 

l"D1110C Introduction to Technical Drawing 2 

TB1321 Technical Maath 1 3 

ES 1400 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 1 

I'M 1101 Introduction to Solar Energy 3 

29 
RAFTING SPECIALIST (CT. 08-181) 

SEMESTER 

OURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

I'D 1700 General Drafting 1 3 

I'D 1701 General Drafting II 3 

N1130C Engineering Graphics I 2 

N1120C Engineering Graphics II 3 

ES1400 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 1 

ri1411C Manufacturing Processes . . 3 

TG 2530C Properties and Testing of Materials 4 

TB1321 Technical Math I 3 

TB1322 Technical Math II 3 

25 
URVEYOR TECHNICIAN (CT. 08-187) 

SEMESTER 

OURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

UR 1001 Project Layout 3 

UR 2100C Surveying I 4 

UR2201C Surveying III 4 

UR 2300C Topography and Mapping 3 

UR 2400 Legal Aspects of Surveying 3 

TD1110C Introduction to Technical Drawing 2 

TD2121C Surveying Drawing 2 

ITB1321 Technical Mathematics I 3 

ITB 1322 Technical Mathematics II 3 

ES 1400 First Aid and Personal Safety 1 

28 



189 



Engineering Technology 

COLLEGE PARALLEL PROGRAMS (A.A.) 

BUILDING CONSTRUCTION (A.A. 08-185) SEMESTER 

HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE Fall Winter 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

COC1110 Intro, to Computers 3 

EGN 1 130C Engineering Graphics I 2 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAC 1104 College Algebra 3 

MAC 1144 Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 3 

Physical Education .' 1 1 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Electives 3 

16 14 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ACC 1001 Principles of Accounting 1 3 

BCN 2253C Architectural Drafting 3 

Literature 3 

BCN 1210 Building Construction Materials 3 

EGN 2312 Statics 3 

MAC2411 Calculusl 3 

PHY 2023 General Physics I 3 

PHY 2048L General Physics I Laboratory 1 

PHY 2024 General Physics II 3 

PHY 2049L General Physics II Laboratory 1 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

General Education Electives 3 

*HES 2121 may be substituted. 16 16 

**POS2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

COMPUTER SCIENCE (A.A. 08-127) 

(Business Option) FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ACC 1001 Principles of Accounting I 3 

ACC 1021 Principles of Accounting II 3 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 1011 Music Appreciation (3) 

COC1110 Introduction to Computers 3 

COP 1400 Basic Assembly Language 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000 Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAC 1104 College Algebra 3 

Physical Education 2 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 



31 



190 



Engineering Technology 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

OP 21 10 Mathematical Programming (Fortran IV) 3 

OP 2120 Programming COBOL 3 

30 2013 Principles of Economics I 3 

CO 2023 Principles of Economics II 3 

OS 1001 * Introduction to Political Science 3 

SY 2012 General Psychology 3 

FA2014 Statistics 3 

Literature • 3 

Science* * 6 

Elective 3 

33 

'POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

'Check with your academic advisor as to the upper division school you wish to at- 
nd, as entry requirements vary from school to school. 

OMPUTER SCIENCE (A.A. 08-127) 
ystems Option) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 

OURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

OC1110 Introduction to Computers 3 

OC 1400 Basic Assembly Language 3 

■JC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

sIC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

ES 1000 Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

AC 1 104 College Algebra 3 

AC 1144 Trigonometry & Analytic Geometry 3 

Physical Education 2 

OS 1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

OC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

TA2014 Statistics 3 

31 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

!H 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

UL1011 Music Appreciation (3) 

OP 21 10 Mathematical Programming (Fortran IV) 3 

OP 2120 Programming COBOL 3 

AC2411 Calculusl 3 

AC 2412 Calculus II 3 

HY 2023* * General Physics I 3 

HY2024** General Physics II 3 

HY 2048L General Physics I Lab 1 

HY 2049L** General Physics II Lab 1 

SY 2012 General Psychology 3 

Literature - 3 

Elective 3 

32 
POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

*Check with your academic advisor as to the upper division school you wish to at- 
5nd, as entry requirements vary from school to school. 

191 



Engineering Technology 



ENGINEERING (A.A. 08-176) 

The program basic to almost all engineering curricula stresses a sound foundation in 
science and mathematics along with humanities and the social studies. This provides 
the engineer not only with necessary prerequisites for further technical studies, but 
also with a knowledge of the world and its problems; a knowledge necessary to aid the 
engineer in his engineering career. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



COURSE 

CHM 1045 
CHM 1045L 
CHM 1046 
CHM 1046L 
EGN1130C 
EGN1120C 
EGN 1001 
ENC1103 
ENC1136 
MAC 1144 
MAC 2411 
SOC 1200 
POS1001* 



ARH 1000 

or 
MUL1011 

HES1000** 
MAC 2412 
MAC 2413 

PHY 2048 
PHY 2048L 
PHY 2049 
PHY 2049L 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 



TITLE Fall 

General Chemistry I 3 

General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

General Chemistry II 

General Chemistry II Laboratory 

Engineering Graphics I 2 

Engineering Graphics II 

Engineering Problems & Orientation 1 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 

Trigonometry & Analytic Geometry 3 

Calculus I 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Introduction to Political Science 

16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Art Appreciation 

Music Appreciation (3) 

Literature 3 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Calculus II 3 

Calculus III v 

Physical Education 1 

General Physics with Calculus I 3 

General Physics with Calculus I Lab 1 

General Physics with Calculus II 

General Physics with Calculus II Lab 

Electives*** 3 



16 



16 



3 
1 
3 

15 



' POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

'HES 2121 may be substituted. 

"COP 21 10 is recommended as an elective 



192 



Engineering Technology 




INDUSTRIAL ARTS (A.A. 08-184) 

This program will provide the necessary general education requirements for the first 
two years of a four-year course leading to a Bachelor's Degree in Industrial Arts 
Education. In addition, it includes basic courses of the major field for teacher cer- 
tification in the state of Florida. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ART 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

EGN 1130C Engineering Graphics I 2 

EGN1120C Engineering Graphics II 3 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

AMH2010 U.S. History to 1865 3 

MAC 1104 Algebra 3 

MAC 1144 Trigonometry & Analytic Geometry 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

15 18 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARV1208 Graphic Arts I 3 

BCN 2253C Architectural Drafting 3 

Literature 3 

BCN 1210 Building Construction Materials 3 

PHY 2023 General Physics I 3 

PHY 2048L General Physics I Laboratory 1 

PHY 2024 General Physics II 3 

PHY 2049L General Physics II Laboratory , 1 

PSY2012 General Psychology 3 

General Education Electives** 3 6 

16 16 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 

"Suggested electives: ART 1110, ART 1111, SES 1100, EDF 1005, PH1 1100, EGC 2120. 

193 



Engineering Technology 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Automotive: 

AER 1000 INTEGRATED AUTOMOTIVE SYSTEMS 

Theory related instruction to supplement apprenticeship training on-the-job. An 
introductory course in auto technology, designed for automotive apprentices, 
that provides theory for foundation in the field of automotive technology. 2-2-3* 

AER 1004 POWER PLANT OVERHAUL THEORY 

Theory related instruction to supplement the apprentice's on-the-job training. 
Instruction in the theoretical procedures necessary to completely rebuild an 
automotive engine. Includes the disassembly and assembly techniques, along 
with the restoring of tolerances by the mach ning of engine components. 2-2-3* 

AER 1 100 AUTO ELECTRICAL SYSTEMS 

Theory related instruction to supplement the apprentice's on-the-job training. A 
study of the basic electrical systems found in automotive equipment. Topics 
include lighting systems, schematic troubleshooting, power assist systems and 
wiring harnesses. 2-2-3* 

AER 1112 ADVANCED ENGINE DIAGNOSIS 

Theory related instruction to supplement the apprentice's on-the-job training. A 
continuation of AER 1000 with special emphasis on advanced diagnosis, 
testing, and repair procedure. The theoretical application of the chassis 
dynamometer, HC/CO testers, and oscilloscopes is stressed. 2-2-3* 

AER 1120 STEERING AND SUSPENSION SYSTEMS 

Theory related instruction to supplement the apprentice's on-the-job training. 
Theoretical study of steering systems (both power and manual), suspension 
systems, and wheel alignment. Suspension, front end, and steering repair and 
alignment is stressed. 2-2-3* 

AER 1121 BRAKE SYSTEMS AND CHASSIS REPAIR 

Theory related instruction to supplement the apprentice's on-the-job training. 
Related trade theory of servicing brake systems, window regulators, seat 
mechanisms, exhaust systems, and other chassis accessories. Instruction 
includes delivery and road test procedures. 2-2-3* 

AER 1131 TRANSMISSION AND DRIVE SYSTEMS 

Theory related instruction to supplement apprentice's on-the-job training. A 
study of automatic transmissions, clutches, standard transmissions, overdrives, 
propeller shafts, and drive axles. Includes "theory of operation, diagnosis, 
maintenance and repair. 2-2-3* 

AER 1162 AUTOMOTIVE PARTS AND SERVICE DEPARTMENT MANAGEMENT 

Theory related instruction to supplement the apprentice's on-the-job training. 
An in-depth study of parts numbering, storage, cataloging, retrieval, ordering, 
and stocking management techniques. Other topics include marketing 
techniques, financial analysis, personnel management, work scheduling and 
distribution, and use of pricing manuals. 2-2-3* 

AER 1171 HEATING AND AIR CONDITIONING THEORY 

Theory related instruction to supplement the apprentice's on-the-job training. 
Instruction in the theory of automotive heating and air-conditioning systems 
with emphasis placed on the basic air-conditioning cycle. 2-2-3* 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
194 



Engineering Technology 

AER1940 APPRENTICE EXPERIENCE I 
AER1941 APPRENTICE EXPERIENCE II 
AER1942 APPRENTICE EXPERIENCE III 
AER2940 APPRENTICE EXPERIENCE IV 
AER2941 APPRENTICE EXPERIENCE V 
AER2942 APPRENTICE EXPERIENCE VI 

Credit will be granted to an apprentice who satisfactorily completes a term of 

training on the job. One credit each term. 

Aeronautical Studies 

ASC 1000 INTRODUCTION TO AVIATION GROUND SCHOOL 

A survey course designed to familiarize the new aviation student with op- 
portunities available in the field of aviation and to introduce basic information 
required to become a pilot. 2-h-2* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

ASC 1001 PRIVATE PILOT GROUND SCHOOL 

(Prerequisite: ASC 1000) A study of all the theory of flight, navigation, 
meteorology, aircraft performance and regulations required to prepare for the 
F.A.A. Private Pilot written examination. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

ASC 1100 COMMERCIAL/INSTRUMENT PILOT GROUND SCHOOL 

(Prerequisite: ASC 1001) An advanced study of aircraft performance, theory of 
flight, navigation, air traffic control and FARS, with emphasis on advanced flying 
techniques in preparation for passing the F.A.A. Commercial Pilot written 
examination and a preview of material on the instrument examination. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall term) 

ASC 1640 PROPULSION SYSTEMS 

An investigation into the theory of engines and the related equipment, engine 
construction, engine operating procedures. Performance diagnosis and prin- 
ciples of safe engine operation in flight are emphasized. 3-0-3* (offered Fall 
term) 

ASC 2005 AEROSPACE AND AIR TRAVEL 

(Prerequisite: ATF 1000) A study of the movement of passengers and air freight 
and the operation of airlines. Such problems as financing, personnel, training, 
procurement of equipment, public relations, and other problems related to air 
carriers and contractors are studied. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

ASC 21 10 ADVANCED NAVIGATION AND METEOROLOGY 

(Prerequisite: ASC 1001) An advanced study of navigation procedures em- 
phasizing radio and electronic navigation. Part of the course will deal with 
weather theory and interpretation for the advanced pilot. 3-0-3* (offered Winter 
term) 

ASC 2550 AERODYNAMICS 

A study of physical principles involved in flight. The theory of airflow, airfoils, 
and the production of lift and drag are studied and applied to airplane per- 
formance, stability, and control. Special attention is given to high-speed and 
hovering flight. Emphasis is on the understanding of concepts with little at- 
tention to mathematical analysis. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

ASC 2690 INSTRUMENT GROUND SCHOOL 

(Prerequisite: ASC 1100) A continuation of Commercial/Instrument Ground 
School with emphasis on instrument navigation, flight procedures, approaches, 
weather for instrument pilots and advanced aircraft performance. Prepares 
student for F.A.A. instrument examination. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

195 



Engineering Technology 

Aviation Technology Flight 
ATF 1000 FLIGHT — BASIC 

(Co-requisite; ASC 1000) A scientific introduction to flight, through actual flight 
experience and lectures held by a qualified flight instructor. Course includes 10 
hours of dual flight instruction. This course will place the student in a more 
favorable position to qualify for the private pilot's certificate. 1-2-2* 

ATF 1100 FLIGHT — PRIVATE 

F.A.A. Private Pilot's license requires 20 hours of dual flight instruction and 20 
hours of solo flight. To successfully pass the F.A.A. examination, appropriate 
ground school should be included. 3-0-3* 

ATF 2200 FLIGHT — COMMERCIAL 

F.A.A. Commercial Pilot's license requires 250 hours of flight time, 50 hours of 
dual flight instruction, and the balance solo flight time. Several flight hours may 
be saved~by attending a F.A.A approved ground and flight school. The student is 
given examinations in both flight and ground subjects by the F.A.A. Three 
semester hours credit. 

ATF 2300 FLIGHT — INSTRUMENT 

For an instrument rating, the F.A.A. requires at least 200 hours of pilot flying 
time, plus 20 hours of instrument instruction, and 20 hours of pilot instrument 
time, with appropriate ground school. F.A.A. Flight and Ground examinations 
must be passed. Three semester hours credit. 

NOTE: All students enrolling in the Commercial Pilot Technician A.S. Degree program 

at Palm Beach Junior College must follow the procedure below to receive credits for 

flight courses required to complete the A.S. Degree. 

1. All flight time must be logged and certified by an appropriate F.A.A. certified 
flight instructor for the rating for which credit is being sought. 

2. Minimum flight time requirements for part 61 or part 141 FAR's must be met. 

3. All written examinations required for the rating sought must be passed with at 
least a minimum grade as specified by the F.A.A. 

4. Written proof of passing the required F.A.A. check ride must be submitted to the 
instructor or department chairperson before credit may be granted for the 
following courses: ATF 1 100, ATF 2200, ATF 2210 and ATF 2300. 

5. Proof of passing the appropriate F.A.A. written examination with a mark of 85% or 
higher will be considered for credit for the following ground school courses when 
appropriately documented and submitted to the instructor or department 
chairperson. ASC 1000, ASC 1100, and ASC 2690. 

In order to qualify for reduced flight time requirements under part 141, the student 

must take flight training from an approved flight school and ground training from an 

approved ground school. 

The instructor or department chairperson will provide a list of currently approved flight 

schools for the student to select and the college-offered courses will serve to meet the 

141 ground school requirements. 

ATT 1600 BASIC INSTRUMENT FLIGHT SIMULATOR LAB - new course 

Fifteen class hours required for FAA credit. This course consists of an in- 
troduction to simulator systems and basic instrument flight maneuvers in- 
volving development of calibration scan and interpretation techniques. One 
hour credit. 

ATT 2605 BASIC INSTRUMENT FLIGHT ADVANCED SIMULATOR LAB • new course 
Fifteen class hours required for FAA credit. This is a continuation of skill 
developed in simulator flight with emphasis on introduction to navigation 
systems and problems. One hour credit. 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
196 



Engineering Technology 

ATT 2610 ADVANCED INSTRUMENT FLIGHT SIMULATOR LAB - new course 

Twenty class hours required for FAA credit. Advanced simulator lab is designed 
to get the student proficient in all forms of cross-country IFR and approach IFR 
flight. Fifteen hours is creditable toward FAA flight instructor requirements; five 
hours toward instrument flight time requirements. One hour credit. 

The courses ATT 1600, ATT 2605, and ATT 2610 require department chairperson or 

course instructor approval prior to registration. 

ATT 2691 INSTRUMENT REFRESHER SIMULATOR LAB 

This course is a specialized modular course designed to cover simulator in- 
struction for experienced pilots on an individual needs basis: Course work will 
consist of 3-hour simulator modules designed to improve pilot proficiency in 
handling instrument flight problems and meeting FAA instrument currency 
requirements. Course requires instructor approval and is offered on demand. 
Completion of five (5) modules will earn one (1) credit hour. 

Building Construction 

BCN 1210 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS 

(Co-requisite: BCN 2253C) Sources, properties, and uses of construction 
materials. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

BCN 1272 PLANS INTERPRETATION 

A course designed to develop the student's ability to read and interpret working 
drawing and specifications as used in the construction industry. 3-0-3* 

SUR1001 PROJECT LAYOUT 

A study of the elementary theory and practice of plane surveying including 
taping, differential and profile leveling, cross sectioning, earthwork computing, 
transit, standia, and transit-tape surveying. 2-2-3* 

BCN 1616 ADVANCED CONSTRUCTION ESTIMATING 

An analysis and determination of building construction costs. Commences with 
the classification of materials, labor, and sub-contracted work into the smallest 
manageable units. Estimating more advanced elements of building con- 
struction, analysis of costs of complicated systems of construction involving 
commercial buildings. Includes indirect and overhead costs, the preparation of 
bid proposals and related documents. 3-0-3* 

BCN 1740 CONSTRUCTION LAW 

A study of the legal aspects of construction contracts and the responsibilities 
arising particularly from the field operations. Also includes relationship of 
general contractor to owner, architect, and sub-contractor; materialmen and 
mechanics lien law; bonds; labor law; O.S.H.A.; Workmans Compensation; 
taxes; and other statutes and ordinances regulating contractors. 3-0-3* 

BCN 1750 CONSTRUCTION FINANCE 

A study of building construction financing and related contract requirements. 
Topics include construction loans, permanent building mortgages, construction 
bids and contracts, penalty and incentive provisions, progress payments and 
retention, escalation provisions, cost extras, performance and bid bonds, 
company profits, cash flow, business loans, and insurance. 3-0-3* 

BCN 2220 CONSTRUCTION MATERIALS AND METHODS 

Designed primarily for the student with some work experience in the con- 
struction industry. Current construction methods are analyzed and classified 
with special attention given on how they evolved. Developments in new 
materials and systems are also discussed with emphasis on applications and 
future trends in South Florida. 3-0-3* 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

197 



Engineering Technology 

BCN 2253C ARCHITECTURAL DRAFTING 

(Prerequisite: ETD 1110C or EGN 1130C or equivalent; co-requisite: BCN 1210) 
Problems in architecture are studied, suchas details of footings, foundations, 
floors, walls, roofs and openings in masonry and wooden structures. Ap- 
plication is made through projects. 1-5-3* (ottered Fall term) 

BCN 2400 CONSTRUCTION MECHANICS 

(Prerequisite: PHY 2023; co-requisite MAC 2411) The study of external forces, 
thrust analysis and geometric properties of members as applied to the design of 
structure. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

BCN 2712 CONSTRUCTION SUPERVISION PROCEDURE 

Examines techniques of supervision and management of skilled and unskilled 
personnel on the job site, office personnel, and technical and professional in- 
dividuals. Includes problems of delegation of authority, accountability, morale* 
motivation, grievances, human relations, leadership, and incentive as en- 
countered in building construction. 3-0-3* 

BCN 2765 CONTRACTS, SPECIFICATIONS, CODES, AND ESTIMATES AND COSTS 
A course designed to teach the methods and procedures of consummating an 
engineering contract with code and cost limitations. 3-0-3* 

BCN 2941 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION EXPERIENCE 

Credit will be given to a person who can document four years of bona fide ex- 
perience toward journeyman level tradesmanship. 4-0-4* 

Computer Concepts 

COC1040 STRUCTURED PROGRAMMING 

(Prerequisite: COC 1110) This course teaches the concept of structured 
programming. It emphasizes the use of control graphs, basic structures, logic 
structures using pseudo-code, and functional structure charts. The course 
"stresses the importance of program segmentation and top-down walk-through. 
3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

COC 1110 INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTERS 

This course is intended for students with no previous data processing ex- 
perience. Topics include basic computer theory, file storage media, input-output 
devices, binary and hexa-decimal number systems. A short story of BASIC is 
included. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) (Replaces COC 1300) 

COC 2301 SYSTEMS AND APPLICATIONS 

A course which utilizes system analysis techniques for the solution of business 
data processing problems. It will include modern analysis techniques such as 
decision tables, CPM, PERT, as well as value analysis methods. It will also 
illustrate information theory concepts and how data base and data management 
techniques can be employed. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

COC 2930 SPECIAL TOPICS IN DATA PROCESSING 

(Prerequisite: Permission of instructor) This course will focus on advanced and 
specialized topics in data processing that would be of interest to advanced 
students and persons already employed in the data processing community. 3-0- 
3* (offered upon demand) 

Computer Programming 

COP 1160 PROGRAMMING RPG II 

(Prerequisite: COC 1110) RPG II (Report Program Generator) is a problem- 
oriented programming language designed essentially to obtain data from single 
or multiple rules, perform calculations and table lookup as required and write 
reports and/or update files. Students will solve elementary to moderately 
complex business problems. 2-2-3* (offered Winter term) (Replaces COP 2400C) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
198 



Engineering Technology 

COP 1400 BASIC ASSEMBLY LANGUAGE 

(Prerequisite: COC 1110) This course introduces basic concepts in computer 
programming using a low level machine-oriented language covering the ar- 
chitective, channels, registers I/O devices, instructions and data manipulation 
of the IBM 370 System. 2-2-3* (offered Winter term) (Replaces COP 2401C) 

COP 21 10 MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING (Taught in Mathematics Department) 
(Prerequisite: MAC 1104 or higher) This course introduces the student to flow- 
charting techniques and to the programming of mathematical problems in 
Fortran IV. Emphasis is on the algorithmic approach. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter 
& Spring terms) 

COP 2120 PROGRAMMING COBOL 

(Prerequisite: COC 1110) COBOL (Common Business Oriented Language) is the 
programming language specifically designed to solve business problems. 
Emphasis is on programming skills, efficiency in structured programming. 
Students are required to write and execute programs for comprehensive 
business case studies. 2-2-3* (offered Fall term) 

COP 2121 COBOL APPLICATIONS 

(Prerequisite: CQP 2120) Advanced study in the techniques of programming 
using the ANS COBOL language. Structured Programming Techniques are 
emphasized through the course. Programs will be entered into the IBM System 
370 Computer by means of CRT terminals. 2-2-3* (offered Winter term) 

COP 2461 RPG II APPLICATIONS 

(Prerequisites: COC 1110 and COP 1160C) This course deals with advanced high 
level RPG II (Report Program Generator) programming concepts and technique. 
After the student has completed the study of the material contained in the 
course, he should have a firm foundation in the concepts of programming in 
RPG II and should be capable of solving a wide variety of business type 
problems. 2-2-3* (offered Fall term) 

Engineering: General 

EGN 1001 ENGINEERING PROBLEMS AND ORIENTATION 

This course emphasizes the solution of engineering problems using dimen- 
sional analysis, elementary vector analysis, the slide rule, and other com- 
putational techniques. The course also provides a study of the history, basic 
principles, development, opportunities, and educational requirements for the 
principal fields of the engineering profession. 1-0-1 * (offered Fall term) 

EGN1120C ENGINEERING GRAPHICS II 

(Prerequisite: or co-requisite: EGN 1130C) This course is the application of the 
principles learned in EGN 1130C, for the preparation of engineering working 
drawings which include in addition to orthographic projection, dimensioning, 
tolerancing sectional views, and threads and fasteners. Inking, design prin- 
ciples, charts and graphs are also included. 1-5-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Spring) 

EGN1130C ENGINEERING GRAPHICS I 

(Prerequisite: ETD 1110C or one year senior high school drafting or its 
equivalent) This course deals with the study of spatial relations, and analysis of 
points, lines and surfaces (Descriptive Geometry), as a form of engineering 
communication. Manipulation of vectors and techniques of graphical solutions 
are also included. 1-3-2* (offered Fall, Winter, & Summer) 

EGN 2312 STATICS 

(Prerequisites: PHY 2023 and MAC 241 1) This course deals with the principles of 
mechanics; force systems; coplanar and noncoplanar; concurrent noncurrent; 
equilibrium; distributed forces moments of inertia; and structures. 3-0-3* (of- 
fered Winter term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 199 



Engineering Technology 

Engineering Technology: Drafting 

ETD 1110C INTRODUCTION TO TECHNICAL DRAWING 

This course is designed for the modern student, who realizes the need for 
communication with the world of technology. It is also a beginning course for 
students of engineering and technology. It deals with the fundamental prin- 
ciples of the graphic language (the language of industry), and is developed for 
students without previous mechanical drawing experience. Topics include: use 
and care of drawing instruments, lettering, multiview projection, sketching 
techniques and blueprint reading. 1-3-2* (offered all terms) 

ETD 1501C DRAFTING FOR AIR CONDITIONING 

(Prerequisite: ETD 1110C or high school drafting or experience) This course is 
designed to give students of the air-conditioning technology program a basic 
knowledge of architectural structure and drawing surface developments for 
duct work and electrical schematics. 1-3-2* (offered Winter term) 

ETD1601C ELECTRICAL DRAFTING 

This course gives particular attention and practice to electrical and electronic 
symbols, block diagrams, schematic diagrams, connection diagrams, printed 
circuits, charts and graphs and chassis. 1-3-2* (offered Winter term) 

ETD 1700 GENERAL DRAFTING I 

(Co- or prerequisite: EGN 1120C) This course is designed to extend drafting 
principles and techniques into a variety of industrial and engineering related 
fields; e.g., electrical, topographical, piping, etc. 1-5-3* (offered Winter term) 

ETD 1701 GENERAL DRAFTING II 

(Co- or prerequisite: EGN 1120C) A continuation of ETD 1700, including sheet- 
metal, welding and structural. 1-5-3* (offered Spring term) 

ETD2121C SURVEYING DRAWING 

(Prerequisite: SUR 2100C and ETD 1 1 10C or suitable experience) An introduction 
to the drafting techniques and drawings of surveying; lettering; line technique; 
geometry; lot survey plats; traverse plotting; horizontal, compound, and reverse 
curves; vertical curves; highway plan, profiles and cross-sections. 1-3-2* (offered 
Winter term) 

ETD 2450 ADVANCED ENGINEERING DESIGN 

(Co- or prerequisite: ETD 2711) A study of principles, practices and standards of 
machine drafting in original design as applied to industrial processes. Topics 
include jig and fixture design; punch and die set design; gauging; and selected 
advanced project. 1-5-3* (offered Winter term) 

ETD 271 1C MACHINE DRAFTING 

(Prerequisite: EGN 1120C) A study of principles, practices and standards of 
machine drafting as applied to power transmission. Topics include: basic drive 
units, couplings, bearings, seals, cams, lankages, actuators and fluid power. 
Industrial catalogs and publications are used in design problems. 1-3-2* (offered 
Winter term) 

ETD2801C TECHNICAL ILLUSTRATION 

(Prerequisite: EGN 1120C or consent of instructor) This course deals primarily 
with translation of ortho-graphic drawings into three-dimensional, pictorial 
representations. Topics include: axonmetric drawings; perspectives, and 
illustration techniques in shading, rendering and airbrush. 1-5-3* (offered Fall 
term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
200 



Engineering Technology 
ingineering Technology: Electrical 
•TE1001C ESSENTIALS OF ELECTRICITY 

This course covers basic circuit theory, electrical and electronic controls 
systems, electric motor circuits, servo-mechanisms which apply to the air 
conditioning industry; along with instruction in the use, care, and maintenance 
of electrical test equipment. It is designed for the student in air conditioning 
technology. 3-2-4* (offered Fall term) 
TE1010 DC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS 

(Co-requisites: ETE 1010L and MTB 1323) No prior knowledge of electricity is 
assumed; however, a working knowledge of basic high school algebra is 
developed and stressed. Students who are especially weak in math should 
consider taking remedial math in the Math Lab before enrolling in ETE 1010. 
This course is an in-depth study (at the precalculus level) of the circuit 
properties of resistance, capacitance and inductance in DC circuits. Topics 
covered include Ohms and Kirchhoffs Laws, series and parallel networks, 
network theorems, magnetic circuits, and DC instruments. The lectures stress 
theoretical understanding and algebraic and numeric solutions to practical word 
problems. Laboratory work closely parallels the lectures stressing the practical 
application of theory. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 
TE 1010L DC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS LABORATORY 

(Co-requisite: ETE 1010) Laboratory to accompany ETE 1010. 0-2-1* (offered Fall 
term) 

ETE 1020 AC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS 

(Prerequisite: ETE 1010; co-requisites: ETE 1020L, MTB 1322) The prerequisite 
course ETE 1010 deals with DC circuits; this course carries the analysis on to AC 
circuits. Topics covered include series and parallel AC networks, network 
theorems applied to AC, power, resonance, and transformers. The lectures 
stress theoretical understanding and algebraic and numeric solutions to 
practical word problems. Laboratory work closely parallels the lectures, rein- 
forcing the practical measurement of networks, and develops skills in the proper 
use and interpretation of sophisticated test equipment. 3-0-3* (offered Winter 
term) 

sTE 1020L AC CIRCUIT ANALYSIS LABORATORY 

(Co-requisite: ETE 1020L) Laboratory to accompany ETE 1020. 0-2-1* (offered 
Winter term) 

ETE 1100 BASIC ELECTRONICS 

(Prerequisite: ETE 1020) This course is a study of semi-conductor theory, on 
junctions, diode equivalent circuits, bipolar transistors and transistor biasing 
circuits. A simplified mathematical approach is stressed in all calculations so 
that a physical understanding of the circuit may be realized. 3-0-3* (offered 
Spring) 

ETE2102C ELECTRONICS I 

(Prerequisite: ETE 1100) This course is a continuation of semi-conductor tran- 
sistors and covers AC equivalent circuits, small signal amplifiers, class A and B 
amplifiers, field-affect transistors and analysis. A simplified mathematical 
approach is stressed so the student will have thorough understanding of the 
circuit. 3-2-4* (offered Fall term) 

ETE2122C ELECTRONICS II 

(Prerequisite: ETE 2102C) This is an advanced semi-conductor course covering 
frequency and bandwidth of transistor amplifiers, differential and operational, 
integrated circuits, feedback oscillators, Harmonic distortion, frequency mixing 
and modulation. A simplified mathematical approach is stressed in order for the 
student to understand the circuits. 3-2-4* (offered Winter term) 
Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 201 



Engineering Technology 

ETE 2210C SERVO — MECHANISM AND INSTRUMENTATION 

(Prerequisite: ETE 2514C or permission of instructor) This is a study of a com- 
plete system function and its component parts. Mathematics is introduced only 
in sufficient depth, to help the student fully understand how a system transfer 
function is used in frequency response testing. Topics covered are precision 
potentiometers, resolvus, transducers, synchros, mechanical electrical 
characteristics, servo motors and generators, stability and frequency response 
of serve systems. 3-2-4* (offered Winter term and sufficient enrollment) 

ETE2421C COMMUNICATION ELECTRONICS 

(Prerequisite: ETE 2122C) This course is a continuation of electronics, designed 
to enable students to pass the first class FCC license. It covers vacuum tube 
circuits, class C amplifiers, regulated power supplies, RF amplifiers, AM and FM 
modulation, transmission lines and antennas. 3-2-4* (offered Winter term) 

ETE 2514C ADVANCED ELECTRICITY 

(Prerequisites: ETE 1020, ETE 1020L) This course is a continuation of network 
analysis and a study of DC and AC motors and generators. Topics covered are: 
network theorems, loop and nodal analysis, mutual copied circuits, hybrid 
parameters, three-phase circuit analysis, and motors and generators. 3-2-4* 
(offered Fall term) 

ETE 2541 POWER TRANSMISSION 

(Prerequisite: ETE 2514C or ETE 2550C) This course is a study of the theory and 
application of electrical equipment used in the generation, transmission and 
distribution of electric power with emphasis on distribution equipment. 
(Generators, substation, aerial and underground power lines, transformers, 
regulators, capacitors, relays, etc.) 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

ETE 2550C DC AN D AC DYNAMOS 

(Prerequisite: ETE 1020) This course is a study of DC and AC motors and 
generators. Topics covered are electro-mechanical fundamentals, DC 
generators, DC motors, AC alternators, parallel operation, induction and syn- 
chronous motors, poly and single phase motors, 2 and 3 phase systems and 
transformers. 3-2-4* (offered Fall term and sufficient enrollment) 

ETE2633C LOGIC CIRCUITS 

There are no prerequisites; however, a knowledge of basic DC theory would be 
helpful. This course is a study of digital logic devices and systems included in 
SSI and MSI technology. Topics covered include number system; binary 
arithmatic; boolean algebra and theorems; Karnaugh maps and other reduction 
techniques; basic AND, OR, NOT, NAND, and NOR gates and FF's; counters; 
registers; arithmatic circuits; and multiplexors. In the lab, students construct 
logic blocks and small logic systems from the basic chips and test actual cir- 
cuits against theory. 3-2-4* (offered Winter term) 

ETE2680C MICROPROCESSORS 

(Prerequisite: ETE 2633C or permission of instructor) The microprocessor is 
rapidly taking over many of the functions previously done exclusively the "hard 
wired logic" methods dealt with in the prerequisite course ETE 2633C. This 
course deals with how microprocessor chips can be linked with appropriate 
peripheral IC's to accomplish any logic function from simple AND, OR, logic to 
the complexities of the general purpose digital computer. Emphasis will be on 
the use of the microprocessor as a controller rather than as a data processor. 
Topics covered include: the logic of the microprocessor chip, bussing, memory, 
programming, interfacing, A/D and D/A conversion, and device communications. 
The 8080 microprocessor trainers are provided in the lab. Students get hands-on 
experience programming and interfacing to actual equipment. 3-2-4* (offered 
Winter term) 

2 Q2» * Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



Engineering Technology 

ETG 1949 COOP: TECHNOLOGY I 

Co-Op Education in technology is a coordinated work-study program which 
reinforces the educational and professional growth of the student through 
parallel involvement in classroom studies and field experience in the student's 
chosen career. The student and teacher-coordinator determine the objectives 
for the on-the-job technology assignment. The student is then evaluated by the 
teacher-coordinator and the immediate supervisor according to those ob- 
jectives. 1-10-3* 

ETG 2530C PROPERTIES AND TESTING OF MATERIALS 

(Prerequisite: ETI 141 1C) Characteristics and physical properties of materials 
are investigated along with basic mechanics. The student receives instruction in 
the techniques and on the machines used for physical testing in industry. 
Topics covered include stress, strain, elasticity, types of failures, structure and 
application of ferrous and nonferrous metals, organic and inorganic materials 
and compounds. 3-2-4* (offered Fall term) 

ETG 2910 TECHNICAL PROBLEMS 

(Prerequisites: SUR 2610C, ETD 2121C, SUR 2330; or suitable experience) A 
guided self study into a specialty area of land surveying. Student has an option 
of stereo plotter operation, advanced drafting, control surveys and adjustments, 
sectional surveys, computer programming of surveying problems, or other 
approved specialties. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

ETG 2949 COOP: TECHNOLOGY II 

This is a continuation of ETG 1949. 1-10-3* 

Engineering Technology: Industrial 
ETI1411C MANUFACTURING PROCESSES 

This course is designed to provide a background of knowledge covering the 
various manufacturing materials and the fundamental types of manufacturing 
methods. Through lecture, demonstration, and practical applications the 
student is given the opportunity to become familiar with the various types of 
machine tools, tooling, measuring, and inspection procedures. Automation is 
introduced and information is presented to acquaint the student with the 
modern practices of numerical control for machine tools and the uses of tran- 
sfer and special machines. 2-2-3* (offered Winter term) 
Tl 2633 INDUSTRIAL RELATIONSHIPS 

In this course an effort is made to give the technology student a practical un- 
derstanding of union organization, industrial organization (both large and small), 
and employer-employee relationships. Information on acquiring and holding an 
"entry" position will be covered, including the writing of a "Personal Data 
Sheet" and techniques of applying for a job. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

Engineering Technology: Mechanical 

ETM 1101 INTRODUCTION TO SOLAR ENERGY 

A survey course designed to familiarize the student with the contributions of the 
sun's energy. Emphasis will be placed on solar developments prior to the ISIS, 
current practical application, emerging developments, and current status of the 
solar industry. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

ETM 1610 PRINCIPLES OF AIR CONDITIONING 

Psychometrics of air, calculations of heat loads and conditional air supply. 3-0- 
3* (offered Fall term) 

ETM 1612 HEATING AND VENTILATING 

A study of various types of heating and ventilating equipment for comfort 
heating; the selection and application of domestic and commercial components. 
3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

203 



Engineering Technology 

ETM 1613 PRINCIPLES OF REFRIGERATION 

A study of fundamental principles and their application to refrigeration and the 
component parts of basic commercial systems. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

ETM 1614C REFRIGERATION CYCLES AND EQUIPMENT 

(Prerequisite: ETE 1001C, ETM 1613C) Theory of operation of domestic and 
commercial refrigeration equipment. 2-2-3* (offered Winter term) 

ETM 2103 SOLAR RADIATION AND COLLECTORS 

(Prerequisites: ETM 1610, ETM 1613) Many factors affect the amount of solar 
energy that reaches the earth's surface. This course will study k available solar 
radiation and its relationship to the collecting process. 2-2-3* (offered Winter 
term) 

ETM 2633 COMMERCIAL REFRIGERATION SYSTEMS 

(Prerequisite: ETM 1614C) Commercial refrigeration systems and their related 
technical fields. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

ETM 2650C CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR REFRIGERATION 

(Prerequisite: ETM 1610C, ETM 1614C) Design, selection, application, and 

troubleshooting of refrigeration and air conditioning systems. 3-2-4* (offered 

. Fall term) 

ETM 2660C AIR DISTRIBUTION AND LAYOUT 

(Prerequisite: ETM 1610C, ETD 1501C) Fundamentals of air distribution, 
selection of components and accessories, design, planning, and layout of 
complete distribution systems, instrumentation, and system balancing. 2-4-4* 
(offered Winter term) 

ETM 2671 C REFRIGERATION EQUIPMENT FOR AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS 

(Prerequisite: ETM 2633) Installation, operation, balancing, and troubleshooting 
refrigeration problems in air conditioning. 2-2-3* (offered Winter term) 

ETM 2750C PLANNING OF AIR CONDITIONING SYSTEMS 

Practice in planning and estimating various types of air conditioning systems. 2- 
2-3* (offered Fall term) 

Fire Fighting and Protection 

FFP 1000 INTRODUCTION TO FIRE SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY 

Philosophy and history of fire service; organization and functions of local, 
county, state, federal, and private fire services; chemistry and physics of fire and 
theory of fire control. 3-0-3* 

FFP 1203 FIRE PREVENTION 

Organization and function of fire prevention; inspection, surveying and mapping 
procedures; recognition of fire hazards. Emphasis is on engineering a solution 
to fire hazards; enforcing fire prevention; public relations as affected by fire 
prevention. 3-0-3* 

FFP 1600 FIRE APPARATUS AND EQUIPMENT 

Fire protection organization and equipment; basic fire fighting tactics; public 
relations as affected by fire protection. 3-0-3* 

FFP 1640 FIRE HYDRAULICS 

Review of basic mathematics; hydraulic laws and formulas as applied to the fire 
service. Application of formulas and mental calculation to hydraulic problems. 
Underwriter requirements for pumps. 3-0-3* 

FFP 2100 FIRE ADMINISTRATION 

Fundamentals of fire department management including organization, manning 

schedules, management of personnel and resources, water supplies, tactics for 

multiple companies, training, communications, records and reports, public 

relations. American Insurance Association grading schedule, and maintenance 

of buildings and equipment. 3-0-3* 

j^ M * Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

204 



Engineering Technology 

TP 2240 FIRE INVESTIGATION AND ARSON DETECTION 

(Prerequisite: This course can only be given to members of the fire service and 
law enforcing agencies. Official identification necessary.) This course outlined 
to cover: detection of point or origin of fire, cause of fire and spread of fire. 
Course further covers report writing, interviewing, arson detection, collection 
and preservation of evidence. Also involves study of laws governing arson and 
courtroom procedure. 3-0-3* 

FP 2300 RELATED FIRE CODES AND ORDINANCES 

(Prerequisite: FFP 1200) Familiarization with national, state and focal laws and 
ordinances which influence the field of fire prevention and protection. 3-0-3* 

FP 2320 BUILDING CONSTRUCTION FOR FIRE PROTECTION 

Fundamental building construction and design; fire protection features; special 
considerations. 3-0-3* 

FP2500 HAZARDOUS MATERIALS (Will replace chemistry in Fire Science 
program) 
This course is a study of types of chemicals and processes, storage and tran- 
sportation of chemicals, hazards of radioactive materials and precautions to be 
taken in fire fighting involving hazardous materials. It is a review of federal, state 
and local laws pertaining to such materials. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

DS 2140 HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY I (Institutional Credit Only) 

Offered subject to permission of department chairperson. This independent 
study course acquaints the student with the creative forces which man has 
developed to control his environment. 1 credit hour, (offered upon demand) 
DS 2141 HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY II (Institutional Credit Only) 

(Prerequisite: IDS 2140) Offered subject to permission of department chair- 
person. This independent study course familiarizes the student with a number of 
transportation devices which have contributed to man's progress through the 
ages. 1-0-1 * (offered upon demand) 
)S 2142 HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY III (Institutional Credit Only) 

Offered subject to permission of department chairperson. This independent 
study course acquaints the student with man's search for food and its 
production. Students will learn how technology has improved the food supply of 
the world and contributed to the high standard of living enjoyed today. 2 credit 
hours (offered upon demand) 

Mathematics: Technology 

VITB1321 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I 

This course and MTB 1322 form a sequence to be offered to those technology 
majors who do not qualify for MAC 1104. Topics considered are as follows: 
standard notation and the slide rule, algebraic expressions and operations, 
dimensional analysis, linear equations in one unknown, linear equations, ex- 
ponents and radicals, quadratic equations, and exponentials and logarithms. 3- 
0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 
WITB1322 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II 

(Prerequisite: MTB 1321 or MAT 1003 or MAT 1002) This is the second course of 
the sequence offered to those technology majors who do not qualify for MAC 
1104. Topics included areas follows: trigonometry of right angles, computations 
involving right-triangle trigonometry, solution of oblique triangles, graphs of 
trigonometric functions, the j-operator, inverse trigonometric functions, 
binomial expansion and progressions, and selected topics in analytic geometry. 
3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

205 



Engineering Technology 

Engineering Technology: Civil 
SUR 1001 PROJECT LAYOUT 

A study of the elementary theory and practice of plane surveying including 
taping, differential and profile leveling, cross sectioning, earthwork computing, 
transit, stadia, and transit-tape surveying. 2-2-3* 

SUR2100C SURVEYING I 

(Co-requisite: MTB 1321) This course is an introduction to the profession of land 
surveying. It covers field measurement techniques; use of the surveyor's transit; 
taping procedures and leveling; notekeeping; note reduction; and associated 
computations. 2-4-4* 

SUR 2201 C SURVEYING III 

(Prerequisite: SUR 2100C, MTB 1322) This course is a study of elements of route 
surveying and design; transportation systems; reconnaissance; preliminary; 
location surveys; circular curves; vertical curves; spirals; earthwork; mass 
diagram; superelevation; and sight distances. 2-4-4* (offered Winter term) 

SUR2300C TOPOGRAPHY AND MAPPING 

(Prerequisite: SUR 2100C and ETD 2121 or suitable experience) A study of the 
field and drafting techniques of map construction; control surveys; detail 
surveys; transit-tape; transit-stadia; plane table; map drafting; contour con- 
struction; use of contour maps; cross section field work and drafting; earthwork 
computations; and map reproduction techniques. 2-3-3* (offered Fall term) 

SUR 2330 PHOTOGRAMMETRY 

(Prerequisite: SUR 2100C or suitable experience) A study of the geometrical 
characteristics of photographs and photogrammetric equipment; flight planning 
and control; photogrammetric measurements; rectification; radial line plotting; 
parallax measurements; and stereo plotter operation. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

SUR 2400 LEGAL ASPECTS OF SURVEYING 

(Prerequisite: SUR 2100C or suitable experience) A study of the legal principles 
of boundary location and professionalism; history of boundary surveys; sec- 
tional surveys; legal descriptions; property transfer; resurveys; subdivision 
plats; surveyor in court; and water boundaries. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

SUR 2402 LAND SURVEYING AND DESCRIPTIONS 

(Prerequisite: SUR 2400 and SUR 2610C or suitable experience) A study of the 
construction of land descriptions and techniques of surveying the boundaries of 
a described parcel of land; metes and bounds descriptions and surveys; lot and 
block descriptions and surveys; sectional descriptions and surveys; water 
boundary descriptions and surveys (including all associated computations). 3-0- 
3* (offered Winter term) 

SUR 2460 SUBDIVISIONS 

(Co- or prerequisite: ETD 2121C and SUR 2201C or suitable experience) A study 
of plat construction from tract description to final record plat; plat drafting; 
necessary computations; lettering; meaning of legal parts; and current plat laws 
and regulations. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

SUR 2500 ELECTRONIC AND GEODETIC SURVEYING 

(Prerequisite: SUR 2610C) EDM theory; calibration; state plane coordinates; 
practical astronomy, azimuth, time, latitude, line of position; least squares, 
applications. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

SUR2610C SURVEYING II 

(Prerequisite: SUR 2100C, MTB 1322) Errors and error analysis; precision 
specifications design; traverse computations; adjustment methods; area; 
missing elements; line and curve intersections; precise leveling; angle and 
distance measurements. 2-4-4* (offered Fall term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
206 



Library 




FACULTY: 



Library 

Foster, 



Richardson, Roberts, 



Douglass (Director), 

Thomas, Wade 
MAJOR: Librarian (University Parallel) 
COURSE PREFIXES: LIS 
PROGRAMS: 

LIBRARIAN (A. A. 15-352) 

Students interested in a career as a Librarian, and transfer to a four-year college or 
university, will complete Associate in Arts program arranged in consultation with 
members of the staff. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

"LIS 1580 CHILDREN'S LITERATURE 

This course relates children's needs and interests to appropriate book materials 
for their fulfillment. Sources and uses of materials are stressed. This Per- 
sonalized System of Instruction Course is given through the Library Learning 
Resources Center. Premission of Library Director. (3 credit hours) 
PERSONALIZED SYSTEM OF INSTRUCTION 
The following Personalized System of Instruction courses are given through the 
Library Learning Resources Center and are described in the catalog under their 
respective departmental designations: 

ENG2910 — Introduction to Research I — Communications 
ENG2911 — Introduction to Research II — Communications 
ENG2912 — Introduction to Research III — Communications 
IDS 2140 — History of Technology I — Engineering Technology 
IDS 2141 — History of Technology II — Engineering Technology 
History of Technology III — Engineering Technology 
Children's Literature — Library Learning Resources Center 
Students may enroll in these courses with the permission of the registrar at any time 
within the first eight (8) weeks of a regular term and the first three (3) weeks of the 
Spring or Summer term. 

207 



IDS 2142 — 
LIS 1580 - 



Mathematics 



Mathematics 



FACULTY: Wing (Chairperson), Alber, Evans, Foley, Hamlin, 
Hendrix, Hitchcock, Langston, Shaw, Sweet, Travis 
(Assistant Chairperson), Van Wyhe. PBJC North, Barton, 
Still. PBJC South, Suttle, Terhune. PBJC Glades, 
Campbell. 

MAJORS: Mathematician, Mathematics Teacher 

COURSE PREFIXES: COP, MAC, MAP, MAT, MGF, MTB, STA 

PROGRAMS: 

MATHEMATICIAN (A.A. 11-251) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



COURSE 

ARH 1000 

or 
MUL1011 
ENC1103 
ENC1136 
FRE1100 
FRE1101 
MAC 2411 
MAC 2412 
COP 21 10 
SOC 1200 
POS1001* 



FRE 2200 
FRE2201 
HES1000** 
MAC 2413 
MAP 2302 
STA 2014 
PHY 2048 
PHY 2048L 
PHY 2049 
PHY 2049L 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 



TITLE Fall 

Art Appreciation 3 

Music Appreciation (3) 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 

Elementary French 1 3 

Elementary French II 

Calculus I 3 

Calculus II 

Mathematical Programming 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Introduction to Political Science 

Physical Education 1 

16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Literature 3 

Intermediate French 1 3 

Intermediate French II 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Calculus III 4 

Differential Equations 

Statistics 

General Physics with Calculus I 3 

General Physics with Calculus I Lab 1 

General Physics with Calculus II 

General Physics with Calculus II Lab 

Elective 



16 



Winter 



16 



16 



'POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
'HES2121 may be substituted. 



208 



Mathematics 

MATHEMATICS TEACHER (A.A. 11-253) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE Fall Winter 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

EDF 1005 Introduction to Education 3 

MAC 2411 Calculus I 3 

MAC 2412 Calculus II 3 

COP 2110 Mathematical Programming 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

16 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Literature 3 

HES 1000** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAC 2413 Calculus III 4 

MAP 2302 Differential Equations 3 

STA 2014 Statistics 3 

PHY 2048 General Physics with Calculus I 3 

PHY2048L General Physics with Calculus I Lab 1 

PHY 2049 General Physics with Calculus II 3 

PHY2049L General Physics with Calculus II Lab 1 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

Electives 6 

16 16 

*POS2041 orAMH 2010 may be substituted. 
*HES2121 may be substituted. 

MATH LEARNING CENTER 

The multimedia systems learning center is open to all students. Programmed material, 
tapes, filmstrips, 8 mm, films and other devices covering various levels of mathematics 
are available to fit student's individual needs. Many mini-computers are in the learning 
center to aid the student with computations. A number of mathematics course of- 
ferings can be taken in the center by registering for MAT 1002. 



209 



Mathematics 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Computer Programming 

COP 2110 MATHEMATICAL PROGRAMMING 

(Prerequisite: MAC 1104 or higher) This course introduces the student to 
flowcharting techniques and to the programming of mathematical problems in 
Fortran IV. Emphasis is on the algorithmic approach. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter 
& Spring) 

Mathematics 

MAT 1002 DEVELOPMENTAL MATH** 

All students taking a math course in the Math Learning Center must register for 
MAT 1002. All programs in the Learning Center are self-study, individualized to 
student needs. Depending upon the programs and achievement, the student 
may earn up to 3 hours credit in one semester. 3-0-3*t (offered all terms) 

MAT 1003 BASIC ARITHMETIC (Institutional Credit Only) 

This module will review and reinforce basic arithmetic principles. A pre-testing 
program will determine the level at which the student begins his study. Topics 
for students in various fields of study are introduced in this module. 1-0-1' 
(offered all terms in MCL only) 

MAT 1013 PREPARATORY ALGEBRA (Institutional Credit Only) 

This second module of Developmental Math is designed for the student with 
little or no background in algebra. Study will include operations of basic algebra 
— signed numbers, exponents, algebraic functions, etc. 1-0-1* (offered all terms 
in MLConly) 

MAT 1014 INTRODUCTION TO MODERN MATH (Institutional Credit Only) 

Basic concepts of set theory, number structure and numeration will be covered 
in this third module. Students going totheMGF 1113 program will also cover the 
real numbers. Students going to the MAT 1033 program will cover additional 
topics in algebra. 1-0-1 * (offered all terms in MLC only) 

MAT 1033 INTERMEDIATE ALGEBRA 

(Prerequisite: One year of high school algebra or its equivalent and adequate 
score on placement test). This course is designed to prepare the student for 
MAC 1104. Topics included are sets, properties of real numbers, linear 
equations and inequalities, exponents and radicals, quadratic equations and 
graphing in the plane. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

Mathematics: Applied 

MAP 2302 DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS 

(Prerequisite: MAC 2413) Topics included are ordinary differential equations 
with applications, the Laplace transform, differential operators systems of 
equations, orthogonal trajectories, electric networks and inverse transforms. 3- 
0-3* (offered Winter & Spring terms) 

Mathematics: Calculus and Precalculus 
MAC 1104 COLLEGE ALGEBRA 

(Prerequisite: MAT 1033 or adequate score on placement test and two years of 
high school algebra) Topics included are relations and functions, systems of 
equations, matrices, determinants, quadratic equations and inequalities, ex- 
ponential and logarithmic functions. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

**A student registered for MAT 1002 may earn credit in any of the following regular 

math courses: MGF 1113, MAT 1033, MAC 1104 or MAC 1144. 

fStudents who need additional work may enroll in MAT 060. Please see instructor for 

information on Mathematics Workshop. 

* LeCture-Lab-Credit Hours 

210 



Mathematics 

IAAC1144 TRIGONOMETRY AND ANALYTIC GEOMETRY 

(Prerequisite: MAC 1 104 or adequate score on placement test) This is a study of 
the trigonometric functions of angles and real numbers, trigonometric identities 
and equations, solutions of right and oblique triangles, complex numbers and 
plane analytic geometry. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

l/l AC 2411 CALCULUS I 

(Prerequisite: MAC 1144 or adequate score on placement test and high school 
trigonometry) This is the first of a three-term sequence. Topics included are 
functions, derivatives and integration of algebraic functions, trigonometric 
functions, logs and exponential functions, and vectors in the plane. 3-0-3* (of- 
fered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

/I AC 2412 CALCULUS II 

(Prerequisite: MAC 2411) This is the second of a three-term sequence. Topics 
included are limits and continuity, techniques of integration, applications, and 
polar coordinates. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Summer terms) 

MAC 2413 CALCULUS III 

(Prerequisite: MAC 2412) This is the third of a three-term sequence. Topics in- 
cluded are curve sketching and vectors in three dimensions, partial dif- 
ferentiation, multiple integration and infinite series. 4-0-4* (offered Fall & Winter 
terms) 

l/lathematics: General and Finite 

l/IGF 1113 GENERAL EDUCATION MATHEMATICS I 

(Prerequisite: Adequate score on placement test or permission of Department 

Chairperson) Credit: 1, 2, or 3 semester hours. A student may select the regular 

three-hour course which will cover the basic concepts of logic, mathematical 

systems, systems of numeration and a development of the real number system. 

OR he may select 1, 2, or 3 of the following modules for one-hour credit each: 

(offered all terms) 

MODULE A: FINITE MATHEMATICAL SYSTEMS 

This module examines the basic principles and the logical structure 
underlying mathematics through the study of clock arithmetic and other 
abstract systems. 

MODULE B: USE OF ELECTRONIC CALCULATORS 

This module acquaints the student with the various types of calculators 
on the market, the way they operate, and shows the student how to use 
the calculators most effectively. 

MODULE C: HISTORY OF MATHEMATICS 

This module follows the development of mathematics through the ages, 
including a study of the contributions that mathematics have made to 
music, art, science and other aspects of our culture. 

MODULE D: OUR NUMBER SYSTEM 

This module is a study of the development of the basic structure and 
properties of our complex number system, including counting numbers, 
whole numbers, integers, rational numbers and real numbers. 

MODULE E: MATHEMATICAL LOGIC 

This module involves an analysis of sentence structure and truth values 
and includes a study of valid and invalid arguments and methods of proof. 

MODULE F: GEOMETRY 

This module is a study of the relationship of plane and solid figures, 
distances, areas and volumes and includes measurement and con- 
struction. 
* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

211 



Mathematics 

MODULE G: PROBABILITY 

This module is a study of the fundamental laws of probability and in- 
cludes permutations, combinations and sample spaces. 
MODULE H: INTRODUCTION TO ALGEBRA 

This module serves as an introduction to the basic concepts of algebra 
; including the solution of simple linear equations and graphing. (Not 

recommended for students who have had more than 1 year of high school 

algebra). 
MODULE I: CONSUMER MATHEMATICS 

This module is a study of practical mathematics with applications to daily 

living. 
MODULE J: THE METRIC SYSTEM 

This module is a study of the basic units of measurement in the metric 

system, including conversion of units. 
MODULE K: RATIO AND PROPORTION 

This module is a study of ratio, proportion and variation, fractions, 

decimals and percents with applications. 
MGF 1114 GENERAL EDUCATION MATHEMATICS II 

(Prerequisite: 3 semester hours credit in MGF 1113) This course also may be 
taken for 1, 2, or 3 hours credit. A student may select 1, 2, or 3 of the above 
modules for which he does not have credit in MGF 1113. (offered all terms) 

Mathematics: Technology and Business 

MTB 1 103 BUSINESS MATHEMATICS (Taught in Business Department) 

This course includes information and practice in practical business situations 
involving: bank and sales records, business percentages, financial charges, 
payrolls and taxes, statistics and computers, financial statements, insurance, 
bonds, stocks and annuities. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

MTB 1321 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS I (Taught in Engineering Department) 

This course and MTB 1322 form a sequence to be offered to those technology 
majors who do not qualify for MAC 1104. Topics considered are as follows: 
standard notation and the slide rule, algebraic expressions and operations, 
dimensional analysis, linear equations, exponents and radicals, quadratic 
equations, and exponentials and logarithms. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

MTB 1322 TECHNICAL MATHEMATICS II (Taught in Engineering Department) 

(Prerequisite: MTB 1321 or MAT 1003 or MAT 1002) This is the second course of 
the sequence offered to those technology majors who do not qualify for MAC 
1 104. Topics included are as follows: trigonometry of right angles, computations 
involving right-triangle trigonometry, solution of oblique triangles, graphs of 
trigonometric functions, the j-operator, inverse trigonometric functions, 
binomial expansion and progressions, and selected topics in analytic geometry. 
3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

Statistics 

STA2014 STATISTICS 

(Prerequisite: MAT 1033 or higher OR permission of Math Department) This 
course considers statistics and probability from the standpoint of general ap- 
plication. Topics included are as follows: frequency distribution, measures of 
central tendency, measures of dispersion, binomial distribution, standardized 
normal distribution, hyper-geometric distribution, poisson distribution, the chi- 
square distribution, central limit theorem, statistical inference, hypothesis 
testing, confidence limits, correlation coefficient, regression, sample space, 
permutations, combinations, probability, and expectation. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, 
Winter & Spring terms) * Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

212 



Music 




FACULTY: 



MAJORS: 



Music 

Royce (Chairperson), Albee, Gross, Jones, Johnson, 
McClay, Pryweller 

Music (A. A.), Music (A.S.), Popular Music and Jazz (A.S.), 
Popular Music and Jazz (Certified Program) 



COURSE PROGRAMS: MUE, MUH, MUL, MUM, MUN, MUS, MUT, 

MVB, MVK, MVP, MVS, MVV, MVW 
PROGRAMS: 

MUSIC, MUSIC EDUCATION (A.A. 12-276) 

rhis curriculum is designed for students who plan to work for the Baccalaureate 
Degree in Applied Music, Music Composition, Music Education, Music History and 
Literature, Music Merchandising, Musicology, Music Theory, Music Therapy or Sacred 
Music. 

Students who do not pass a piano proficiency examination should enroll in a piano 
3lass. Composition and Music Education Majors should add MUE 2460, MUE 2450, 
MUE 2440 and MUE 2470. Music majors participate in at least one college music en- 
semble each semester. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

MUS 001 1 Seminar in Music 

MUT1111 Music Theory I 3 

MUT 1112 Music Theory II 3 

MUT 1241 Sight Singing I 1 

MUT 1242 Sight Singing II 1 

Applied Music 4 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

5OC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Physical Education 2 

Science 3 

,31 

Paiffl ueacft Junior College 213 

i ihraru 



Music 

MUSIC, MUSIC EDUCATION (Cont'd) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Applied Music 4 

MUH2111 Introduction to Music History 3 

MUS0011 Seminar in Music 

MUT2116 Music Theory III 3 

MUT2117 Music Theory IV 3 

MUT 2231 Keyboard Harmony I 1 

MUT 2232 Keyboard Harmony II 1 

MUT 2246 Sight Singing III 1 

MUT 2247 Sight Singing IV 1 

MGF 1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

PSC 1513 Survey of Physical Science I 3 

Literature 3 

General Education Electives 8 

34 
"HES2121 may be substituted. 
**POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
NOTE: The General Education requirements allow a student to earn his six hours of 
science credits by selecting offerings from the areas of Biology, Chemistry, Physics, 
or Physical Science on the advice of the student's major counselor. 

MUSIC (A.S. 12-278) 

This is a two-year technical program for students not planning to pursue a four-year 
college curriculum in music. It offers a basic program of studies designed to assist 
those engaged in teaching, performing, or conducting music. Music majors participate 
in at least one college music ensemble each semester. 
Students who are not proficient in piano should enroll in a piano class. The nonmusic 
electives in the program may be selected so as to benefit the student in his particular 
area of specialization, such as sacred music or private teaching. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

Applied Music 4 

MUS0011 Seminar in Music 

MUT 1001 Music Fundamentals .*. 3 

ENC1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

POS 1001 * Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Physical Education 2 

Electives -. 7 

31 

*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



214 



Music 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Applied Music 4 

S/IUH 2111 Introduction to Music History 3 

V1US0011 Seminar in Music 

y/IUT 1111 MusicTheoryl 3 

WUT1112 Music Theory II 3 

vlUT 1241 Sight Singing I 1 

MUT1242 Sight Singing II 1 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL1011 Music Appreciation (3) 

HES 1000** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

PSY2012 General Psychology 3 

Electives* * * 8 



HES 2121 may be substituted. 

Six hours of MUS 1949 and MUS 2949 may be substituted. 



31 



"Six 



POPULAR MUSIC AND JAZZ (A.S. 12-279) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

Applied Music 4 

Music Ensemble 2 

MUH 2016 Jazz Orientation 2 

MUS 001 1 Seminar in Music 

MUT1111 MusicTheoryl 3 

MUT1112 Music Theory II 3 

MUT 1241 Sight Singing I 1 

MUT1242 Sight Singing II 1 

MVV1111 Class Voice 1 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

Physical Education 2 

Electives* * * 6 



31 



***Six hours of MUS 1949 and MUS 2949 may be substituted. 



215 



Music 

POPULAR MUSIC AND JAZZ (Cont'd) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Applied Music 4 

Music Ensemble 2 

MUH2111 Introduction to Music History 3 

MUS 001 1 Seminar in Music 

MUT 1351 Jazz Arranging I 2 

MUT1352 Jazz Arranging II 2 

MUT2116 MusicTheoryl 3, 

MUT 2231 Keyboard Harmony 1 

MUT 2246 Sight Singing I 1 

MUT 2641 Instrumental Improvisation 1 

or 

MUM 2031 Pop Vocal Style I (1) 

MVS1116 ClassGuitar 1 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science , .- 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Electives* * * 3 

31 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
* * POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

POPULAR MUSIC AND JAZZ (One Year Certificate Program) (CT 120280) 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

Applied Music 4 

Music Ensemble 2 

MUH2016 Jazz Orientation 2 

MUH2111 Introduction to Music History 3 

MUS 001 1 Seminar in Music 

MUT1111 MusicTheoryl 3 

MUT 1112 Music Theory II 3 

MUT 1241 Sight Singing I 1 

MUT 1242 Sight Singing II ... 1 

MUT1351 Jazz Arranging I 2 

MUT 2641 Instrumental Improvisation - 1 

or 

MUM 2031 Pop Vocal Style I (1) 

MVV1111 Class Voice 1 

Electives* 9 

32 
*Six hours of MUS 1949 and MUS 2949 may be substituted. 



216 



Music 

lURSE DESCRIPTIONS 
sic — Applied — Class Instruction 
ISIC — APPLIED — KEYBOARD 
'K1111A CLASS INSTRUCTION I 

This course provides class lessons for beginning piano students. Instruction 
includes elementary technical exercises for developing keyboard facility and 
music reading. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall & Winter terms) 
K 1 1 1 1 B CLASS INSTRUCTION II 

(Prerequisite: MVK 11 11 A or equivalent) This course is a continuation of MVK 
1 1 1 1 A. 0-2-1 * (offered on demand) 

ISIC - APPLIED - STRINGS 

S1116A CLASS INSTRUCTION, GUITAR I 

This course provides class lessons for beginning students. Instruction includes 
elementary technical exercises, fundamental chords, chord progression, 
playing folk music, simple accompaniments and music reading. Students must 
furnish their own instruments. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall & Winter terms) 
S 1116B CLASS INSTRUCTION, GUITAR II 

This course is designed for the student who has an elementary playing facility 
on the guitar. Instruction is given in playing of bar chords, jazz chords, im- 
provisation, sight reading and ensemble playing. Students must furnish their 
own instruments. 0-2-1 * (offered on demand) 

SIC - APPLIED - VOICE 
M 2031 POP VOCAL STYLE I 

(Prerequisite: MUT 1111 or equivalent) This course is a study of various vocal 
styles of jazz and popular music. Included will be analyses of the singing of 
outstanding vocal stylists and methods for the students' technical development 
in this idiom. 0-2-1 * (offered upon demand) 

V 1111 A CLASS INSTRUCTION, VOICE I 

This course includes instruction in tone production, diction, music reading and 
repertory. Each student is given opportunity for individual aid. 0-2-1* (offered 
Fall & Winter terms) 

V1111B CLASS INSTRUCTION, VOICE II 

(Prerequisite: MVV 1111 A or equivalent) This is a continuation of MVV 1111A. 0- 
2-1 * (offered on demand) 

y be repeated for credit to the maximum listed under the course descriptions. 

sic — Applied — Private Instruction 

3 letter R will be added to the common' course number for each applied music 
irse to indicate that credit may be earned one, two, or three times in each course. 

sic — Applied — Preparatory — Freshman Level** 

i/ate instruction — one half-hour lesson a week. The course is designed for non- 
sic majors who need applied music as a part of their course requirements and for 
sic majors who are below freshman level of performance. Credit earned will not 
)ly to the requirement of the music major. Maximum credit: 3 semester hours. 0-V2- 



ecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

217 



Music 



Instruction is available in the following: 



MUSIC: 


APPLIED-BRASSES 


MUSIC: 


MVB1011 


APPLIED MUSIC TRUMPET 


MVP 1011 


MVB1012 


APPLIED MUSIC HORN 




MVB1013 


APPLIED MUSIC TROMBONE 




MVB1014 


APPLIED MUSIC 


MUSIC: 




BARITONE HORN 


MVS1011 


MVB1015 


APPLIED MUSIC TUBA 


MVS1012 
MVS1013 


MUSIC: 


APPLIED-KEYBOARD 


MVS1014 


MVK1011 


APPLIED MUSIC PIANO 





MVK1013 



(Prerequisite: MVK 1111- 
2121 Class Piano 
or equivalent) 
APPLIED MUSIC ORGAN 



MUSIC: APPLIED-VOICE 

MVV1011 APPLIED MUSIC VOICE 
(Prerequisite: MVV 1111- 
(Class Voice or equivalent) 



MVS1016 



MUSIC: 

MVW1011 
MVW1012 
MVW1013 

MVW1014 

MVW1015 



APPLIED— PERCUSSION 

APPLIED MUSIC PE 
CUSSION 



APPLIED-STRINGS 

APPLIED MUSIC VIOLIN 
APPLIED MUSIC VIOLA 
APPLIED MUSIC CELLO 
APPLIED MUSIC STRING 
BASS 

APPLIED MUSIC GUITAR 
(Prerequisite: MVS 
1116 — Class Guitar or 
equivalent) 

APPLIED-WOODWINDS 

APPLIED MUSIC FLUTE 
APPLIED MUSIC OBOE 
APPLIED MUSIC 
CLARINET 
APPLIED MUSIC 
BASSOON 

APPLIED MUSIC 
SAXOPHONE 



Music Applied — Secondary Instrument — Freshman Level** 

Private Instruction — one half-hour lesson a week. The course is designed for studen 

whose curriculum requires study of a secondary instrument. Maximum credit: thr 

semester hours. 0-V2-1 * 

Instruction is available in the following: 

MUSIC: APPLIED-BRASSES 

MVB1211 APPLIED MUSIC TRUMPET 

MVB1212 APPLIED MUSIC HORN 

MVB 1213 APPLIED MUSIC TROMBONE 

MVB1214 APPLIED MUSIC BARITONE 

HORN 
MVB 1215 APPLIED MUSIC TUBA 

MUSIC: APPLIED— KEYBOARD 

MVK 1211 APPLIED MUSIC PIANO 
MVK 1213 APPLIED MUSIC ORGAN 

MUSIC: APPLIED— PERCUSSION 

MVP1211 APPLIED MUSIC PER- 
CUSSION 



**A special fee of $30.00 is required. 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

218 



MUSIC: 


APPLIED-STRINGS 


MVS 1211 


APPLIED MUSIC VIOLIN 


MVS 1212 


APPLIED MUSIC VIOLA 


MVS 1213 


APPLIED MUSIC CELLO 


MVS 1214 


APPLIED MUSIC STRING 




BASS 


MVS 1216 


APPLIED MUSIC GUITAR 


MVS 1217 


APPLIED MUSIC BASS 




GUITAR 


MUSIC: 


APPLIED-VOICE 


MVV 1211 


APPLIED MUSIC VOICE 


MUSIC: 


APPLIED-WOODWINDS 


MVW1211 


APPLIED MUSIC FLUTE 


MVW1212 


APPLIED MUSIC OBOE 


MVW1213 


APPLIED MUSIC CLARINET 


MVW1214 


APPLIED MUSIC BASSOOls 


MVW1215 


APPLIED MUS 




SAXOPHONE 



jsic — Applied — Principal Instrument - 

vate Instruction — two one-half hou 
:hniques and literature of the applied 
struction and seminars. Maximum credit: 



JSIC: 

/B1311 
/B1312 
/B1313 
/B1314 



APPLIED— BRASSES 

APPLIED MUSIC TRUMPET 
APPLIED MUSIC HORN 
APPLIED MUSIC TROMBONE 
APPLIED MUSIC 
BARITONE 



HORN 

/B1315 APPLIED MUSIC TUBA 
A special fee of $60.00 is required. 

JSIC: APPLIED-STRINGS 

^S 1311 APPLIED MUSIC VIOLIN 

fS1312 APPLIED MUSIC VIOLA 

fS1313 APPLIED MUSIC CELLO 



fS1314 



APPLIED MUSIC STRING 
BASS 



Music 

■ Freshman Level** 

r lessons a week. The course presents 
music area, administered through private 
six semester hours. 0-1-2* 
MUSIC: APPLIED— KEYBOARD 

MVK1311 APPLIED MUSIC PIANO 
MVK 1313 APPLIED MUSIC ORGAN 

MUSIC: APPLIED— PERCUSSION 

MVP1311 APPLIED MUSIC PER- 
CUSSION 



MUSIC: APPLIED— WOODWINDS 

MVW 131 1 APPLIED MUSIC FLUTE 
MVW1312 APPLIED MUSIC OBOE 
MVW 1313 APPLIED MUSIC 

CLARINET 
MVW 1314 APPLIED MUSIC 

BASSOON 
MVW1315 APPLIED MUSIC 

SAXOPHONE 



fS1316 APPLIED MUSIC GUITAR 



JSIC: 

W1311 



APPLIED— VOICE 

APPLIED MUSIC VOICE 



isic — Applied — Secondary Instrument - 

vate Instruction — one half-hour lesson 

urs. 0-V2-1* 

truction is available in the following: 



ISIC: 


APPLIED— BRASSES 


MUSIC: 


>B 2221 


APPLIED MUSIC TRUMPET 


MVS 2221 


fB 2222 


APPLIED MUSIC HORN 


MVS 2222 


<B 2223 


APPLIED MUSIC TROMBONE 


MVS 2223 


IB 2224 


APPLIED MUSIC 


MVS 2224 




BARITONE HORN 


MVS 2226 


fB 2225 


APPLIED MUSIC TUBA 


MVS 2227 


ISIC: 


APPLIED— KEYBOARD 


MUSIC: 


'K2221 


APPLIED MUSIC PIANO 


MVV 2221 



IK 2223 APPLIED MUSIC ORGAN 

ISIC: APPLIED— PERCUSSION 

rP2221 APPLIED MUSIC PER- 
CUSSION 



\ special fee of $30.00 is required. 
5Cture-Lab-Credit Hours 



- Sophomore Level** 

a week. Maximum credit: three semester 



APPLIED— STRINGS 

APPLIED MUSIC VIOLIN 

APPLIED MUSIC VIOLA 

APPLIED MUSIC CELLO 

APPLIED MUSIC STRING 

BASS 

APPLIED MUSIC GUITAR 

APPLIED MUSIC GUITAR 

APPLIED— VOICE 

APPLIED MUSIC VOICE 



MUSIC: APPLIED— WOODWINDS 

MVW 2221 APPLIED MUSIC FLUTE 

MVW 2222 APPLIED MUSIC OBOE 

MVW 2223 APPLIED MUSIC CLARINET 

MVW 2224 APPLIED MUSIC BASSOON 

MVW2225 APPLIED MUSIC 

SAXOPHONE 



219 



Music 

Music — Applied — Principal Instrument — Sophomore 

Private Instruction — two one half-hour lessons a week, 
hours. 0-1-2* 

MUSIC: APPLIED-BRASSES MUSIC: 

MVB2321 APPLIED MUSIC TRUMPET MVP 2321 



MVB2322 APPLIED MUSIC HORN 
MVB 2323 APPLIED MUSIC TROMBONE 
MVB2324 APPLIED MUSIC 

BARITONE 

HORN 
MVB 2325 APPLIED MUSIC TUBA 

MUSIC: APPLIED— KEYBOARD 

MVK2321 APPLIED MUSIC PIANO 
MVK2323 APPLIED MUSIC ORGAN 

**A special fee of $60.00 is required. 

MUSIC: APPLIED VOICE 

MVV2321 APPLIED MUSIC VOICE 



MUSIC: 

MVS 2321 
MVS 2322 
MVS 2323 
MVS 2324 

MVS 2326 



Level** 

Maximum credit: six semest< 

APPLIED-PERCUSSION 

APPLIED MUSIC PEF1 
CUSSION 



APPLIED— STRINGS 

APPLIED MUSIC VIOLIN 

APPLIED MUSIC VIOLA 

APPLIED MUSIC CELLO 

APPLIED MUSIC STRING 

BASS 

APPLIED MUSIC GUITAR 



MUSIC: APPLIED-WOODWINDS 

MVW2321 APPLIED MUSIC FLUTE 
MVW2322 APPLIED MUSIC OBOE 
MVW2323 APPLIED MUSIC 

CLARINET 
MVW2324 APPLIED MUSIC 

BASSOON 
MVW2325 APPLIED 

SAXOPHONE 



MUS 



* * A special fee of $60.00 is required. 

Music Education 

MUE2440 STRING TECHNIQUES 

This course provides basic instruction in string instruments. Music Educatu 
majors are required to have instruction in one of the following: (offered up< 
demand) 

A. Violin 

B. Viola 

C. Cello 

D. String Bass. 0-2-1* 
MUE2450 WOODWIND TECHNIQUES 

This course provides basic class instruction in woodwind instruments. Mu: 
Education majors are required to have instruction in one of the following: ( 
fered upon demand) 

A. Clarinet 

B. Flute 

C. Saxophone. 0-2-1* 
MUE2460 BRASS TECHNIQUES 

This course provides basic class instruction in brass instruments. Mu: 
Education majors are required to have instruction in one of the following: ( 
fered upon demand) 

A. Trumpet 

B. French Horn 

C. Trombone 

D. Tuba. 0-2-1* 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hoi 



220 



Music 

JE2470 PERCUSSION TECHNIQUES 

This course provides class instruction in the basic percussion instruments and 
is required of Music Education majors. 0-2-1 * (offered upon demand) 

isic: History/Musicology 

JH 2016 JAZZ ORIENTATION (Institutional Credit Only) 

This course offers the student an introduction to jazz by means of examining 
jazz music and its performers, essentials of its style, and basic concepts in jazz 
improvisation. 2-0-2* (offered Fall term) 
JH 2111 INTRODUCTION TO MUSIC HISTORY 

This course is designed for the music major and is an introduction to music 
history and literature. It includes a program of listening with the use of recorded 
music and scores. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

isic: Music Literature 

JL 1011 MUSIC APPRECIATION 

This course is a survey of the historical periods of music development. It in- 
cludes a study of styles, forms, and composers and their works. It is designed to 
provide the student with a basis for intelligent listening and to help the student 
develop a more thorough understanding of music. Course offers credit in 
General Education for non-music majors. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 
JL1955 APPRECIATION OF MUSIC (FOREIGN STUDY) 

This course is a survey of the historical periods of cultural development. It in- 
cludes a study of music styles, forms, composers, and their works. It is 
designed to provide the student with a basis of intelligent listening and to help 
him to develop a more thorough understanding of music by hearing live per- 
formances and observing the musical and cultural life of foreign countries. 
Examinations and written reports are required based on observations and 
listening experiences witnessed abroad. This course may be substituted for 
MUL1011. A special fee is charged, (offered upon demand) 3-0-3* 

isic: Ensembles** 

3 letter R will be added to the common course number for each music ensemble to 

icate that credit may be earned one, two, three, or four times in each course. 

IN 1120 CONCERT BAND 

Any qualified student who enjoys the study and performances of standard 
concert band literature is eligible to enroll for credit or audit. Some band in- 
struments are available for student use. 0-3-1 * * * (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

N 1210 CONCERT ORCHESTRA 

This organization provides the opportunity for experience in the playing of 
various types of orchestral literature. All qualified student is eligible to enroll for 
credit or audit with permission of the department. 0-3-1*** (offered Fall & Winter 
terms) 

N1310 CONCERT CHORUS 

Membership is open to all students. Students participate in the study and 
performance of varied repertory of choral music. Both accompanied and a 
cappella works are included. Students may enroll for credit or audit. 0-3-1*** 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

IOTE: A maximum of 4 semester hours credit in MUN courses may be applied 
rard the A. A. degree. Credit received for participation may be in addition to normal 
demic load. 

icture-Lab-Credit Hours 

221 



Music 

MUN 1492A GUITAR ENSEMBLE 

(Prerequisite: MVS 1116 and MVS 1117 or equivalent) This course is designed t 
give the student an opportunity to play in guitar ensembles ranging from duet 
to octets. The music will be taken from classical and jazz literature. Members ar 
selected by audition. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

MUN 1492B GUITAR ENSEMBLE 

This course is a continuation of MUN 1492A. 0-2-1 * 

MUN 1710 JAZZ ENSEMBLE 

This organization provides opportunities for the student to become acquainte 
with the techniques and styles of contemporary popular music and jaz; 
Members are selected by audition. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

MUN 1720 PACESETTERS 

This organization provides a selected group of vocal performers with ir 
strumental accompanists, opportunities to perform contemporary sounds c 
folk, pop, jazz and rock music. Members are selected by audition. 0-2-1 * (offere 
Fall & Winter terms) 

MUS0011 SEMINAR IN MUSIC 

Music majors meet together one hour a week each semester to attend lecture? 
workshops, film showings, artists' performances and student recitals. Th 
seminar programs are planned to supplement the required music curriculun 
Attendance and participation is a requirement of students enrolled in applie 
music courses. 1-0-0* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

MUS1949 COOP: MUSIC I 

Co-Op Education in music is a coordinated work-study program which reii 
forces the educational and professional growth of the student through paralU 
involvement in classroom studies and field experience in the student's chose 
career. The student and teacher-coordinator determine the objectives for the oi 
the-job music assignment. The student is then evaluated by the teache 
coordinator and the immediate supervisor according to those objectives. 1-10-3 

MUS 2949 COOP: MUSIC II 

This is a continuation of MUS 1949. 1-10-3* 

Music: Theory 

MUT1001 FUNDAMENTALS OF MUSIC 

This is an introductory course in basic music skills for those interested in mus 
fundamentals. The course includes the study of notation, rhythm, singing, bas 
piano skills and conducting. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 
MUT1111 MUSICTHEORYI 

(Co-requisite: MUT 1241) This course includes study of the melodic, harmon 
and rhythmic elements of music through part writing and music analysis. Th 
harmonic material is limited to the principal diatonic structures. This is 
university parallel course for students majoring in music. 3-0-3* (offered Fall 
Winter terms) 

**A maximum of 4 semester hours credit may be applied toward the A.A. Degre 
Credit received for participation may be in addition to normal academic load. 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
222 



Music 

T1112 MUSIC THEORY II 

(Prerequisite: MUT 1111 or equivalent. Co-requisite: MUT 1242) This course is a 
continuation of MUT 1111, Music Theory and includes the study of additional 
diatonic triads, non-harmonic tones, and diatonic seventh chords. 3-0-3* (offered 
Winter & Spring terms) 

T1241 EAR TRAINING & SIGHT SINGING I 

This course includes aural dictation and provides a practical approach to sight 
singing techniques, including pitch and rhythmic reading, with emphasis on 
diatonic materials. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

F1242 EAR TRAINING & SIGHT SINGING II 

(Prerequisite: MUT 1241 or equivalent) This course is a continuation of MUT 
1241. 0-2-1 * (offered Winter & Spring terms) 

T 1351 JAZZ ARRANGING I 

(Prerequisite: MUT 1111 or equivalent) This course is a study of arranging music 
in the popular and jazz idom. Students will write arrangements for a variety of 
instrumental combinations for evaluation in class. 2-0-2* (offered upon demand) 

T1352 JAZZ ARRANGING II 

(Prerequisite: MUT 1351 or equivalent) This course is a continuation of MUT 
1351. 2-0-2* (offered upon demand) 

2116 MUSIC THEORY III 

(Prerequisite: MUT 1112 or equivalent. Co-requisite: MUT 2246) This course is a 
continuation of MUT 1112, Music Theory, and includes the study of modulations 
to closely related keys, additional diatonic seventh chords, altered chords, and 
borrowed chords. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

2117 MUSIC THEORY IV 

(Prerequisite: MUT 2116 or equivalent. Co-requisite: MUT 2247) This course is a 
continuation of MUT 2116, and includes the study of secondary dominants, 
other seventh chord and altered chord structures, chords of the ninth, eleventh, 
and thirteenth and advanced modulations. The shorter music forms are studied 
through analysis and original composition. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

2231 KEYBOARD HARMONY I 

(Prerequisite: MUT 1112 and MUT 1242 or the equivalents) This course provides a 
practical application through the medium of the keyboard of the materials 
studied in Music Theory, with emphasis on realization of bass figurations, 
modulations, harmonization of melodies, transpositions, and improvisation. 0-2- 
1* (offered Fall term) 

2232 KEYBOARD HARMONY II 

(Prerequisite: MUT 2231 or equivalent) This course is a continuation of MUT 
2231 . 0-2-1 * (offered Winter term) 
2246 EAR TRAINING & SIGHT SINGING III 

(Prerequisite: MUT 1242 or equivalent) This course includes aural dictation and 
provides a practical approach to sight singing techniques, including pitch and 
rhythmic reading, with emphasis on chromatic materials. 0-2-1* (offered Fall 
term) 
|T 2247 EAR TRAINING & SIGHT SINGING IV 

(Prerequisite: MUT 2246 or equivalent) This course is a continuation of MUT 
2246. 0-2-1 * (offered Winter term) 

T2641 INSTRUMENTAL IMPROVISATION 

(Prerequisite: MUH 2016 and MUT 1001 or equivalent) This is a practical 
laboratory session involving the application of scales, chords, and melody to 
musical phrasing and expression in the jazz idiom. 0-2-1 * (offered upon demand) 

jcture-Lab-Credit Hours 

223 



Nursing 



Nursing 



FACULTY: Morgan (Chairperson), Benken, Boorman, 
Campbell, Coffin, Erickson-Kutlik, Faquir, 
Harmes, Harrell, Hayes, Huneke, Jarvis, 
Merkle, Metts, Poole, Woods 
Nursing, Pre-Nursing 

NUR, NUS.NUU 



Browr 

Harder 

McCanr 



MAJORS: 

COURSE PREFIXES: 
PROGRAMS: 

NURSING (A.S. 13-301) 

Please refer to Admission Requirements 

This program is approved by the Florida State Board of Nursing and graduates a 
eligible to take the examination for licensure to practice as Registered Nurses. Ar 
student convicted of a felony must have the charge reviewed by the State Board 
Nursing prior to entering the program. The program leads to graduation with tt 
Associate in Science Degree. Clinical experience is in local hospitals and otrv 
community agencies. Students are assigned to the clinical area and are responsib 
for providing their own transportation. 
All nursing courses must be taken in sequence and a grade of "C" or better must t 
earned in BOTH the clinical and academic components of each course. Other course 
listed must be taken in the sequence designated or prior to the nursing course. 
The student must maintain a "C" average to remain in the program and must make 
"C" or above in all nursing courses and Anatomy and Physiology, and Microbiology. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE Fall Winter Spring 

APB1190 Anatomy and Physiology 1 2 

APB 1 190L Anatomy and Physiology I Lab 1 

MCB1000 Microbiology 2 

MCB 1000L Microbiology Lab 1 

ENC1103 Freshman Communications 1 3 

NUR1021C Fundamentals of Nursing 6 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

APB 1191 Anatomy and Physiology II 2 

APB1191L Anatomy and Physiology II Lab 1 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

DIE 1201 Nutrition-Health and Disease I 2 

NUR1200C Medical and Surgical Nursing 1 6 

NUR 2092 Human Growth and Development 2 

NUR 2201C Medical and Surgical Nursing II 

18 16 



224 



Nursing 



COURSE 

NUR 2220C 
NUR2320C 
NUU3110 

or 

NUR2120C 

NUR2110C 

DIE 1202 , 

Plus 

SOC1200 
NUR2220C 
NUR2320C 
NUU3110 

or 

NUR2120C 

NUR2110C 

DIE 1202 

Plus 

POS1001* 
MGF1113K 



SOPHOMORE YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
TITLE Fall Winter 

Medical and Surgical Nursing Ml 5 

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing 4 

Nursing Seminar 1 

Pediatric Nursing 4 

Maternity Nursing 4 

Nutrition-Health and Disease Disease 1 

Physical Education 1 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Medical and Surgical Nursing III 5 

Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing 4 

Nursing Seminar 1 

Pediatric Nursing 4 

Maternity Nursing 4 

Nutrition-Health and Disease II 1 

Physical Education 1 

Introduction to Political Science , . 3 

Ratio and Proportion 1 

15-14 14-13 



*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

TEN MONTH LPN TO RN PROGRAM 

(Courses to be taken after student has met prerequirements) 

SEMESTER 

COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

NUR1202C Integrated Nursing 1 10 

NUR 2140C Integrated Nursing II s 4 

NUR 2092 Human Growth and Development 2 

DIE 1202 Nutrition-Health and Disease II 1 

NUR2220C Medicafand Surgical Nursing III.: 5 

NUU 31 10 Nursing Seminar 1 

NUR 2320C Psychiatric-Mental Health Nursing 4 

DIE 1201 Nutrition-Health and Disease I 2 

29 



225 



Nursing 

PRE-NURSING (A.A. 13-302) 

This program is intended to give the student the first two years of a four-year course 
leading to a Bachelor's Degree in nursing. Since requirements of colleges vary, 
students should obtain a catalog of the senior college to which they intend to transfer 
and consult with the Dean of the School of Nursing in order to obtain optimum choice 
of courses at the Junior College. In some cases, it may be advisable to transfer at the 
end of the freshman year. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



COURSE 

BSC1010 
BSC1010L 
ENC1103 
ENC1136 
MCB 1000 
MCB 1000L 
HES 1000* 
MGF1113 

SOC 1200 

POS1001** 

CHNM015 

or 
PSC1513 



ARH 1000 

or 
MUL1011 
APB1190 
APB1190L 
APB1191 
APB1191L 

HUN 1201 
WOH 1012 

or 
AMH2010 
WOH 1022 

or 
AMH 2020 
PSY2012 
EGC2120 
SPC 1600 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 



TITLE Fall 

Principles of Biology 3 

Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 

Microbiology 

Microbiology Lab 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

General Education Math I 

Physical Education 1 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Introduction to Political Science 

Principles of Chemistry 

Survey of Physical Science I (3) 

Elective 3 

16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Art Appreciation 3 

Music Appreciation (3) 

Anatomy and Physiology 1 2 

Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory 1 

Anatomy and Physiology II 

Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory 

Literature 

Elements of Nutrition 

Ancient & Medieval Civilizations 3 

U.S. History to 1865 (3) 

Modern Civilizations 

U.S. History from 1865 (3) 

General Psychology 3 

Personality Development 

Fundamentals of Speech 3 



Winter 



16 



15 



15 



'HES 2121 may be substituted. 
POS2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



226 



Nursing 




COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

NUR1021C FUNDAMENTALS OF NURSING 

This course is an orientation to the field of nursing and includes basic nursing 
concepts and procedures based on scientific principles. Emphasis is placed on 
identifying and meeting the patient's needs, and using the problem solving 
approach in nursing situations. Mental hygiene concepts are introduced to form 
a basis for better understanding of the patient as a person, and as a background 
for further study. 3-9-6* (offered Fall term) 

NUR 1200C MEDICAL AND SURGICAL NURSING I 

(Prerequisite: NUR 1021C) This segment is an introduction to nursing needs of 
the adult with more common medical and surgical conditions. Patient-centered 
teaching in the clinical experience provides opportunity for development of 
skills. 3-9-6* (offered Winter term) 

NUR 1202C INTEGRATED NURSING I 

(Co-requisites: DIE 1201 and NUR 2092 by completion or challenge examination) 
This course utilizes the practical nurse's knowledge of medical and surgical 
conditions, increasing that knowledge in relations to those disorders commonly 
seen in our society. It also includes those aspects of professional nursing not 
usually included in the practical nurse's education, such as nursing 
management skills, role transition, and the nursing process. Patient centered 
clinical experience is provided in the medical and surgical setting, coronary and 
intensive care units. 8-6-10* (offered Fall term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



227 



Nursing 

NUR 2092 HUMAN GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

This course is a study of the growth and development of the well individual and 
includes the implications for health care. Emphasis is placed on the develop- 
ment concepts applicable to specific age groups and the change necessitated 
through the mature years and into old age. 2-0-2* (offered Fall and Winter terms) 

NUR2110C MATERNITY NURSING 

(Prerequisite: NUR 2201 C) A family centered course dealing with all facets of the 
childbearing phase of the woman's life. Pregnancy, labor and delivery, the 
postpartum and care of the newborn are included. Emphasis is placed on the 
normal aspects of the maternity and neonatal cycle, and the prevention of 
complications during this period. Clinical experiences and observations are 
available in local hospitals and other health agencies. 2-6-4* (offered Fall and 
Winter terms) 

NUR2120C PEDIATRIC NURSING 

(Prerequisite: NUR 2201 C) This course includes the problems of the child from 
infancy through adolescence with emphasis on the role of the nurse in the 
prevention and care of common diseases encountered in this age group. Prin- 
ciples of growth and development are utilized throughout the course. Clinical 
experience provides opportunity to apply knowledge and skill in the hospital and 
other local health agencies. 2-6-4* (offered Fall and Winter terms) 

NUR2140C INTEGRATED NURSING II 

(Prerequisite: NUR 1202C) (Challenge exam for obstetric and pediatric nursing) 
This course is designed to increase practitioner's depth of knowledge of 
problems of the child from infancy through adolescence with emphasis on the 
role of the nurse in the prevention and care of common disease encountered in 
this age group. Principles of growth and development are utilized throughout 
the course. Also included is a family centered course dealing with all facets of 
the child-bearing phase of the woman's life. Pregnancy, labor, delivery, post- 
partum and care of the newborn are included. Emphasis is placed on the normal 
aspects of the maternity and neonatal cycle and the prevention of complications 
during this period. Clinical experiences and observations are available in local 
health care agencies. 3-3-4* (offered Spring term) 

NUR 2201C MEDICAL AND SURGICAL NURSING II 

(Prerequisite: NUR 1200C) This is a continuation of NUR 1200C. 2-6-4* (offered 
Spring term) 
NUR2220C MEDICAL AND SURGICAL NURSING III 

(Prerequisite: NUR 2201 C) Provides a continuation of medical-surgical nursing. 
Building on the prerequisite science and nursing courses, this course is con- 
cerned with more complex nursing problems. Clinical experience is planned so 
that the student will have opportunities to refine certain skills, and will also be 
expected to utilize past learning as she is challenged to increasingly use her 
own initiative in solving problems. The student is increasingly concerned with 
the multiplicity of interrelated factors in the patient's state of health as she is 
taught to plan for patient's discharge and is concimitantly introduced to 
community health agencies. 3-6-5* (offered Fall and Winter terms) 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
228 



Nursing 

NUR2250C CORONARY CARE NURSING 

This is a course for graduate nurses and involves the study of patho-physiology 
and electrocardiography and nursing care of the patient with acute and chronic 
coronary heart disease. The course meets eight hours a day, five days a week, 
for four weeks and includes classroom and clinical experience. Resource people 
are used in areas of specialization. The course is approved by the Florida Heart 
Association and the student receives a certificate upon successful completion. 
The student applies for the course by contacting the Heart Association of Palm 
Beach County. 4-6-6* (offered Fall and Winter term) 

NUR 2320C PSYCHIATRIC - MENTAL HEALTH NURSING 

(Prerequisite: NUR 2201C) This course is designed to give the student an un- 
derstanding of the principles, concepts and processes of psychiatric nursing. A 
thorough study of the various types of behavior presented by the mentally ill is 
presented with major emphasis on nursing intervention into the problems 
presented by these patients. The current treatment modalities are reviewed with 
emphasis on the nurses' responsibilities. The spectrum of community 
resources available for the prevention of mental illness, and the treatment and 
rehabilitation of the emotionally disturbed person are stressed. 2-6-4* (offered 
Fall and Winter terms) 

NUR 2710C PATIENT ASSESSMENT 

This is a course for graduate nurses and is designed to extend their role in the 
health care system. The course will provide information on patient history taking 
skills, problem oriented records and basic principles of physical assessment. 
The four-week course will have three hours lecture and three hours laboratory. 
One hour credit, (offered Winter term) 

NUR 2712 PEDIATRIC ASSESSMENT 

(Prerequisite: NUR 2710C with a "C" or better) The course will provide the 
requisite didactic knowledge and skill requirements for the experienced 
registered nurse to become competent in basic pediatric assessment. The 
registered nurse will, after course completion, under a physician's supervision, 
be able to traige pediatric patients and facilitate them into the health care 
system. This course will be twelve weeks long. 2-4-3* (offered Winter term) 

NUR 2713 ADULT ASSESSMENT 

(Prerequisite: NUR 2710C with a "C" or better) The course will provide the 
requisite didactic knowledge and skill requirements for the experienced 
registered nurse to become competent in basic adult assessment. The 
registered nurse will, after course completion, under a physician's supervision, 
be able to triage adult patients and facilitate them into the health care system. 
The course will be twelve weeks long. 2-5-3* (offered Winter term) 

NUU3110 NURSING SEMINAR 

A nursing seminar designed to foster critical thinking and intellectual curiosity. 
Includes historical look at nursing, team nursing, the law and the nurse, op- 
portunities in nursing, and current issues influencing the practice of nursing. 1- 
0-1 * (offered Fall & Winter terms) 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



229 



Physical Education 



Physical Education 

FACULTY: Reynolds (Chairperson), Bell, Knowles, Rhodes. PBJC 

South, Blanton 
MAJORS: Physical Education 

COURSE PREFIXES: DAA, LEI, PEL, PEM, PEN, PEO, PEP, PEQ, PET 
PROGRAMS: 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION (A.A. 10-227) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE Fall Winter 

BSC 1010 Principles of Biology 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

PE0 1323 Volleyball: Fundamentals and Officiating 3 

PEO 2623 Basketball: Fundamentals and Officiating 3 

PEP 1221 Fundamentals of Stunts, Tumbling and Gymnastics 3 

PET 2000 Introduction to Physical Education 3 

POS1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

ZO0 1013 General Zoology 3 

ZOO 1013L General Zoology Laboratory 1 

15 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

DAA 1050 Fundamentals of Rhythmics 2 

HES2121 Life Science and Health 3 

MGF1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

PEL 1016 Fundamentals of Field Sports 2 

PE0 1141 Fundamentals of Archery and Golf 2 

PEO 2341 Fundamentals of Racquet Sports 3 

PET 2100 Essentials of Fitness 2 

PSY2012 General Psychology 3 

SPC1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Literature. 3 

Electives* * 2 

15 16 

*POS2041 orAMH 2010 may be substituted. 
**Must be General Education Elective. 

NOTE: Physical Education major courses are for professional Physical Education 
majors only and will not satisfy graduation requirements for other majors. 



230 



Physical Education 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Dance Activities 

DAA 1 500 MODERN JAZZ DANCE 

This course is designed to give the student a knowledge of and fundamental 
skills in modern jazz dance styles and techniques. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall and Winter 
terms) 

DAA 2160 FUNDAMENTALS OF INTERPRETIVE MOVEMENT 

Included in this course are theory and practice of basic body conditioning 
exercises, fundamentals of movement and its relationship to rhythm, design, 
and dynamics. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall and Winter terms) 

DAA 2161 ADVANCED INTERPRETIVE MOVEMENT 

This course is designed to give the student further opportunity to pursue the 
study and application of rhythmic movement through combining acquired skills 
and knowledge. 0-2-1 * (offered Winter term) 

DAA 2374 FOLK AND SQUARE DANCE 

This course includes the study, practice and application of basic skills in the 
square dance and other folk dances of America and other countries. 0-2-1* 
(offered Winter term) 

Leisure 

LEI 2700 RECREATION FOR THE AGED AND HANDICAPPED 

This course is designed to develop knowledge and skills in recreational ac- 
tivities for the ill, the agina, and the physically and mentally handicapped. 1-4-3* 
(offered Fall term) 

Physical Education Activities 
PEL 101 1 TEAM ACTIVITIES 

Provision is made in this course for a general review of a variety of team ac- 
tivities. Skills, strategy, and application of the rules of soccer, speedball and 
gatorball will be included with flag-football and softball reviewed when in 
season. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall term) 

PEL 1211 SOFTBALL 

This course includes skills, strategy, and application of rules for softball with 
opportunity given for development of officiating techniques. 0-2-1* (offered Fall 
and Winter terms) 

PEL 1321 VOLLEYBALL 

This course introduces the student to the various skills and fundamental 
techniques of volleyball. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall and Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



231 



Physical Education 

PEL 1346 BADMINTON 

This course offers instruction in basic skills and fundamentals with practice in 
singles and doubles. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall and Winter terms) 

PEL 1441 RACQUETBALL&PADDLEBALL 

This course is designed to provide the student with basic skills, technique, 
knowledge, strategy, and application of rules in racquetball&paddlebail. 0-2-1* 
(offered Fall and Winter terms) 

PEL 1621 BASKETBALL 

This course offers a review of the basic skills of basketball and the in- 
terpretation and application of the rules. Provisions are made for the study of 
basic offenses and defenses and their usage. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall term) 

PEL 21 11 BOWLING 

This course includes the theory, the application and the practice of basic skills 
in bowling. 0-2-1 * (See Fee Schedule) (offered Fall and Winter terms) 

PEL 2121 GOLF 

This class is designed to offer instruction in the fundamental skills and the 
application of the rules for golf. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall, Winter and Spring terms) 

PEL 2141 ARCHERY 

This course is designed to provide the student with basic skills, techniques and 
knowledge in archery. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall, Winter and Spring terms) 

PEL 2341 BEGINNING TENNIS 

This course is designed to provide the student with basic skills, techniques, 
fundamentals, strategy, and application of rules in tennis. (Students furnish own 
racquets) 0-2-1 * (offered Fall, Winter and Spring terms) 

PEL 2342 INTERMEDIATE TENNIS 

(Prerequisite: PEL 2341 or consent of instructor) This course is designed for the 
more advanced tennis student to pursue application of tennis skills by a com- 
bination of learning analyzations, strategies, and progressions of skills 
development. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall and Winter terms) 

PEM1100 PHYSICAL FITNESS 

This course introduces the student to the concept of fitness for living. Each 
student shall have the opportunity to evaluate one's self and engage in a 
planned program for fitness. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall and Winter terms) 

PEM 1201 GYMNASTICS 

This course is designed to develop elementary skills and acquire safety 
procedures. Opportunity is provided for learning basic skills in tumbling, free 
exercise, balance beam, parallel bars and trampoline. 0-2-1* (offered Fall and 
Winter terms) 

PEM 2405 SELF-DEFENSE 

Designed to develop self-confidence and abilities for self-defense in the event of 
an attack upon the person. Skills developed in use of personal means of 
defense, includes instruction in crime prevention by safeguarding person and 
property through awareness. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall, Winter and Spring terms) 

PEN 1231 BASIC SAILING 

The purpose of this course is to provide a basic understanding of sailing, sail 
boats, sailing skills, and water safety. 0-2-1 * 

PEN 2113 LIFESAVING 

* This course is a combination of skills and knowledge with a positive attitude 
toward water safety. Successful completion qualifies the student for the 
American Red Cross Lifesaving Certificate. 0-2-1* (offered Winter term — see 
fee schedule) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

232 



Physical Education 

>EN2122 SWIMMING AND DIVING 

This course is designed to provide the student with the opportunity to learn the 
elements of good swimming, diving, and water safety skills beyond the beginner 
and advanced beginner level. 0-2-1* (offered Fall & Winter terms — see fee 
schedule) 

} EN 2251 CANOE CAMPING 

This course will provide the opportunity for students to acquire the knowledge, 
skills and appreciation of nature necessary for successful leisure experiences in 
the wilderness and to plan for canoe trips (overnight). 0-2-1 * 

3 EQ 21 1 5 WATER SAFETY INSTRUCTOR 

(Prerequisite: PEN 2113) This course provides the individual with a strong 
teaching knowledge of basic strokes of swimming, life saving theory and 
techniques of rescue, safe basic small craft skills and to train the individual to 
stress safe practices in any aquatic activity. Successful completion certifies the 
student to become an American National Red Cross Water Safety Instructor. 0-2- 
1 * (offered Winter term) 

Physical Education Major Courses 

DAA105G FUNDAMENTALS OF RHYTHMICS 

Basic fundamentals of folk dance, square dance, singing games and other 

rhythmic activities. 1-2-2* (offered Winter term) 
»EL 1016 FUNDAMENTALS OF FIELD SPORTS 

Practice in basic skills, strategies, and progressions in soccer and speedball. 1- 

2-2* (offered Fall term) 
>EN 1121 FUNDAMENTALS OF AQUATICS 

Practice in the basic skills and progressions in swimming. Attitudes towards 

safety are developed. Students are exposed to the organization of and the of- 
ficiating of meets. 1-2-2* (offered Fall term) 
>E01141 FUNDAMENTALS OF ARCHERY AND GOLF 

This course is designed to give the student knowledge and skills in archery and 

golf. 1-2-2* 
>EO 1323 VOLLEYBALL: FUNDAMENTALS AND OFFICIATING 

This course is designed to give the student knowledge and skills in playing and 

officiating volleyball. 2-2-3* 
>EO 2341 FUNDAMENTALS OF RACQUET SPORTS 

This course is designed to give the student knowledge and skills in tennis, 

racquetball, and badminton. 2-2-3* 
>EO 2623 BASKETBALL: FUNDAMENTALS AND OFFICIATING 

This course is designed to give the student knowledge and skills in playing and 

officiating basketball. 2-2-3* 
>EP 1221 FUNDAMENTALS OF STUNTS, TUMBLING, AND GYMNASTICS 

This course is designed to give the student self-confidence, knowledge, and 

skills in performing acrobatic stunts, tumbling, and gymnastics. 2-2-3* 
'EP2101 ESSENTIALS OF FITNESS 

This course is designed to give the physical education majors a fundamental 

knowledge of physical fitness, fitness evaluation, and program planning. 2-0-2* 
»ET 2000 INTRODUCTION TO PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

(Prerequisite: Open only to declared PE majors and minors) This course is an 

introduction to physical education and related areas including history, program, 

training and professional opportunities. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

233 



Related Health Programs 



Related Health Programs 

FACULTY: Schmiederer (Chairperson, Allied Health Division), 
Bortnick, Meeker, Sabonis-Chafee, Saunders, Seemayer, 
Walker 

MAJORS: Health Education (A.A.), Medical Laboratory Technology 
(A.S.), Medical Technologist (A.A.), Mental Health 
Technology (A.S.), Occupational Therapy (A.A.), Oc- 
cupational Therapy Assistant (A.S.), Paramedic (A.S.), 
Physical Therapy (A.A.), Radiological Technology (A.S.) 

COURSE PREFIXES: APB, EMT, GEY, HES, LEI, MHT, MLS, MRE, 

OTH, RTE 

PROGRAMS: 

HEALTH EDUCATION (A.A. 21-226) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



COURSE 

ARH 1000 

or 
MUL1011 
BSC1010 
BSC1010L 
ZOO 1013 
ZOO1013L 
ENC1103 
ENC1136 
HES 2121 
MGF1113 

SOC1200 
POS1001* 



CHM1015 

HUN 1201 
HES 1400 
PH1 1100 
PSY2012 
EGC2120 
SPC 1600 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 



TITLE Fall 

Art Appreciation 3 

Music Appreciation (3) 

Principles of Biology 3 

Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

General Zoology 

General Zoology Laboratory 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 

Life Science and Health 3 

General Education Math I 

Physical Education 1 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Introduction to Political Science 

17 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Principles of Chemistry 3 

Literature 3 

Elements of Nutrition 3 

Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 

Art of Thinking 

General Psychology 3 

Personality Development 

Fundamentals of Speech 

Electives 3 



Winter 



14 



15 



16 



'POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



234 



Related Health Programs 



MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY (A.A. 21036) 

Ninety (90) semester hours of preliminary work are required for admission to the in- 
stitution offering the final year of laboratory instruction. While 90 of these hours may 
be taken at a junior college, the student will receive only an M.T. designation and no 
bachelor's degree upon completion of the clinical year. If a baccalaureate degree is 
desired along with the M.T., the student must complete the third year of preliminary 
work at a baccalaureate degree-granting institution. The requirements for the A. A. 
degree at Palm Beach Junior College will be fulfilled at the end of the school year in 
the program outlines. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
TITLE Fall Winter 

Principles of Biology 3 

Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

General Zoology 3 

General Zoology Laboratory 1 

General Chemistry I 3 

General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

General Chemistry II 3 

General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 3 

College Algebra 3 

Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 3 

Art Appreciation 3 

Music Appreciation (3) 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Physical Education 1 

17 17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Literature 3 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Introduction to Political Science 3 

General Physics I 3 

General Physics I Laboratory 1 

General Physics II 3 

General Physics II Laboratory 1 

Organic Chemistry I 3 

Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

Organic Chemistry II 3 

Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

Physical Education 1 

Electives 3 

14 15 

*HES2121 may be substituted. 
**POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

NOTE: Some colleges offering Medical Technology highly recommend some of the 
following courses in addition to the above requirements: BOT 1010-BOT 1010L, PHI 
1100, STA 2014, COC 1110. 

235 



Related Health Programs 



MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 21-032) 

Requirements for Certification by the Registry of Medical Technologists of the 

American Society of Clinical Pathologists, Dated January 1973. 

"Medical Laboratory Technician — MLT(ASCP)" 

"CLA (ASCP) certification plus associate degree or equivalent, including courses in 

chemistry and biology, plus Registry examination (Until July 1, 1973 those individuals 

certified CLA (ASCP) who meet academic requirements may be certified MLT (ASCP) 

without examination.)" 

In compliance with this requirement for certification, the following program for 

Medical Laboratory Technology has been developed. 

Credit will be granted for the following courses and hours of credit to: 

(1) A person who is a Certified Laboratory Assistant, CLA (ASCP). 

(2) A person who is a Certified Technician as approved by the American Medical 
Technologists and who is actively employed. 

(3) A person who is a Registered Medical Technologist as approved by the In- 
ternational Society of Clinical Laboratory Technologists and who is actively 
employed. 

A person who does not have any of the above certifications must make his own 
arrangements with a hospital that provides such a training program. Information on 
local hospital training may be obtained from the college. 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

MLS 1000 Intro, to Medical Laboratory Technology 4 

MLS 1430 Medical Parasitology 3 

MLS 1600 Medical Instrumentation 2 

MLS 2610C Clinic Chemistry 5 

MLS 2360 Hematology and Urinalysis 4 

MLS 2530 Immunogematology and Serology 4 

MLS 2804 Clinical Procedures 9 

31 
COLLEGE COURSES TO BE COMPLETED ARE: 

Fall Winter 

BSC1010 Principles of Biology 3 

BSC 1010L Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

MCB 1000 Microbiology 2 

MCB 1000L Microbiology Laboratory 1 

CHM1045 General Chemistry I 3 

CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 3 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAT 1033 Intermediate Algebra 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

18 16 

*HES2121 may be substituted. 
* *POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

236 



Related Health Programs 

MENTAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 21-340) 

A Mental Health Technologist will work in a variety of human services under the direct 
supervision of professional personnel. He will be equipped to make a useful con- 
tribution to community action in programs in innovative new roles and functions for 
human service workers. 

The Mental Health Technology curriculum is designed to educate a Mental Health 
generalist who is trained for a family of occupations, rather than a specific job. 
Students will study a core of general education subjects combined with specialized 
courses related to behavior disorders. As part of the program the student will par- 
ticipate in supervised field work experience in several different kinds of community 
agencies and institutions. 

Upon Completion of the Mental Health curriculum, the student will be able to function 
in a wide range of roles in the social services and human service agencies. The 
beginning professional may assist in individual and group counseling, psychological 
assessment and conducting initial interviews in social service agencies and child care 
centers. Other settings in which the beginning professional may function include 
special education classes, general hospital settings, and mental health and/or sub- 
stance abuse centers. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



COURSE 

ENC1103 
MHT1010 
MHT1300 

PSY2012 

SOC1200 

ENC1136 

HES 1400 

MHT1210 

MHT1800C 

DEP2102 



MHT2122 
MHT2810C 

EGC2120 

POS1001* 

SOC1010** 

HES 1000** 
S PC 1600 
MAF2001 



TITLE 

Freshman Communications I , 

Introduction to Mental Health 

Interviewing and Recording 

Physical Education 

General Psychology 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 

Freshman Communications II 

Standard First Aid and Personal Safety . 

Group Dynamics 

Mental Health Field Work I 

Child Growth and Development 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Psychotherapy: Theory and Practice . . . 

Mental Health Field Work II 

Physical Education 

Personality Development 

Introduction to Political Science 

American Social Problems 

Science 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 

Fundamentals of Speech 

Marriage and Family Relationships 



SEMESTER 

HOURS CREDIT 

Fall Winter 

3 

3 

3 

1 

3 

3 

3 
1 
3 
6 
3 



16 



16 



16 



14 



*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

* * If a student is planning to work in the area of alcoholism rehabilitation, he may 
substitute MHT 1510. 
***HES2121 may be substituted. 



237 



Related Health Programs 




OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ASSISTANT (A.S. 21-240) 

The Occupational Therapy Assistant is trained to work under the direct supervision of 
a Registered Occupational Therapist (B.S. Degree holder) giving specific treatment of 
patients with physical or psychological disabilities. This curriculum has been 
developed along the guidelines of the American Occupational Therapy Association 
and has received full approval from that organization. Graduates are eligible to take the 
American Occupational Therapy Association examination to become a Certified 
Occupational Therapy Assistant. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



COURSE 

APB1190 
APB1190L 
ENC1103 
ENC1136 
HES1000** 
HES1400 
MHT1210 
NUR 2092 
OTH 1001 
OTH1121 
OTH 1800 
OTH 2410 

PSY2012 
SOC1200 



ART 1101 
OTH 1300C 
OTH 1520C 
OTH 2100C 
OTH 2420 
OTH 2840 
POS1001* 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 

TITLE Fall Winter 

Anatomy and Physiology 1 2 

Anatomy and Physiology Laboratory I 1 

Freshman Communications I . . . . . 3 

Freshman Communications II 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 

Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 

Principles of Group Dynamics 

Human Growth and Development 

Introduction to Occupational Therapy 3 

Therapeutic Media 3 

Occupational Therapy Practicum 2 

Medical Problems Related to Rehabilitation 

Physical Education 1 

General Psychology 3 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 

18 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Arts and Crafts II 3 

Psychiatric Occupational Therapy 3 

Pediatric Occupational Therapy 3 

Occupational Therapy Activities 3 

Occupational Therapy for the Physically Disabled . . 3 

Clinical Practice 

Introduction to Political Science 3 



18 



18 



*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
**HES2121 may be substituted. 
238 



Related Health Programs 



OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (A.A. 21-237) 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
TITLE Fall Winter 

Arts and Crafts I 3 

Art Appreciation 3 

Music Appreciation (3) 

Principles of Biology 3 

Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

General Zoology 3 

General Zoology Laboratory 1 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 3 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

General Education Math I 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Introduction to Political Science 3 



16 



17 




239 



Related Health Programs 

OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY (Cont'd) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ART 1201 Design I 3 

ART 1110 Ceramics I 2 

Literature 3 3 

HES1400 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 1 

PSC1513 Survey of Physical Science I 3 

PSC 1341 Survey of Physical Science II . . , 4 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

EGC 2120 Personality Development 3 

SPC1600 Fundamentals of Speech. .. . 3 

Electives 3 

*HES 2121 may be substituted. 15 16 

**POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

PARAMEDIC (A.S. 21-449) 

This program is designed for the individual who wishes to increase his/her knowledge 
in the area of scientific principles related to the paramedic skill areas. The graduate 
will also obtain the needed knowledge and skills in the management and human 
relations aspects of supervision. 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

EMT 2208 Emergency Medical Tech.— Paramedic 1 8 

EMT 2209 Emergency Medical Tech.— Paramedic II 8 

16* 

APB1190 Anatomy and Physiology 1 2 

APB 1 190L Anatony and Physiology I Laboratory 1 

APB 1 191 Anatomy and Physiology II 2 

APB 1 191 L Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory 1 

CHM1015 Principles of Chemistry 3 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000 Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAN 1700 Introduction to Business 3 

MAN 2000 Principles of Management 3 

MAN 2100 Supervision- Human Relations in Business . . 3 

MAN 2342 Supervision and Personnel Administration 3 

MRE 2001 Medical Terminology 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

PSY 2012 General Psychology.. 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

SPC1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Physical Education . . . : 2 



62 



'Paramedic Certificate 

'AMH 2020 or POS 2041 may be substituted. 



240 



Related Health Programs 



PHYSICAL THERAPY (A.A. 21-228) 



COURSE 

ART 1000 

or 
MUL1011 
BSC1010 
BSC1010L 
ZOO 1013 
ZOO1013L 
ENC1103 
ENC1136 

MAC 1104 
CHM 1045 
CHM 1045L 
CHM 1046 
CHM 1046L 
PH1 1100 



HES1000* 
HES1400 
PHY 2023 
PHY 2048L 
PHY 2024 
PHY 2049L 
PSY2012 
EGC2120 
SOC1200 
POS1001** 



FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
TITLE Fall Winter 

Art Appreciation 3 

Music Appreciation (3) 

Principles of Biology 3 

Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

General Zoology . . . > 3 

General Zoology Laboratory 1 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

College Algebra 3 

General Chemistry I 3 

General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

General Chemistry II 3 

General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

Art of Thinking 3 

18 15 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Literature 3 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 1 

General Physics I 3 

General Physics I Laboratory 1 

General Physics II 3 

General Physics II Laboratory. 1 

General Psychology 3 

Personality Development 3 

Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Introduction to Political Science 3 

Electives 3 



HES2121 may be substituted. 
' POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 




13 



16 



241 



Related Health Programs 

RADIOLOGICAL TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 21-303) 

Palm Beach Junior College provides the opportunity for any individual who has 

completed a program of Radiological Technology which meets the requirements 

established by the Council or Medical Education and Hospitals of the American 

Medical Association and the American Society of Radiologic Technologists, and 

passed the Registry examination in X-ray Technology to finish the below listed 

requirement of the college for graduation to receive an Associate in Science Degree in 

Radiological Technology. Information may be obtained from the College on 

Radiological Technology training in local hospitals. 

Credit would be granted to the student for courses listed below: 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

RTE1401C Radiological Technique 1 3 

RTE 1800L Applied Radiological Technique 1 3 

RTE 1402C Radiological Technique II 3 

RTE1810L Applied Radiological Technique II 5 

APB 1223 Topgraphic Anatomy and Physiology 3 

RTE2403C Radiological Technique III 3 

RTE 2850L Applied Radiological Technical III 3 

RTE2404C Radiological Technique IV 3 

RTE 2840L Applied Radiological Technique IV 5 

RTE 2860L Applied Radiological Technique V 5 

36 
ADDITIONAL COURSES TO BE COMPLETED BY THE STUDENT INCLUDE: 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE Fall Winter 

BSC1010 Principles of Biology 3 

BSC 1010L* Principles of Biology Laboratory -. . (1) 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

or 

ENC 1313 Technical Writing (3) 

HES1000** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Physical Education 1 1 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

MGF1113 General Education Math I (Modules G,H,K) 3 

13-14 15 

*BSC1010L is optional. 
**HES2121 may be substituted. 
* * * POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
NOTE: It is highly recommended that during the Fall Term, MRE 2001 be taken. 



242 



Related Health Programs 

BOURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

EMT 2208** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY — PARAMEDIC I 

(Prerequisite: State of Florida EMT I Certification). A theoretical and practical 
study of advanced life-saving procedures incorporated in life-support systems. 
The student shall learn to identify life-threatening situations and, under the 
direction of a physician, administer triage, IV's and treat shock, orthopedics soft 
tissue trauma and respiratory problems. Extrication and telemetry shall also be 
studied. 6-14-8* (offered Fall term) 

EMT 2209** EMERGENCY MEDICAL TECHNOLOGY- PARAMEDIC II 

(Prerequisite: A grade of "C" or higher in EMT 2208). The student shall learn both 
the theory and practice of advanced life-support skills to include the car- 
diovascular medical emergencies and the associated pharmacology. Also CNS 
and OB-Peds emergencies are studied. 6-14-8* (offered Winter term) 
*EMT 2208 and EMT 2209 are designed specifically for individuals who are currently 
mployed in Advanced Life-Support Agencies and have at least one (1) year's ex- 

>erience as a Florida State Certified EMT I. 
EY 2000 GERONTOLOGY 

A practical human services approach to gerontology for the beginning 
professional. This study of aging includes psychological, sociological and 
biological factors related to the process of growing old. Special emphasis is 
placed on demography, income, employment, physical health, mental health, 
housing, transportation, and criminal victimization. Also included are the Older 
Americans Act, the Areawide Councils on Aging. Multi-purpose Human Services 
Resources, local, state and national. The course is designed to meet the needs 
of those already working in the field who are seeking increased knowledge and 
skills, as well as more positive attitudes. It is also for the beginner in the field of 
human services. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

HES 1000 PERSPECTIVES ON HEALTHFUL LIVING 

This course provides students with a comprehension of scientific knowledge 
that applies to the application and promotion of good health status for himself 
and society. Current health findings are used to establish an awareness of 
various health problems in order to understand ourselves biologically, 
emotionally, and socially. Special emphasis is placed upon the removal of 
ecologic hazards, developing a healthy personality, improving organic efficiency 
and preparation for effective family living. 2-0-2*f (offered all terms) 

HES 1202 THE NATION'S HEALTH 

This course assumes that America's system of health care is on the examining 
table. It explores such issues as the possible overmedicalization of society, the 
potential impact of national health insurance and the needs of the poor and the 
aged. It examines the political, ethical, economic, and social issues surrounding 
medical science, modern drugs, and biomedical research. 3-0-3* 

HES 1400 STANDARD FIRST AID AND PERSONAL SAFETY 

This course offers a review of the theories, practices, and skills that meet cer- 
tification requirements by the American Red Cross. Students will also be in- 
structed in the techniques of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. 0-2-1* (offered Fall 
& Winter terms) 

' Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



243 



Related Health Programs 

HES2121 LIFE SCIENCE AND HEALTH 

This course is designed to provide health knowledge for individuals who are 
interested in teaching health to children, youth, and young adults. The content 
will analyze current findings from medicine and health science which influence 
the total status for man and society. The development of values, attitudes and 
practices will be stressed in view of controversial health issues in our social 
milieu with an aim to aid man's adaptation to life style situations. 3-0-3*t (of- 
fered Fall & Winter terms) 

LEI 2702 INTRODUCTION TO THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY 
(Effective Winter Term 79-80) 
The course will, using a variety of instructional methodologies, address the 
requisite communicative and administrative skills; the cognative and affective 
domains of the physical and the psycho-social aspects of aging; the activities 
and their adaptations; volunteerism; and program concepts that are vital to the 
successful performance of activity coordinators. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

MHT 1010 INTRODUCTION TO MENTAL HEALTH TECHNOLOGY 

An orientation to the field of mental health; history, current concepts and roles 
of beginning professionals in the field are reviewed and discussed. Various 
community agencies are explored. A core of studies will investigate the services 
offered, eligibility, areas served, fees, and methods of treatment and referral. 
Field trips and guest lecturers may be scheduled. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

MHT 1210 PRINCIPLES OF GROUP DYNAMICS 

A course designed to help students realize their potential for growth more fully, 
and to increase their ability to work effectively with others in a variety of 
situations. Lectures, discussions and reading material will consider group 
processes including factors of cohesion, conflict, individual roles, com- 
munications systems! tasks and problem solving. Techniques of psychodrama, 
role playing, and sociodrama will be explored. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

MHT 1300 INTERVIEWING AND RECORDING 

A study of the purposes, structure, focus, and techniques employed in effective 
interviewing and recording of data. Experiences will be provided for practice ir 
observation, recording, and summarizing personal histories. 3-0-3* (offered Fal 
term) 

MHT 1510 COUNSELING THE CHEMICALLY DEPENDENT PERSON 

This course is designed for the student who has elected to counsel the 
chemically dependent person. It emphasizes one-to-one helping. It also applies 
in practice sessions the pathology of chemical dependency and knowledge o 
helping resources. Discussion, role playing and critique are part of this in 
struction. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

MHT 1800C FIELD WORK IN MENTAL HEALTH I 

(Prerequisite: MHT 1010 and MHT 1300) This course offers basic understanding 
of the historical foundations for the growth of the mental health movement anc 
its significance in preventive and therapeutic measures. Techniques of objective 
observing, testing recording data, methods of case study, interviewing and the 
role of mental health personnel are studied. Students will be assigned to dif 
ferent centers and seminars will be arranged. Participants will be supervised by 
the instructor of the course and by the personnel of the center. 2-8-6* (offeree 
Winter term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



244 



Related Health Programs 

MHT 2122 PSYCHOTHERAPY: THEORY AND PRACTICE 

(Prerequisite: PSY 2012) The student will obtain a basic knowledge of un- 
derstanding of the current systems of psychotherapy to include terminology, 
modality types, and effectiveness in regard to specific syndromes and/or 
dysfunctions. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

MHT2810C FIELD WORK IN MENTAL HEALTH II 

(Prerequisite: MHT 1800C) A continuation in the study of testing procedures, 
interviewing techniques and a further understanding of the mental technicians 
in various settings. The focus will be on learning and experiencing group skills 
in various patient and staff encounters. Students will be rotated through dif- 
ferent services and work with staff as team members; supervision will be 
provided by the instructor of the course and the personnel of the center and 
seminars will be arranged. 2-8-6* (offered Winter term) 

MLS 1000 INTRODUCTION TO MEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY 

An orientation to the field of laboratory medicine introducing basic equipment 
and techniques in all phases of the medical laboratory. 2-4-4* 

MLS 1430 MEDICAL PARASITOLOGY 

Emphasis is on the laboratory diagnosis of the protozoan, helminth and an- 
thopod infections of medical importance with special attention to those in- 
digenous to the area. Gross and microscopic materials for demonstration. 1-6-3* 

MLS1600C MEDICAL INSTRUMENTATION 

Care, maintenance, and use of medical electronic and optic equipment such as 
compound and dissection microscopes, spectrophotometers, colorimeters, 
atomic absorption spectrophotometers, pH meters, autoanalysers, flame 
photometers, blood gas apparatus, electrophoresis, coulter counters, etc. 
Selected topics in circuitry and fundamentals of electronics. 1-3-2* 

MLS2610C CLINICAL CHEMISTRY 

General principles involved in the quantitative analysis of the chemical con- 
stituents of such body substances as blood, urine, and feces in health and 
disease. Various techniques as colorimetry, potentiometrh, gasometry, 
f luorimetry and chromatography are applied. 2-9-5* 

ALS2360 HEMATOLOGY AND URINALYSIS 

Study of normal and abnormal cell morphology. Performance of tests such as 
cell counts, differentials, hematocrits, sedimentation rates, platelet counts, 
fragility, coagulation, etc. Urine analyzed for normal and abnormal constituents 
in health and disease. 2-6-4* 

ALS 2530 IMMUNOHEMATOLOGY AND SEROLOGY 

Blood banking including typing, grouping, and cross-matching. Antigen- 
antibody reactions. Complement fixation, precipitation, flocculation, 
hemagglutination, VDRL, and antistreptolysin tests. 2-6-4* 

/ILS2804 CLINICAL PROCEDURES 

Theory and practice of laboratory procedures involved in the disciplines of 
clinical chemistry, hematology, microbiology, parasitology, etc. Supervised 
experience in clinical laboratories in which students relate through the various 
departments. 4-27-13* 

/IRE 2001 MEDICAL TERMINOLOGY 

This course is designed to acquaint the student, who is preparing for a health 
related vocation, with the commonly used medical terminology. The com- 
ponents of medical terms are analyzed, terms are defined, and use of medical 
dictionary and related sources are emphasized. Application is made to 
procedures, diagnostic tests and conditions encountered in various health 
related fields. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

245 



Related Health Programs 

OTH 1001 INTRODUCTION TO OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

(Co-requisite: OTH 1800) An introduction to the history, philosophy, develop- 
ment and present status in rehabilitation of occupational therapy with emphasis 
on the role of the occupational therapy assistant. The use of occupational 
therapy in the treatment of geriatric patients wtih emphasis on man's need for 
work and leisure, the effects of illness and disability on human behavior in 
general and the psychological aspects of physical disability will also be 
discussed. Special attention will be given to current attitudes toward the dying 
patient. Medicare and Medicaid programs, agencies for health care, the law as it 
relates to patients, institutions and employees. Basic medical terminology Will 
be introduced. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

OTH 1121 THERAPEUTIC MEDIA (For OTA only) 

This course provides opportunities for the student to acquire competence in the 
areas of: skilled performance of minor craft activities, instruction of individuals 
and groups with emphasis on crafts, ordering of equipment and materials, and 
design and maintenance of activity files. Learning will be experiential, with 
demonstrations by the instructor involving student participation, student- 
instructed demonstrations and independent study projects. 2-2-3* (offered Fall 
term) 

OTH 1300C PSYCHIATRIC OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

(Prerequisites: OTH 1001, OTH 1800, PSY 2012, NUR 2092, MHT 1210) This 
course provides the student with an understanding of occupational therapy as a 
diagnostic, evaluative and treatment process for mental illness. Material, 
covered will include: review of abnormal psychology, past and current trends, 
the dyadic relationship, gropu phenomena in occupational therapy, the meaning 
of activities and current practices. Weekly experience in psychiatric and mental 
health facilities will be coordinated with class work. 2-2-3* (offered Fall term) 

OTH 1520C PEDIATRIC OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY 

(Prerequisites: OTH 1001 and OTH 1800C) The student will be introduced to the 
issues and concepts of O.T. in a pediatric setting with special emphasis upon 
the role of a C.O.T.A. in a school setting. Areas of study will include develop- 
mental stages, developmental tasks, the role of play in a child's world, needs of 
exceptional children, sensory integration, the role of O.T. in pediatrics (tools of 
the profession), and identifying O.T. goals of treatment. Weekly experience in 
pediatric facilities will be coordinated with class work. 2-2-3* (offered Fall term) 

OTH 1800 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY PRACTICUM 

(Co-requisite: OTH 1001) This course provides three hours a week visiting 
County Health and Welfare agencies for one month and three months ex- 
perience as a volunteer in a Nursing Home Activity Program with opportunities 
to plan and implement appropriate activities under the supervision of the ac- 
tivity directors. Weekly seminars provide background material on the nursing 
home population and group evaluation of the experience. 1-3-2* (offered Fall 
term) 

OTH 2100C OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY ACTIVITIES LAB 

(Prerequisites: OTH 1001, OTH 1800) Instruction in activities of daily living for 
the disabled. Introduction to splinting and bracing with emphasis on purpose, 
proper application and daily care, development and use of forms and records, 
survey of therapeutic activities such as leather work, needlecraft, mosaics, 
copper tooling, etc., with emphasis on instructional techniques. Acquisition and 
use of equipment and materials, care of supplies and application in treatment. 
Development of skills to a point which permits follow through. 1-4-3* (offered 
Fall term) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

246 



Related Health Programs 

OTH 2410 MEDICAL PROBLEMS RELATED TO REHABILITATION 

(Prerequisites: OTH 1001, OTH 1800, APB 1190, APB 1190L) This course will 
familiarize the student with the etiology, diagnosis, detection, medical 
management and prognosis of the traumatic, chronic and degenerative con- 
ditions commonly treated in physical medicine and rehabilitation. 3-0-3* (offered 
Winter term) 

OTH 2420 OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY FOR THE PHYSICALLY DISABLED 

(Prerequisites: OTH 1001, OTH 1800, OTH 2410, OTH 1121, NUR 2092) Treatment 
methods for the general medical, chronic degenerative and traumatic conditions 
commonly seen in occupational therapy clinics. Muscle testing and joint range 
of motions measurements will be introduced. What to observe and how to report 
effectively. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

OTH 2840 SUPERVISED CLINICAL PRACTICE 

(Prerequisites: OTH 1300C, OTH 1800C, OTH 2420 and OTH 2100C) Clinical 
experience working with patients in local occupational therapy departments 
under the supervision of a registered occupational therapist. The experience is 
divided between a physical disabilities clinic and a mental health clinic. 0-24-8* 
(offered Winter term) 

RTE 1401 C RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE I 

This course includes a discussion of professional ethics, darkroom chemistry 
and technique, principles of radiographic exposure, radiographic positioning, 
and film critique. 

a. Professional Ethics — to acquaint the student with good ethical principles; 
to outline the responsibilities entailed by becoming a member of a paramedical 
profession; to explain the relationship of the X-ray technician to other 
technicians, the patients, the radiologist, attending physician, and other 
members of the hospital staff. 

b. Darkroom Chemistry and Technique — the objective course is to develop 
the knowledge and skills necessary for thorough and efficient darkroom 
procedures. To study the history and development of X-ray film and darkroom 
accessories. To gain a thorough knowledge of the chemical constituents of 
processing solutions and their functions. To appreciate various types of 
darkroom and processing apparatus. 

c. Principles of Radiographic Exposure I — the object of this course is to give 
the student a thorough understanding of the theory of X-ray technique and to 
correlate this knowledge with practical application, thus developing a thinking 
technician capable of devising a technique based on sound principles and 
practices. 

d. Radiographic Positioning I — the object of this course is to provide in- 
struction in the radiographic positioning of the bones of the body. This course 
will provide precise and detailed information on the various positions and 
demonstrate the necessity for different views to maintain correct detailed and 
proportion of parts. Emphasis will be placed on the extremities and spine of the 
body. 



* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



247 



Related Health Programs 

e. Film Critique I, li, ill, and IV — to provide a forum for review, informal 
discussion and seminars on the quality of films being produced by the student. 
An opportunity to offer him constructive criticism of his work. 

RTE 1800L APPLIED RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE I 

RTE1402C RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE II 

This course follows immediately after Radiological Technique I, and includes 
positioning of the patient, radiographic exposure, common procedures using 
contrast media, nursing procedures, techniques of pediatric radiography, and 
film critique. 

a. Radiographic Positioning II — to give the student instruction in the more 
difficult and radiographic positions, supplementing and adding to the basic 
principles of positioning as given in Radiographic Positioning I. Emphasis is 
placed on the skull and organs of the chest, abdomen, and pelvis. 

b. Principles of Radiographic Exposure II — to give the student instruction in 
the use of cones, diaphragms, collimators, filters, grids, screens, and film and 
the effect each has on the radiograph. 

c. Common Procedures Using Contrast Media — to acquaint the student with 
common procedures in radiography involving the use of contrast media, the 
equipment and media used and the reactions and contradictions of these media. 

d. Nursing Procedures — to acquaint the student with nursing procedures and 
techniques used in the general care of the patient with emphasis on the role of 
the X-ray technician in various nursing situations. 

e. Pediatric Radiography — to acquaint the student with the importance of 
having a definite method of procedure with young children; to explain its ad- 
vantages, which include the saving of film and time of t-e operator, as well as 
minimizing the amount of radiation to the patient. 

RTE 1810L APPLIED RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE II 

APB 1223 TOPOGRAPHIC ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY 

This course includes the anatomy and physiology of all vertebrates. However 
particular attention is directed to the structure and functioning of the systems 
found in man. It includes a review of anatomy from the standpoint of 
topographic anatomy and the relationship of organs to each other. The material 
is presented according to regions of the body, the stress being upon the 
location of each organ using surface landmarks and the relation of the organ to 
the other organs within the same anatomical region, (see Biology section) 
RTE 2403C RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUES III 

This advanced course goes into greater detail on positioning, radiographic 
exposure, radiation protection, special radiographic procedures, and film 
critique. 

a. Radiographic Positioning III — to positioning procedures. Non-routine 
radiography of the extremities, abdomen, the vertebral column, bones of the 
skull, paranasal sinuses, mastoid sinuses, and thoracic contents. 

b. Principles of Radiographic Exposure III — to give the student a complete 
and thorough knowledge of the manipulation of exposure factors through the 
completion of problems and experiments. To learn the basic principles needed 
to construct technique charts for all situations and all exposure factors. 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



248 



Related Health Programs 

c. Radiation Protection — this course pr ides instruction as to the various 
ways and means of protecting that part of the patient not being treated and 
other personnel in the room from the effects of ionizing radiation. Also covers 
radiation dosimetry and detection, maximum permissible doses and levels of 
radiation. 

d. Special Procedure — to acquaint the student with the specialized and 
highly technical procedures in radiography, the equipment and contrast media 
used, and the general indications for each examination. 

ITE 2850L APPLIED RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE III 

ITE2404C RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE IV 

This course is designed to give the student basic training in radiation therapy 
and nuclear medicine, intraoral radiography, equipment maintenance, depart- 
mental administration. Also, film critique IV is covered in this course. 

a. Radiation Therapy and Nuclear Medicine — this course is designed to meet 
the basic requirements for training of technicians in radiation therapy. It is 
slanted towards the student whose training is primarily in the field of diagnostic 
X-ray technology, but whose subsequent employment may include duties in 
radiation therapy. 

The student is acquainted with those commonly employed radium and 
radioactive isotopes, emphasis being placed upon the storage and handling of 
radioactive materials and the protective measures which must be taken in their 
use. Lectures are supplemented by occasional visits to the therapy department. 

b. Intraoral Radiology — to provide the student with an understanding of the 
anatomy and contours of the teeth and mouth and of the geometry of image 
formation of this area. To familiarize him with the essential equipment and 
accessories used in dental radiography. 

c. Equipment Maintenance — to give the student instruction in the detection 
and correction of simple difficulties which interfere with or prevent the proper 
function in the equipment or accessories; as well as fundamentals of preventive 
maintenance to avoid expensive breakdowns. 

d. Departmental Administration — to acquaint the student with the 
organization, function, supervision, and financial arrangements relative to 
departments of radiology. To present correct departmental intra- and inter- 
departmental relationships such as those pertaining to attitudes and policies 
relative to personnel management. 

e. To acquaint the student with certain changes that occur in disease and injury 
and their application to X-ray technology. An understanding of these should 
enable the technician to handle seriously ill or injured patients more intelligently 
and to produce more informative radiographs. This is not intended to be a 
detailed course in pathology. 

ITE2840L APPLIED RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE IV 

ITE 2860L APPLIED RADIOLOGICAL TECHNIQUE V 

Practical application of knowledge acquired in above Technique courses. Each 
student will be assigned work under direct supervision in the hospital X-ray 
department on a weekly basis. In this capacity he will receive instruction and 
gain experience in patient handling, operation of equipment for radiography, 
fluorscopy and exposure techniques. Periodic conferences will be held with 
students regarding hospital experience. Although this is a laboratory course, 
students will be encouraged to make use of textbooks, library references and 
professional publications to further their knowledge of X-ray technology. 

Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

249 



Science 

Science 

FACULTY: Dasher (Chairperson). PBJC South, Krieger. PBJC 
Glades, Phillips. PBJC North, Marsteller. 

BIOLOGY SECTION: Aldridge, Allred, Bailey, Butler, Caylor, Hart 

man, Hilliard, McCracken, Sammons 

MAJORS: Bacteriology, Biology Teacher, Conservation, General 
Biology, Marine Biology, Plant Sciences (Agriculture), 
Science Education, Water and Wastewater Technology, 
Zoology 

COURSE PREFIXES: APB, BOT, BSC, EVS, HOS, MCB, OCB, PCB, 

ZOO 

PROGRAMS: 

It is understood that the co-requisite for the laboratory is the lecture and vice versa 

that a student must enroll in both initially and if he withdraws before the 10 week 

period, he must withdraw from both lecture and lab. After the 10 week period, th« 

student may withdraw from either the lecture or the laboratory. 

GENERAL BIOLOGY (A.A. 02-296) 

BACTERIOLOGY (A.A. 02-031) 

BIOLOGY TEACHER (A.A. 02-027) 

MARINE BIOLOGY (A.A. 02-035) 

CONSERVATION (WILD LIFE) (A.A. 02033) 

SCIENCE EDUCATION (A.A. 02029) 

ZOOLOGY (A.A. 02-034) 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM: The biology curriculum is designed to prepare majors foi 
transfer to a senior institution with a minimum of difficulty. The same basic courses 
apply no matter which branch of biology is the student's final goal. However, it U 
strongly recommended that the student consult the catalog of the senior institution tc 
which he plans to transfer. The following is a minimum program: 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

BSC 1010 Principles of Biology 3 

BSC 1010L Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

BOT 1010 General Botany 1 3 

BOT 1010L General Botany I Lab 1 

or 

ZOO 1013 General Zoology (3) 

ZOO 1013L General Zoology Laboratory (1) 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry 1 3 

CHM1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 3 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

MAC 1104 College Algebra 3 

MAC 1144 Trigonometry and Aanlytic Geometry 3 

Physical Education 2 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

33 
250 



Science 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL1011 Music Appreciation (3) 

ZOO 2713 Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy I 3 

ZOO 271 3L Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy I Laboratory 1 

or 

BOT 1153 Botany II (3) 

BOT 1153L Botany II Laboratory (1) 

PCB 2063 Genetics 3 

PCB 2063L Experiments in Genetics 1 

CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry 1 3 

CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

CHM 2211 Organic Chemistry II 3 

CHM2211L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

or 

PHY 2023 General Physics I (3) 

PHY 2048L General Physics I Laboratory (1) 

PHY 2024 General Physics II (3) 

PHY 2049L General Physics II Laboratory (1) 

Literature 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

3TA2014 Statistics 3 

30 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

PLANT SCIENCES (AGRICULTURE) (A.A. 02-028) 

This program will provide the necessary General Education requirements for the first 
:wo years of college. Training emphasis required for careers in agriculture include 
Jiology, botany, chemistry, mathematics, physics, genetics, and physiology. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
BOURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

3SC 1010 Principles of Biology 3 

3SC 1010L Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

:HM 1045 General Chemistry I 3 

2HM 1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

^HM 1046 General Chemistry II 3 

HM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

i/IAC1104 College Algebra 3 

A AC 1 1 44 Trigonometry and Analytic Geometry 3 

Physical Education 2 

iOC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

OS 1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

32 
POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



251 



Science 

PLANT SCIENCES (Cont'd) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL1011 Music Appreciation (3) 

BOT1010 General Botany 1 3 

BOT 1010L General Botany I Laboratory 1 

or 

ZOO 1013 General Zoology (3) 

ZOO 1013L General Zoology Laboratory (1) 

PCB 2063* Genetics 3 

PCB 2063L* * Experiments in Genetics 1 

HES 1000* * * Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

PHY 2023 General Physics I 3 

PHY 2048L General Physics I Laboratory 1 

PHY 2024 General Physics II 3 

PHY 2049L General Physics II Laboratory 1 

Literature 3 

Elective .".... 6 

30 

**Students planning to major in the life sciences in the College of Agriculture 
University Florida, should not take genetics here. 
***HES2121 may be substituted. 
NOTE: Students planning to study Forestry at the University of Florida should include 
MAC 2400. 

WATER AND WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY (A.S. 02-199) 

This program is approved by the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation fo 

A, B or C certification in Water or Wastewater as follows: 

C level Wastewater: EVS 1 220 and EVS 1 222 

C level Water: EVS 1 220 and EVS 1 240 

B level Wastewater: EVS 1269, EVS 2233, EVS 1238 (or MAN 2000) 

B level Water: EVS 1269, EVS 1238 (or MAN 2000), EVS 2232 

A level Water and 

Wastewater: An A.S. degree in the program 02-199 

WATER AND WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY COURSES 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT! 

EVS 1220 Principles of Water & Wastewater Technology 4 

EVS 1222 Introduction to Wastewater Technology 4 

or 

EVS 1240 Introduction to Water Treatment (4) 

EVS 2242 Water Quality Control 3 

EVS 2230 Water Supply and Wastewater Control 3 

EVS 2232 Water Purification 4 

or 

EVS 2233 Wastewater Treatment (4) 

EVS 2105 Instrumentation and Controls 3 

BCN 2765 Contracts, Specifications, Codes, Estimating, 

Costs 3 

EVS 1238 Plant Management for Water/Wast ewater Operators 3 

27 
252 



ADDITIONAL COURSES FOR A.S. DEGREE 

ECO 2000 Introduction to Economics 

SUR 1001 Project Layout 

EVS 1269 Microbiology for Wastewater Technology 

EVS 1269L Microbiology for Wastewater Technology Lab 

ETD 1110C Introduction to Technical Drawing 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 

Physical Education 

POS 2041 * * American National Government , 

PSC 1341 Survey of Physical Science II 

PSC 1341 L Physical Science Laboratory 

SOC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 

MTB 1321 Technical Math I 

MTB 1322 Technical Math II 



Science 



37 



•HES2121 may be substituted. 
**POS1001 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

Applied Biology 

APB 1120 ENVIRONMENTAL CONSERVATION 

Integrates and correlates the features of the natural environment with man's 
activities. Identifies many of the ecological problems man is confronting now 
and will in the future. Lectures, demonstrations, selected field trips, and 
guidance in the completion of a conservation project are provided. 3-0-3* (of- 
fered Fall, Winter & Spring term) 
*vPB1190 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I 

(Co-requisite: APB 1190L) An introductory course in the structure and functions 
of the human body. Topics include organization of the body, cell activities, early 
embryology, tissues and skin, as well as the skeletal, muscular and nervous 
systems. 2-0-2* (offered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

RPB 1190L ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY I LAB 

(Co-requisite: APB 1190) Laboratory to accompany APB 1 190. 0-2-1 * (offered Fall, 
Winter & Spring terms)** 

RPB1191 ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II 

(Co-requisite: APB 1191L; prerequisite: APB 1190) A continuation of APB 1190. 
The circulatory, endocrine, reproductive, execretory, digestive and respiratory 
systems of the body are studied. The laboratory includes demonstrations of 
human cadaver dissection when possible. 2-0-2* (offered Fall, Winter & Summer 
terms)** 
&PB1191L ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY II LAB 

(Co-requisite: APB 1191) Laboratory to accompany APB 1191. 0-2-1* (offered Fall, 
Winter & Summer terms) 
These courses are taught in the nursing curriculum, dental health and certain 
elated health programs. 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



253 



Science 

Botany 

BOT1010 GENERAL BOTANY I 

(Prerequisite: BSC 1010 & BSC 1010L; co-requisite: BOT 1010L). An introductory 
survey of the plant kingdom with emphasis on phylogenetic relationships. 
Topics will include cytology, morphology, anatomy, physiology, and economic 
importance of plants. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

BOT1010L GENERAL BOTANY I LAB 

(Prerequisite: BSC 1010 & BSC 1010L; co-requisite: BOT 1010). The Laboratory 
exercises will correlate with the topics of the lecture. 0-2-1* (offered Fall & 
Winter terms) 

BOT 11 53 BOTANY II 

(Prerequisite: BOT 1010 and BOT 1010L) A detailed study of the vascular plants 
with particular emphasis on their taxonomy, distribution, and econdlogy. The 
advanced study of vascular plant morphology and anatomy will be stressed in 
the laboratory. Field work will include ecological studies and the preparation of 
a plant collection. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

BOT 1153L BOTANY II LABORATORY 

(Prerequisite: BOT 1010; co-requisite: BOT 1153) The laboratory exercises will 
correlate with the topics of the lecture. 0-3-1 * (offered Winter term) 

Introductory Biology 

BSC 1010 PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY 

An introduction of the principles of biology designed primarily to acquaint the 
student with the concepts of cellular biology and bio-chemistry, genetic theory, 
evolutionary principles, and ecological problems. Emphasis will be placed on 
those biological principles which man needs to better understand his role and 
responsibility to the environment. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 
BSC 1010L PRINCIPLES OF BIOLOGY LABORATORY 

(Prerequisite: or co-requisite: BSC 1010) Laboratory studies dealing with 
biochemistry, physioloav, taxonomy, morphology, genetics, and other related 
topics will be emphasized. 0-2-1 * (offered all terms) 

Horticultural Sciences 

HOS2010 GENERAL HORTICULTURE 

This course will give the home gardeners and workers in the various fields of 
horticultural practices a background in the proper development of a landscape 
plan, landscape maintenance, turf management, plant propagation, and insect 
and disease control. Field trips and laboratory demonstrations will be included 
in the presentation. Tropical fruit management will be discussed. 3-0-3* (offered 
evenings only) 

Microbiology 

MCB 1000 MICROBIOLOGY 

(Co-requisite: MCB 1000L) A study of the characteristics and importance of 
microorganisms with emphasis on identification, control, relationship to health 
and disease, and economic importance. 2-0-2* (offered Fall, Winter & Summer 
terms)** 

MCB 1000L MICROBIOLOGY LABORATORY 

(Co-requisite: MCB 1000) Laboratory to accompany MCB 1000. 0-2-1* (offered 
Fall, Winter & Summer terms) 

**These courses are taught in the nursing curriculum, dental health and certain 

related health programs. 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
254 



Science 

)ceanography: Biological 

)CB 2103 INTRODUCTION TO MARINE SCIENCE 

(Prerequisite: ZOO 1013 and ZOO 1013L; co-requisite: OCB 2103L) This is an 
introductory course in marine biology and its related fields. Lectures will cover 
such topics as common marine organisms and their ecology, fishery methods, 
and elementary oceanography. This course is designed to introduce the future 
marine biologist to organism identification, laboratory research, and field 
collecting methods. Regular field trips will be required. 3-0-3* (offered on 
demand) 
CB 2103L INTRODUCTION TO MARINE SCIENCE LABORATORY 

(Prerequisite: ZOO 1013 and ZOO 1013L; co-requisite: OCB 2103) Laboratory for 
OCB 2103. 0-2-1 * (offered upon demand) 

rocess Cell Biology 
CB2063 GENETICS 

(Prerequisite: BSC 1010) This is a study of the effects of heredity units in in- 
terplay with the environment on the development and function of organisms, 
with emphasis on human inheritance and modern biochemical genetics. This 
course is of importance to prospective teachers, social workers, medical 
students, and majors in biology. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 
CB 2063L EXPERIMENTS IN GENETICS 

(Co- or prerequisite: PCB 2063) The work consists of experimental determination 
of various genetic ratios mainly by the culture and breeding of fruit flies. 0-2-1* 
(offered Winter term) 

oology 

001013 GENERAL ZOOLOGY LECTURE 

(Prerequisite: BSC 1010 & BSC 1010L; co-requisite: ZOO 1013L) An introductory 
course dealing with the structure, functioning, embryology, and evolutionary 
relationships of representatives of the major animal phyla culminating in man. 3- 
0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

00 101 3L GENERAL ZOOLOGY LABORATORY 

(Prerequisite: BSC 1010 & BSC 1010L; co-requisite: ZOO 1013) This laboratory 
includes observation of representative groups of the animal kingdom. 0-2-1* 
(offered Fall & Winter terms) 

00 2713 COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY 

This course deals with the early embryology and the development of the organ 
systems for the main classes of vertebrates. In addition, this course discusses 
the origins and classification of the chordates. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter 
terms) 
|0O 271 3L COMPARATIVE VERTEBRATE ANATOMY LABORATORY 

The laboratory includes the examination and dissection of representatives of 
the major classes of vertebrates. The work in the laboratory includes the 
dissection of the lamprey, shark, Necturus and cat. 0-4-1 * (offered Fall & Winter 
terms) 

/ASTEWATER COURSES 

he College has applied to the Florida Department of Environmental Regulation for 
pproval of certain of its courses in the department's requirements for C, B and A 
edification. Please inquire about the status of these approvals, if they may apply in 
our particular case. 

Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

255 



Science 

WASTEWATER COURSES (Cont'd) 

EVS 1220 PRINCIPLES OF WATER AND WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY 

A course for those interested in pursuing "C" level certification in water o 
wastewater technology. This course, designed in accordance with DEF 
regulations, emphasizes fundamental hydraulics, mathematics, and plan 
management. 4-0-4* 

EVS 1222 INTRODUCTION TO WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY 

A course developed for those pursuing a career in a wastewater treatment plant 
emphasizing plant operations, laboratory analysis, and regulations. 4-0-4* 

EVS 1238 PLANT MANAGEMENT FOR WATER/WASTEWATER OPERATORS 

This course covers the basic principles of water and wastewater plan 
management, including delegation of authority, employee evaluation anc 
relationship, problem solving and plant evaluation. The broad principles o 
supervision are discussed, including guidelines for procurement expertise 
Special emphasis is placed on the personal development of the manager, in 
eluding communication skills, as well as the importance of interfacing with the 
public. 3-0-3* (offered upon demand) 

EVS 1240 INTRODUCTION TO WATER TREATMENT 

A course designed for those pursuing a career in a water treatment plant, em 
phasizing plant operations, laboratory analysis, and regulations. 4-0-4* 

EVS 1269 MICROBIOLOGY FOR WATER & WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY 

(Co-requisite: EVS 1269L) A study of basic microbiological theory as it pertain? 
to water (pathogenic microorganisms) and wastewater treatment (biologica 
filtration and aeration). 2-0-2* 

EVS 1269L MICROBIOLOGY FOR WATER & WASTEWATER TECHNOLOGY LAB 

(Co-requisite: EVS 1269) Laboratory work includes culture and staininj 
techniques as well as selected water quality tests for both water anc 
wastewater. 0-2-1 * 

EVS 2105 INSTRUMENTATION AND CONTROLS 

An elementary study of hydraulic, pneumatic, mechanical, electrical anc 
electronic control systems and components. Includes a basic description 
analysis, and explanation of operation of instrumental controls for water anc 
wastewater plants. Typical performance characteristics, accuracy, and ap- 
plications of instruments are studied. 3-0-3* 

EVS 2230 WATER SUPPLY AND WASTEWATER CONTROL 

A course designed to familiarize the student with the elementary engineering 
aspects of water supply and distribution, and of wastewater collection, removal 
and disposal. 3-0-3* 

EVS 2232 WATER PURIFICATION 

A study of basic principles of water purification including: aeration sedimen- 
tation, rapid sand filtration, chlorination, treatment chemicals, taste and odor 
control, bacteriological control, mineral control, design criteria, maintenance 
programs, and operational problems. New processes and recent developments 
are studied. Criteria, rules, regulations, forms and records associated with the 
field are considered. 4-0-4* 

EVS 2233 WASTEWATER TREATMENT 

This course is designed to familiarize the student with the elementary 
engineering aspects of design, operation, process control, and maintenance of 
wastewater treatment plants and facilities. 4-0-4* 

EVS 2242 WATER QUALITY CONTROL 

The significance and methods of analysis will be covered, with latitude for 
discussion of relative importance of each test in various plants. 3-0-3* 

*Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
256 



Science 



Science 



Winter 



CHEMISTRY SECTION: Dasher (Chairperson), Farmer, Fayssoux, 

Lesko, Sukumarabandhu, Toohey 

MAJORS: Chemistry, Chemistry Teacher, Pre-Dental, Pre-Medical, 

Pre-Optometry, Pre-Pharmacy, Pre-Podiatry, Pre- 

Veterinary 
COURSE PREFIXES: CHM 

SUGGESTED CURRICULUM: The courses outlined for the various 
programs are designed to meet the requirements for admission to 
the upper division course of study in that curriculum. 
Lecture and laboratory may be taken separately; however, taking both lecture and 
laboratory concurrently is highly recommended, but not required. 

PROGRAMS: 

CHEMISTRY (A.A. 04-076), CHEMISTRY TEACHER (A.A. 04077) 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEMESTER 

HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE Fall 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 1011 Music Appreciation (3) 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 3 

CHM1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 

HM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 

NC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

NC 1136 Freshman Communications II 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 

vlAC1104 College Algebra 3 

vlAC 1 144 Trigonometry & Analytic Geometry 

Physical Education 

OC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

OS 1001 ** Introduction to Political Science 

16 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

SHM 2120C Quantitative Analysis. 

DHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I 3 

)HM 2210L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

IHM 221 1 Organic Chemistry II 

2HM 221 1 L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 

Literature 3 

/IAC 241 1 Calculus I 3 

/IAC 2412 Calculus II 

Physical Education 1 

HY2048 General Physics with Calculus I 3 

HY 2048L General Physics with Calculus I Lab 1 

HY 2049 General Physics with Calculus II 

HY 2049L General Physics with Calculus II Lab 

15 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 

*POS2041 orAMH 2010 may be substituted. 



16 
4 



3 

1 

15 



257 



Science 

PRE-DENTAL (A.A. 04-079), PRE-MEDICAL (A.A. 04-078), PRE-PH ARMACY (A.A. 04-080), 
PREVETERINARY (A.A. 04-081) 

This curriculum will meet the minimum requirements for admission to most medical 
and dental schools. While the student may be admitted to dental schools after two 
years of pre-professional work, medical schools require at least three, usually four 
years of pre-professional work. In all cases, the student must correspond with the 
school to which he is planning to transfer in order that he may know the specific 
requirements foradmjssion thereto. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 



COURSE 

ARH 1000 

or 
MUL1011 
BSC1010 
BSC1010L 
ZOO 1013 
ZOO1013L 
CHM 1045 
CHM 1045L 
CHM 1046 
CHM 1046L 
ENC1103 
ENC1136 
HES 1000* 
MAC 1104 
MAC 1144 



CHM 2210 
CHM2210L 
CHM 2211 
CHM 221 1L 
PHY 2048 
PHY 2048L 
PHY 2049 
PHY 2049L 
ZOO 2713 
ZOO 271 3L 
MAC 2411 
POS1001** 
SOC 1200 



TITLE Fall 

Art Appreciation 3 

Music Appreciation (3) 

Principles of Biology 3 

Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

General Zoology 

General Zoology Laboratory 

General Chemistry I 3 

General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

General Chemistry II 

General Chemistry II Laboratory 

Freshman Communications I 3 

Freshman Communications II 

Perspectives on Healthful Living 

College Algebra 3 

Trigonometry & Analytic Geometry 

Physical Education 

17 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Organic Chemistry I : . . 3 

Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

Organic Chemistry II 

Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 

General Physics with Calculus I 3 

General Physics I Laboratory 1 

General Physics with Calculus II 

General Physics II Laboratory 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy 3 

Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy Laboratory 1 

Calculus I 3 

Introduction to Political Science 

Introduction to the Social Sciences . ; ........ 3 

Literature 

Physical Education 



17 



18 



15 



•HES 2121 may be substituted. 

V POS2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 



258 



Science 

PRE-PODIATRY (A.A. 04-083) 

This curriculum will meet the minimum requirements for admission to most colleges 

of podiatry. A survey of these requirements has been conducted by the Chemistry 

Section by correspondence and from information published by the American Podiatry 

Association. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 

COURSE TITLE Fall Winter 

BSC 1010 Principles of Biology 3 

BSC1010L Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

ZO0 1013 General Zoology 3 

ZOO 1013L General Zoology Laboratory 1 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 3 

CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 3 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAC 1 104 College Algebra 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

17 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

3HM 2200C* * * Principles of Organic Chemistry 4 

Literature 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

PHY 2023 General Physics I 3 

PHY 2048L General Physics I Laboratory 1 

PHY 2024 General Physics II 3 

PHY 2049L General Physics II Laboratory 1 

Electives**** 7 3 

15 15 

*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
**POS2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

**CHM 2210, CHM 2210L & CHM 2211, CHM 2211L may be substituted, if 8 hours of 
organic chemistry are needed for admission by a particular college of podiatry. 
* *PSY 2012, EGC 2120 are recommended. 



259 



Science 

PRE-OPTOMETRY (A.A. 04-082) 

This curriculum will meet the minimum requirements for admission to most colleges 
of optometry. All colleges place emphasis on mathematics, physics, chemistry and 
biology. Since some colleges also require additional courses in psychology or foreign 
language, it is suggested that the student contact directly the school of his choice to 
determine what modifications might be needed. Some information is available in the 
Career Information and Study Center, North SAC Building. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 

HOURS CREDIT 

COURSE TITLE Fall Winter 

BSC 1010 Principles of Biology 3 

BSC 1010L Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

ZO0 1013 General Zoology 3 

ZOO 101 3L General Zoology Laboratory 1 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 3 

CHM 1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 3 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

MAC 11 44 Trigonometry & Analytic Geometry 3 

MAC 241 1 Calculus I 3 

Physical Education 1 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS1001* Introduction to Political Science 3 

18 17 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I 3 

CHM 2210L Organic Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

CHM 221 1 * * Organic Chemistry II 3 

CHM 221 1L Organic Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

Literature 3 

HES 1000* * * Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAC 2412 Calculus II 3 

Physical Education 1 

PHY 2048 General Physics I with Calculus I 3 

PHY 2048L General Physics I Laboratory 1 

PHY 2049 General Physics II with Calculus II 3 

PHY2049L General Physics II Laboratory 1 

Electives**** • 3 

16 15 

*POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

**For some colleges of optometry, the chemistry requirements may be met by 

taking CHM 2200 instead of CHM 2210, CHM 2211. For a few schools, no organic 

chemistry is required, but is recommended. 

***HES2121 may be substituted. 

****Psychology recommended by most optometry schools. To reduce total hours, a 

student may omit the 3 hours of electives. 

260 



COURSE DESCRIPTIONS Chemistry Science 

CHM 1015 PRINCIPLES OF CHEMISTRY 

An introduction to the principles of chemistry for students who do not need the 
more intensive courses. Covers the structure of atoms, periodic law, pH, and 
other important concepts of general chemistry, and progresses through 
elementary organic chemistry into certain areas of biochemistry. Includes some 
chemistry relevant to health and the numerous chemical products in use today. 
Serves as co- or prerequisite for CHM 1015L 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 
RHM1015L LABORATORY FOR CHM 1015 

(Co- or prerequisite: CHM 1015) A study of metric measurements, physical and 
chemical properties, elements and compounds, and many laboratory techniques 
and skills. 0-2-1 * (offered on demand) 

3HM1045 GENERAL CHEMISTRY I 

(It is suggested that the student has completed CHM 1015 and MAT 1033 or 
higher, or one unit of high school chemistry with a grade of "B" or better and 
three units of high school mathematics; also, that CHM 1045L be taken con- 
currently.) The first half of a two-semester sequence which includes a thorough 
study of the theories, laws and principles of general chemistry and their ap- 
plication. Mathematical relationships and problem solving are stressed. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

:HM 1045L GENERAL CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY 

(Co-requisite: CHM 1045) Laboratory for CHM 1045. 0-3-1* (offered Fall, Winter 
and Spring terms) 

:HM1046 GENERAL CHEMISTRY II 

(Prerequisite: CHM 1045 or equivalent; co-requisite: CHM 1045L or CHM 1046L). 
Continuation of CHM 1045. The second half of a two-course sequence. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall, Winter and Summer terms) 

:HM 1046L GENERAL CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY 

(Co-requisite: CHM 1046) Laboratory for CHM 1046. 0-3-1 * (offered Fall, Winter & 
Summer terms) 

;HM 2200C PRINCIPLES OF ORGANIC CHEMISTRY 

(Prerequisites: CHM 1015 and CHM 1015L with "C" or better; or CHM 1045, CHM 
1045L; CHM 1046, CHM 1046L.) A semester course in the fundamentals of 
organic chemistry with emphasis on the structures and functions of organic 
compounds, and the chemistry related to polymers, fibers, dyes, pesticides, 
vitamins, nutrition and metabolism. 3-4-4* 

&HM2120C quantitative analysis 

(Prerequisite: CHM 1046 & 1046L or equivalent) The theory and practice of exact 
methods of chemical analysis, including volumetric, gravimetric, and an in- 
troduction to instrumental methods. 2-6-4* 
HM2210 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I 

(Prerequisite: CHM 1046 & 1046L; co-requisite: 2210L). First half of a two- 
semester sequence, covering fundamental concepts, nomenclature, synthesis 
and reactions of the many classes of organic compounds, with emphasis on 
molecular structure and reaction mechanisms. 3-0-3* ( Fall & Spring terms) 

:HM 2210L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY I LABORATORY 

(Co-requisite: CHM 2210) 0-4-1 * (offered Fall & Spring terms) 

JHM2211 ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II 

(Prerequisite: CHM 2210; co-requisite: CHM 221 1 L) Continuation of CHM 2210. 3- 
0-3* (offered Winter & Summer terms) 

IHM 221 1L ORGANIC CHEMISTRY II LABORATORY 

(Co-requisite: CHM 2211) 0-4-1 * (offered Winter & Summer terms) 
Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

261 



Science 

Science 

PHYSICS AND PHYSICAL SCIENCE SECTION: 

FACULTY: Dasher (Chairperson), Galbraith, Ramos 

MAJORS: Physics, Geology, Astronomy, Physical Sciences, 

Meteorology 
COURSE PREFIXES: AST, GLY, PHY, PSC 
Lecture and laboratory may be taken separately; however, taking both lecture and 
laboratory concurrently is highly recommended, but not required. 

PROGRAMS: 

PHYSICS (A.A. 18-401), PHYSICAL SCIENCES (A.A. 18-405), ASTRONOMY (A.A. 11 
402), GEOLOGY (A.A. 18-403), METEOROLOGY (A.A. 18-404) 

This physics program is designed for the above average student. Other students 
desiring to have a major in physics must plan to take five terms of study. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 

HOURS CREDIT 

COURSE TITLE Fall Winter 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

CHM 1045 General Chemistry I 3 

CHM1045L General Chemistry I Laboratory 1 

CHM 1046 General Chemistry II 3 

CHM 1046L General Chemistry II Laboratory 1 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1 136 Freshman Communications II 3 

FRE1100 Elementary French 1 3 

FRE1101 Elementary French II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MAC 241 1 Calculus I 3 

MAC 2412 Calculus II 3 

Physical Education : 1 1 

16 17 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Literature 3 

MAC 2413 Calculus III 4 

MAP 2302 Differential Equations 3 

COP 21 10 Mathematical Programming 3 

PHY 2048 General Physics with Calculus I 3 

PHY 2048L General Physics with Calculus I Lab 1 

PHY 2049 General Physics with Calculus II 3 

PHY2049L General Physics with Calculus II Lab 1 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

Electives 3 3 

17 16 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 

* * POS 2041 or AM H 2010 may be substituted. 

NOTE: Students planning to go to the University of Florida should take 7 hours oi 

biology. 

262 



Science 




BOURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

istronomy 

\ST 1002 DESCRIPTIVE ASTRONOMY 

Introductory survey of the universe, the solar system, structure and motion of 
the earth and moon; formation and decay of stars; planetary motion; physical 
nature of the planets, comets and meteors; basic laws of Astronomy, nebulae, 
galactic structure. Lectures, discussion and observations. 3-0-3* (offered on 
demand) 

eology 

LY1000 DESCRIPTIVE GEOLOGY 

A study of the materials, structure and surface of Earth and processes which 
have produced or shaped them. Related laboratory exercises, demonstrations, 
and local field trips are included. 3-0-3* (offered on demand) 

HY2023 GENERAL PHYSICS I 

(Prerequisite: MAC 1104 or MTB 1321 or MTB 1322) This course in physics is 
designed for pre-medical, pre-dental, pre-pharmacy, business, technical and 
liberal arts students not majoring in engineering, physical science or 
mathematics. This is the initial part of a two-term sequence and must be taken 
before PHY 2024. Topics included are: introduction to scalar and vector quan- 
tities, equilibrium, laws of motion, translation and rotation, energy, heat, work 
general gas law, thermal concepts and laws of physics with particular attention 
to application to the environment and daily experience of the average person. 
(Laboratory PHY 2048L) 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

HY2024 GENERAL PHYSICS II 

(Prerequisite: PHY 2023) This is the second term of the general physics 
sequence. Topics studied are: electrostatics, electric current, resistance, 
electromagnetism, magnetic circuits, electro-magnetic induction, capacitance, 
alternating current, optics, light, optical instruments, the atom, the photon, 
matter waves, atoms and valence, quantum numbers applied to the periodic 
table, radioactivity. (Laboratory PHY 2049L) 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & 
Summer terms) 

Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

263 



Science 

PHY 2048 GENERAL PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I 

(Co-requisite: MAC 2411 and PHY 2048L) This is the first part of a two-term 
sequence in general physics for students with an above-average mathematical 
background. It is designed for students in engineering and science. Topics 
included are: vector manipulation, statics, fundamentals of motion, force and 
translation, torque and rotation, energy, elasticity and harmonic motion, fluids 
at rest and in motion, gases, heat, transfer, change of phase, thermal behavior of 
gases, and thermo-dynamics. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

PHY2048L GENERAL PHYSICS I AND GENERAL PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS I 
LABORATORY 

The laboratory portion of the course, PHY 2023 and PHY 2048. It introduces the 
student to basic ideas of measurement, fundamentals of the analysis of ex- 
perimental data and laboratory methods. 0-2-1* (offered Fall, Winter & Spring 
terms) 

PHY 2049 GENERAL PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II 

(Prerequisite: PHY 2048; co-requisite: MAC 2412 and PHY 2049L) This is the 
second term of the general physics with calculus sequence. Topics included 
are: electrostatics, electric current and resistance of circuits, elec 
tromagnetism, magnetic circuits, wave motion and sound, reflection and 
refraction of light, lenses and mirrors, spectra and color, interference and dif- 
fraction and polarization. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Summer terms) 

PHY2049L GENERAL PHYSICS II AND GENERAL PHYSICS WITH CALCULUS II 
LABORATORY 

The laboratory portion of the course PHY 2024 and 2049. It is designed to 
illustrate various phenomena discussed in the lectures. 0-2-1* (offered Fall, 
Winter & Summer terms) 

Physical Science 

PSC 1341 SURVEY OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE II 

(Prerequisite: MGF 11 13 or adequate score on placement test) Physical Science I 
is not a prerequisite for this course. This course is a study of the basic concepts 
of physics and chemistry (with their application to environmental imperatives). 
Recommended for students planning to take chemistry and physics who have 
not had these courses in high school. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Summer 
terms) 

PSC 1 341 L PHYSICAL SCIENCE LABORATORY 

(Co- or prerequisite: PSC 1341) The laboratory is a combination of individual 
work by the student, lecture demonstration by the instructor (for those ex- 
periments where advanced operational techniques are necessary for the 
student, if he is to verify the agreement between theory and practice), and 
students working together in groups on certain basic principle experiments 
which involve introductory chemical and physical principles. 0-2-1* (offered Fall, 
Winter & Summer terms) 

PSC 1513 SURVEY OF PHYSICAL SCIENCE I 

This is an introductory course in science including the study of astronomy, 
meteorology, geology and oceanography. Environmental imperatives such as 
the earth as an energy system, air pollution, sound pollution, soil and grassland 
conservation, water supply, demand and pollution are viewed by using physical 
scientific principles and concepts. No mathematics beyond ratio and proportion 
and arithmetic is required. There are no science prerequisites. 3-0-3* (offered all 
terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 
264 



Social Science 



Social Science 



FACULTY: Bottosto (Chairperson), Becherer, Bowser, Dampier, 
Daughterly, Freedman, Haynes, Kochel, Matthews, 
Myatt, O'Neill, Payne, Pugh, Robinson, Salisbury, 
Yinger. PBJC North, Johnston, Meldon. PBJC South, 
Bruton, Mooney. PBJC Glades, Richmond. 

MAJORS: Early Childhood Education, Education (Elementary 
Level), Education (Secondary Level), Geography, 
Government and Foreign Service, History, International 
Studies, Philosophy, Political Science, Pre-Law, Pre- 
Ministry, Psychology, Social Science, Social Science 
Teacher, Welfare Worker 

COURSE PREFIXES: AMH, ANT, ASN, CPO, DEP, EDF, EDP, EEC, 
GEO, EGC, LAH, MAF, PHI, POS, PSY, REL, SOP, SOC, SSI, 
STD, WOH 

PROGRAMS: Social Science is essentially a study of human society 
— that is it deals with the relationships of persons as members 
of a group or groups. Individuals form groups to obtain common 
goals — in education, religion, recreation, and so on. Since the 
common wants of mankind are many and varied, the group 
activities needed to satisfy those wants are correspondingly 
numerous. As these group activities have come under study, the 
social sciences have multiplied from a few recognized general 
studies to many specialized ones, each with numerous sub- 
divisions. The Department of Social Science at Palm Beach 
Junior College is organized expressly to meet the needs of 
those students who come from a wide variety of backgrounds 
and are headed towards a wide variety of professions and oc- 
cupations. While the major emphasis at Palm Beach Junior 
College is with programs in general studies, it should be em- 
phasized that the faculty within the Department of Social 
Science is available to assist those students who express a 
specific interest within the Department of Social Science. 
Accordingly, students are expected to complete the General 
Education requirements outlined in the section "How to 
Choose Your Program" and to select those additional courses 
of special interest to them in meeting the immediate needs, but 
also the particular requirements for a degree at the senior 
college of their choice. Academic advisors are assigned to 
those students who indicate a desire to pursue a program 
currently offered within the Department of Social Science. 



265 



Social Science 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (A.A. 14-344) 

Because of a growing demand on college campuses throughout the country for 
programs to prepare teachers in early childhood education, a cooperative program for 
directors and teachers of public, private, and church-related nursery schools, kin- 
dergartens and day-care centers has been developed by Palm Beach Junior College. 
The program is planned to provide work for teachers in service who do not hold a 
degree and who have not had necessary training in early childhood education. The 
program also provides work for teachers who hold degrees, but who are not trained for 
work with young children. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
COURSE TITLE Fall Winter 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

EEC 1001 * Early Childhood Education 3 

EEC 2530 Directed Observation & Participation 1 3 

EEC 2531 Directed Observation & Participation I Lab 3 

SOC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

EEC2532** Directed Observation & Participation II 3 

EEC 2533 Directed Observation & Participation II Lab 2 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

POS1001*** on to Political Science 3 



•Suggested electives: LIS 1580, HUN 1201. 
*HES2121 may be substituted. 



15 14 

*EEC 1001 is a prerequisite or co-requisite of EEC 2530. 
"Prerequisites: EEC 1001, EEC 2530. 
***POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

DAA 2160 Fundamentals of Interpretive Movement 1 

FSS1112 Foods for Children 3 

MGF1113 General Education Mathematics I or higher 3 

EGC 2120 Personality Development 3 

Literature 3 

Science 6 

HES 1000* * Perspectives on Healthful Living . 2 

Physical Education 1 

DEP2102 Child Growth & Development 3 

Elective* 5 



18 15 



266 



Social Science 




EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (A.S. 14-342) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 



COURSE 

ENC1103 
EDF 1005 
EEC 1001 
EEC 2530 
EEC 2531 
ENC1136 
EEC 2532* 
EEC 2533 
HUN 1201 
DA A 2160 
PSY2012 



TITLE 

Freshman Communications I 

Introduction to Education 

Early Childhood Education 

Directed Observation & Participation I 

Directed Observation & Participation I Lab . 

Freshman Communications II 

Directed Observation & Participation II ... . 
Directed Observation & Participation II Lab 

Elements of Nutrition 

Fundamentals of Interpretive Movement. . . 
General Psychology 



SEMESTER 
HOURS CREDIT 
Fall Winter 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 

3 
3 
2 
3 
1 
3 



15 



15 



267 



Social Science 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (Cont'd) 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

BSC 1010 Principles of Biology 3 

MUT 1001 Fundamentals of Music 3 

EGC 2120 Personality Development 3 

Physical Education 1 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

HES 1000** Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

HES 1400 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 1 

DEP2102 Child Growth & Development 3 

MAF 2001 Family Relationships 3 

MGF 1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

POS1001*** Introduction to Political Science 3 

Electives 4 

15 17 

* Prerequisites: EEC 1001, EEC 2530. 
**HES2121 may be substituted. 
* * * POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION AIDES (CT 14-343) 
(Achievement Certificate Program) 

The Early Childhood Education Certificate Program is designed to prepare students 
professionally for their roles as early childhood teacher aides. Students must com- 
plete the thirty hours listed with an overall grade-point average of "C" or better in the 
program. 

FIRST TERM 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

EEC 1001 * Early Childhood Education 3 

EEC 2530 Directed Observation & Participation 1 3 

EEC 2531 Directed Observation & Participation I Lab 3 

HUN 1201 Elements of Nutrition 3 

HES 1000 Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

17 
*EEC 1001 is a prerequisite or co-requisite of EEC 2530. 

SECOND TERM 

DAA 2160 Fundamentals of Interpretive Movement 1 

DEP 2102 Child Growth & Development 3 

EEC 2532** Directed Observation & Participation II 3 

EEC 2533 Directed Observation & Participation II Lab 2 

HES 1400 Standard First Aid and Personal Safety 1 

Physical Education 1 

PSY 2012 General Psychology. 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

17 
** Prerequisites: EEC 1001, EEC 2530. 



268 



Social Science 

EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (Montessori Specialization) 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

EEC 2940 Montessori Teaching Practicum 1 3 

EEC 2941 Montessori Teaching Practicum II 3 

Early Childhood majors may also elect to specialize in the Montessori Method. In order 

to receive the Certificate of Competency in the Montessori Method, an internship 

period covering two terms will be required for a total of thirty hours. 

Students who hold the bachelor's degree or above will be eligible to receive the full 

teaching certificate in the Montessori Method after satisfactorily completing course 

EEC 1001, EEC 2530, EEC 2531, EEC 2532, EEC 2533 and the nine-month internship 

requirement. 

EDUCATION (ELEMENTARY LEVEL) (A.A. 14-329) 

Academic advisement is required within the Social Science Department in order to 
satisfy the particular needs of individual students. Senior college choice may 
necessitate some changes, including a rearrangement of the program. 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 
MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

Science : 6 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

EDF 1005 Introduction to Education 3 

MGF1113* General Education Math I 3 

Physical Education 2 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

32 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

Literature 6 

GE0 1010 Principles of Geography & Conservation 3 

HES 1000* * * Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

WOH 1012 Ancient & Medieval Civilizations 3 

WOH 1022 Modern Civilizations 3 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

DEP2102* Child Growth and Development 3 

Electives* * * * 7 

30 
*These courses satisfy basic certification requirements for teaching in Florida. 
They may, however, be acceptable only as electives to some state college and 
universities to which the student may transfer. 

**POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
■*** HES 2121 may be substituted. 
****Suggested electives: Foreign Languages, PH1 1100, EGC2120 



269 



Social Science 

INTERNATIONAL STUDIES (A.A. 14-333) 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

ASN 2000 Asian Studies 3 

ECO 2013 Principles of Economics I 3 

ECO 2023 Principles of Economics II 3 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

LAH 2130 Latin American History-Colonial Period 3 

LAH 2131 Latin American History-National Period 3 

MGF 1113 General Education Mathematics I 3 

POS 1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

CPO 2040 Comparative Governments 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

SPN 1 100* * * Elementary Spanish 1 3 

SPN 1 101 * * * Elementary Spanish II 3 

SPN 2200*** Intermediate Spanish 1 3 

SPN 2201 * * * Intermediate Spanish II 3 

Literature 3 

Natural Science 6 

Physical Education 2 

Elective 3 



64 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 
**AMH 2010 or POS 2041 may be substituted. 
* * * French may be substituted. 

PRELAW (A.A. 14-332) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC 1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

MGF 1113 General Education Math I ... 3 

Physical Education 2 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS 1001 Introduction to Political Science 3 

Science 6 

Foreign Language 6 

32 



270 



Social Science 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL1011 Music Appreciation (3) 

Literature 6 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

AMH2010 U.S. History to 1865 3 

AMH2020 U.S. History from 1865 to Present 3 

PH1 1100 Art of Thinking 3 

POS 2041 American National Government 3 

Foreign Language 6 

Elective 1 

30 
*HES2121 may be substituted. 

PRE-MINISTRY AND PHILOSOPHY (A.A. 14-334) 

FRESHMAN YEAR 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

BSC 1010 Principles of Biology 3 

BSC 1010L Principles of Biology Laboratory 1 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Commuications II . 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on HealthfuI'Living 2 

MUL1011 Music Appreciation 3 

MGF 1113 General Education Math I 3 

PEL 1011 Team Activities 1 

Physical Education 1 

PH1 1000 Introduction to Philosophy 3 

REL1210 Old Testament 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

Foreign Language 6 

35 
SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ENL2015 English Literature to 1660 3 

POS 2041 American National Government 3 

PSC1513 Survey of Physical Science I 3 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

REL1243 New Testament 3 

REL2300 Religions of the World 3 

SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 3 

Foreign Language 6 

27 
*HES 2121 may be substituted. 



271 



Social Science 

EDUCATION (SECONDARY LEVEL) (A.A.) 

The student planning to teach at the secondary level in an academic area should seek 
counseling from the department of his major field. In consultation with his advisor, the 
student must make certain that his program will satisfy his needs for certification as 
well as meet the specific requirements of the senior college to which he will transfer to 
complete his degree program. 

GENERAL SOCIAL SCIENCE (A.A. 14-326)'; GEOGRAPHY (A.A. 14-336)'; GOVERN- 
MENT-FOREIGN SERVICE (A.A. 14-335) 3 ; HISTORY (A.A. 14-327)'); POLITICAL 
SCIENCE (A.A. 14-339)'); SOCIAL SCIENCE TEACHER (A.A. 14-328)'; WELFARE 
WORKER (A.A. 14-330); ANTHROPOLOGY (A.A. 14-324); SOCIOLOGY (A.A. 14-325) 

SEMESTER 
COURSE TITLE HOURS CREDIT 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

ENC 1103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

Literature 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

MGF1113 General Education Math I 3 

STA 2014 Statistics 3 

Physical Education '. 2 

SOC 1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences 3 

POS 1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

Science 6 

Foreign Languages— Spanish, French 12 

Electives 16 

*HES 2121 may be substituted. 62 

* * POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 

1. Recommended electives: ECO 2103, WOH 1012, WOH 1022, PHI 1000, GEO 1010, 
PSY 2012, SPC 1600, ANT 2000, SOC 2000, ASN 2000, AMH 2580. 

2. Recommended electives: GEO 1010, WOH 1012, WOH 1022, PSY 2102, MAC 1104, 
MAC 1144, SUR 2100C, SUR 2610C, SUR 2201C, SUR 2300C, ECO 2013, ECO 2023, 
ASN 2000, AMH 2580. 

3. Recommended electives: ART 1201, WOH 1012, WOH 1022, AMH 2010, AMH 2020, 
LAH 2130, LAH 2131, GEO 1010, POS 2041, POS 2112, ECO 2013, LIT 2215, LIT 
2224, ANT 2000, SOC 2000, ASN 2000, AMH 2580. 

4. Recommended electives: WOH 1012, WOH 1022, AMH 2010, AMH 2020, LAH 2130, 
LAH 2131, GEO 1010, REL 2300, POS 2041, ANT 2000, SOC 2000, ASN 2000, AMH 
2580. 

5. Recommended electives: WOH 1012, WOH 1022, AMH 2010, AMH 2020, GEO 1010, 
ECO 2013, PH1 1000, ANT 2000, SOC 2000, ASN 2000, AMH 2580. 

6. Recommended electives: WOH 1012, WOH 1022, GEO 1010, AMH 2010, AMH 2020, 
ECO 2013, POS 2041, POS 2112, CCJ 1100, PSY 2102, DEP 2102, EDF 1005, SPC 
1600, SOC 2020, ANT 2000, SOC 2000, ASN 2000, AMH 2580. 

7. Recommended electives: ECO 2013, ECO 2023, WOH 1012, WOH 1022, MAF 2001, 
POS 2112, CCJ 1100, PSY 2012, EGC 2120, DEP 2102, PHI 1000, FSS 1210C, CTE 
1310C, AMH 2010, AMH 2020, POS 2041, SPC 1600, SOC 2020, ANT 2000, SOC 
2000, ASN 2000, AMH 2580. 

NOTE: Senior college choice may necessitate some changes, including a 
rearrangement of the program. 

272 



Social Science 

PSYCHOLOGY — (A.A. 14-331) 

FRESHMAN YEAR SEMESTER 

HOURS CREDIT 

COURSE TITLE Fall Winter 

ENC 1 103 Freshman Communications I 3 

ENC1136 Freshman Communications II 3 

HES 1000* Perspectives on Healthful Living 2 

Science 3 3 

MGF1113 General Education Math I 3 

Physical Education 1 1 

PSY 2012 General Psychology 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

SOC1200 Introduction to the Social Sciences. 3 

15 16 

SOPHOMORE YEAR 

ARH 1000 Art Appreciation 3 

or 

MUL 101 1 Music Appreciation (3) 

Literature 3 

STA2014 Statistics 3 

EGC 2120 Personality Development 3 

DEP2102 Child Growth & Development 3 

POS1001** Introduction to Political Science 3 

SOP 2740 Feminist Psychology 3 

Foreign Language 3 3 

Electives 4 

' 15 16 

•HES2121 may be substituted. 
**POS 2041 or AMH 2010 may be substituted. 
COURSE DESCRIPTIONS 

AMH 2010 UNITED STATES HISTORY TO 1865 

This course is concerned with the extension of European culture into the 
Western Hemisphere, the growth and development of the thirteen English 
colonies, and intensive study of the Constitution of the United States, and the 
early national period of the United States to the end of the Civil War. 3-0-3* 
(offered Fall term) 

AMH 2020 UNITED STATES HISTORY FROM 1865 TO THE PRESENT 

A continuation of AMH 2010, this course emphasizes the development of the 
United States into a great world power with more detailed studies of internal, 
economic, social, political and cultural movements and forces. 3-0-3* (offered 
Winter term) 

AMH 2580 AMERICAN MINORITIES TODAY 

This course will explore historically and examine currently the principal minority 
groups in American life today, tracing the developments and contributions, 
values, character, heritage, social structure, etc. of each minority studied. There 
will be an examination of the relations among ethnic and racial groups and the 
general attitude of mainstream Americans toward these groups, focusing on 
ethnic prejudice, hostility, identity, solidarity and power movements. Minority 
groups to be surveyed are: Black Americans (major emphasis), native American 
Indians, American women, Mexican-Americans, Puerto Rican-Americans (briefly 
surveyed), Japanese-Chinese and other Asian Americans. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & 
Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

273 



Social Science 

ANT 2000 INTRODUCTION TO ANTHROPOLOGY 

(Prerequisite: SOC 1200) This course provides an introduction to the functional 
study of man; concepts of human development, pre-history, culture, comparison 
in human variation, structure and function in social organization, synthesis of 
biological, cultural and social factors. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

ASN 2000 ASIAN STUDIES 

This course provides for the comprehensive study of the development of the 
modern Soviet State and the Chinese Peoples Republic, and includes 
familiarization with Russian and Chinese culture, history, and government. The 
course also traces the movement and development of Russian and Chinese 
communism, including political theories and practices, social implications, the 
conduct of foreign affairs and associated programs and techniques in current 
world affairs. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

CPO2040 COMPARATIVE GOVERNMENTS 

A multinational analysis of political institutions and processes which examines 
political systems with common and diverse elements. Structure, process, 
domestic and foreign policies, and regional roles are considered in Britain, 
France, Germany, and Canada. 3-0-3* 

DEP 2102 CHILD GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT 

(Prerequisite: PSY 2012) Stressing the developing self of the child, this course 
explores the physiological, social, emotional, and intellectual natures of 
children. It includes a survey of problematic behavior and the application of 
principles and achievements in the field of psychology as these contribute to 
the personal development and general welfare to the individual child. Ob- 
servations of children from the pre-school level through high school are in- 
cluded. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

EDF 1005 INTRODUCTION TO EDUCATION (Teaching)** 

An introduction to the nature of teaching in the public schools of the United 
States. Topics included are: planning and preparation for teaching; roles and the 
responsibilities of teachers; relationship between schools and society; 
organization, financing and control of public schools; historical perspectives; 
and the aims and objectives of education as a social institution. 3-0-3* (offered 
Fall/ Winter terms) 

EDP 2002 EDUCATIONAL PSYCHOLOGY 

(Prerequisite: PSY 2012 or permission of the instructor) This course is 
specifically designed to aid the classroom teacher in gaining an understanding 
of the basic psychological principle which will place him in a favorable position 
in dealing with the varied problems in a classroom situation. It particularly 
emphasizes the intellectual, social, emotional and physical factors of growth 
and development as these relate to the learning process (offered evenings only) 
3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

**NOTE: The following will apply to ALL students enrolling in Palm Beach Junior 

College who plan to complete professional programs in Teacher Education at Florida 

Atlantic University leading to certification to teach in Florida. 
EDF 1005 Introduction to Education (Teaching) 
SPC 1600 Fundamentals of Speech 
PSY 201 2 General Psychology 
DEP 2102 Child Growth and Development 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 



274 



Social Science 

EEC 1001 EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATION (Emphasis Montessori) 

This course provides an intensive investigation of the various theories, 
philosophies, programs and methods in Early Childhood Education. Major 
emphasis is given to the Montessori philosophy, its relevance to current early 
learning theories, and the enhancement of learning experiences for pre-school 
and primary children. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

EEC 2530 EARLY CHILDHOOD DIRECTED OBSERVATION & PARTICIPATION I 

(Co-requisite: EEC 2530) The course provides 2 hours per week on campus for 
troduce the student to Montessori and other early-learning materials. Op- 
portunities to observe the demonstration of materials and student practice with 
these materials with the early learner in a variety of instructional settings will be 
provided. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

EEC 2531 EARLY CHILDHOOD DIRECTED OBSERVATION & PARTICIPATION I LAB 
(Co-requisite: EEC 2530) The course provides 2 hours per week on campus for 
the student to observe the demonstration of materials and to practice with these 
materials. The 4 hours per week will provide the student actual teaching ex- 
perience in an approved Early Childhood Education Center. The student will be 
working under the supervision of a college instructor and an approved 
cooperating teacher during internship. 0-6-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

EEC 2532 EARLY CHILDHOOD DIRECTED OBSERVATION & PARTICIPATION II 

(Prerequisite: EEC 1001, EEC 2530, EEC 2531; co-requisite: EEC 2533). This 
course is a continuation of EEC 2530. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

EEC 2533 EARLY CHILDHOOD DIRECTED OBSERVATION & PARTICIPATION II 
LAB 
(Co-requisite: EEC 2532). The course provides 2 hours per week on campus for 
the student to observe the demonstration of materials and practice with these 
materials. The other 2 hours per week, the student will be working under the 
supervision of a college instructor and an approved cooperating teacher during 
the internship. 0-4-2* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

EEC 2940 MONTESSORI TEACHING PRACTICUM I 

This course is designed to give the student actual teaching experience in an 
approved Montessori classroom. The student will be working under the 
supervision of an instructor who is an approved cooperating Montessori teacher 
during his internship. 0-15-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

EEC 2941 MONTESSORI TEACHING PRACTICUM II 

This course is a continuation of EEC 2940. 0-15-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

EGC 2120 PERSONALITY DEVELOPMENT AND ADJUSTMENT 

(Prerequisite: PSY 2012) This course is a summary of the theories, methods and 
research of psychologists, organized on the basis of personality as a science. 
The goals, theories and methods of the science first are introduced and then a 
variety of reactions to the inevitable psychological problems encountered 
throughout life are explored, the application of psychological principles utilizes 
techniques of self-management in relationship to personal assessment, sen- 
sitivity to the needs of others, and effective adjustment. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, 
Winter & Spring terms) 

GEO 1010 PRINCIPLES OF GEOGRAPHY AND CONSERVATION 

This course is an introduction to cultural and world geography through a study 
of selected regions. Ecological and conservational problems are emphasized. 
The course also includes an explanation of geographical materials and their 
uses. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

275 



Social Science 

LAH 2130 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY — COLONIAL PERIOD 

This course surveys the social, political, economic, and military background of 
Latin America. Beginning with the pre-Columbian era, it proceeds through the 
discoveries, conquests, and colonization of the continent. Emphasis is placed 
upon the cultural background of Latin America and the role played by Western 
European institutions in its development. 3-0-3* (offered Fall term) 

LAH 2131 LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY - NATIONAL PERIOD 

This course begins with the background of the wars for independence and 
proceeds to present day Latin America. It surveys the histories of the countries 
of Latin America, dealing with political, diplomatic, social, and economic forces 
which shaped these cultures. Emphasis is placed upon the development of 
governmental institutions and the emerging democratic forces. 3-0-3* (offered 
Winter term) 

MAF 2001 MARRIAGE AND FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS 

A functional course designed to examine the inter-relationships between the 
biological, socio-psychological and culture aspects of human sexual behavior 
and how changing sexual attitudes and behavior are related to social change in 
general. Emphasis is placed upon the changing contemporary factors related to 
development and expression of the varieties of human intimacy, patterns of 
attraction and living arrangements both in and out of marriage and family 
context. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

MAF 2002 AMERICAN FAMILIES IN TRANSITION 

The family as a basic institution provides individuals with an anchor in society 
and a sense of identity. Current issues, including history, psychology, 
psychiatry, and sociology will be examined. 3-0-3* 

PH1 1000 INTRODUCTION TO PHILOSOPHY (Taught in Social Science Dept.) 

This course is designed to acquaint the student with the nature of philosophy, 
its methods and some of the major problems with which it has been concerned 
from the pre-Socratic era to the present. Special attention is given to the source 
of ideas and their relationship to science, art, religion and socio-political 
developments. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

PH1 1100 THE ART OF THINKING (Taught in Communications Department) 

The principal objects of this course are to help the student think with more 
accuracy, clarity and completeness, and to help him apply his knowledge in 
analyzing the thinking of others as expressed in speech and print. 3-0-3* (offered 
Fall & Winter terms) 

PH1 1600 ETHICS (Taught in Social Science Department) 

This course involves a rigorous and systematic inquiry into man's moral 
behavior with the purpose of discovering the rules that ought to govern human 
action and the goals that are worth seeking in human life, using ethics as a 
science of conduct. 3-0-3* (offered Winter term) 

POS 1001 INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL SCIENCE 

This course introduces the student to the basic institution of government and 
highlights American political institutions, their characteristics, and major 
problems. The course expressly provides for a detailed study of the Constitution 
of the United States. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

POS 2041 AMERICAN NATIONAL GOVERNMENT 

This course strives to develop an understanding and appreciation of the political 
institutions of the United States. Its principal feature is an exhaustive study of 
the origin, nature and development of the Constitution of the United States. The 
course also includes a discussion of political parties, pressure groups, 
economic blocks, sectional interests, bodies of political and social opinion and 
other forces which influence the process of government. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, 
Winter & Spring terms) * Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

276 



Social Science 

POS2112 AMERICAN STATE AND LOCAL GOVERNMENT 

A continuation of the study of the government of the United States, this course 
emphasizes the role of the national administration, our federal system as it 
relates to state governments, including taxation problems, law enforcement and 
the administration of justice, problems of metropolitan areas, interstate 
relationships, government regulations, operation of public utilities and public 
planning. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

PSY 2012 GENERAL PSYCHOLOGY 

Designed to provide a representative survey of psychology, this course explores 
scientifically various aspects of human behavior and adjustment. The major 
emphases are on the study of important philosophical forces, the structure and 
function of personality, individual and group differences, the nature of in- 
telligence, the motivational aspects of behavior and emotions, the learning 
process and an orientation and critical appraisal of current psychological tests. 
3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

REL1210 THE OLD TESTAMENT 

This course is primarily an introduction to the study of the Bible. It deals with 
the history, literature, geography and religion of Israel and surrounding peoples 
through the Exile and Restoration. Course materials include the English Bible in 
various translations, authoritative source materials in the area of Old Testament 
study and the instructor's notes. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

REL1243 THE NEW TESTAMENT 

This course is essentially an introduction to the study of the New Testament. It 
involves a study of the language, literature and geography of the New Testament 
era. A study is also made of the discovery of the ancient manuscripts, history of 
modern translations, period between the Testaments, harmony of the Gospels 
and the history of the early church in the Acts and Epistles. Course materials 
include the English Bible in various translations, authoritative source materials 
in the area of New Testament study and the instructor's notes. 3-0-3* (offered 
Fall & Winter terms) 

REL 2300 INTRODUCTION TO THE MAJOR RELIGIONS OF THE WORLD 

This course introduces the student to an understanding of the major religions of 
the world. Religions studied are: Primitivism, Hinduism, Judaism, Shinto, 
Zorastrianism, Taoism Jainism, Buddhism, Confucianism, Christianity, Islam, 
and Sikhism. Each religion is dealt with in terms of its historical development, 
basic beliefs, practices, and contemporary importance. 3-0-3* (offered Winter 
term) 

SOP 2740 FEMINIST PSYCHOLOGY 

This course, focusing upon the historical and current roles of women, will 
emphasize psycho-social processes; sex-role stereotyping, discriminatory 
practices, sexism, men's liberation, the women's movement, and resources for 
maximizing human potential. An experiential approach is used in encouraging 
student exploration of current attitudes, interests, and aspirations as a way of 
stimulating and facilitating personal growth and self-awareness through in- 
teraction with others. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

SOC 1200 INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIAL SCIENCES 

This course introduces the student to the various disciplines of the social 
sciences which are interrelated and do not exist as distinct entities. The forces 
and factors that produce patterns of human interrelationships are examined 
with special emphasis on such basic institutions as the family, school, church 
and business. An underlying emphasis in the course is the meaningful 
significance of ongoing human culture. 3-0-3* (offered all terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

277 



Social Science 

SOC2000 INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY 

(Prerequisite: SOC 1200 or permission of department chairperson). This course 
provides an introduction to the scientific study of man's behavior in relation to 
other men, the general laws affecting the organization of such relationships, and 
the effects of social life on human personality and behavior. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, 
Winter & Spring terms) 

SOC 2020 AMERICAN SOCIAL PROBLEMS 

(Prerequisite: SOC 1200 or permission of the department chairperson). This 
course explores some of the major social problems now confronting American 
society — such as mental illness, crime, juvenile delinquency, economic in- 
security, influences detrimental to family stability (divorce, alcoholism, gam- 
bling, drug addiction), race relations, and related ethnic problems. The course 
attempts to establish criteria by which the educated layman can judge the 
probable effectiveness of various techniques of intervention for social im- 
provement. Emphasis is given to current social problems of pressing concern in 
the area of South Florida. 3-0-3* (offered Fall, Winter & Spring terms) 

SOC 2243 DEATH AND DYING 

This course focuses on the various issues and complex problems associated 
with death and dying resulting from changes in society itself. It encompasses a 
full range of topics, from grief, funeral practices, and widowhood to suicide, life 
beyond death, and the moral and ethical issues related to this subject of 
universal, compelling interest. 3-0-3* 

SS1 1949 CO-OP: SOCIAL SCIENCE TRAINING 

CO-Op Education in Social Science is a coordinated work-study program which 
reinforces the educational and professional growth of the student through 
parallel involvement in classroom studies and field experience in the student's 
chosen career. The student and teacher-coordinator determine the objectives 
for the on-the-job social science assignment. The student is evaluated by the 
teacher-coordinator and the immediate supervisor according to those ob- 
jectives. 1-10-3* 

SSI 2949 CO-OP: SOCIAL SCIENCE TRAINING II 
This is a continuation of SS1 1949. 1-10-3* 

STD1108 OPTIMAL SELF-DEVELOPMENT 

This course is designed to provide"the student with information about theories 
of optimal self-development and methods for achieving this goal. The self- 
directed activities provide an opportunity for self-understanding and for 
initiating a personally chosen self-change. 3-0-3* 

WOH 1012 ANCIENT AND MEDIEVAL CIVILIZATIONS 

This course delves into the theories of historical causation, the origin of life 
upon our planet and the emergence of major cultures. It delineates the 
characteristics of the major civilizations which evolved around the 
Mediterranean Sea from Ancient Egypt and the Fertile Crescent through Greece, 
Rome, the Byzantine and Islamic Cultures, and Medieval Europe to the 
Renaissance. The civilizations of the Far East, particularly India, China, and 
Japan, are also studied. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

WOH 1022 MODERN CIVILIZATIONS 

A continuation of WOH 1012, this course-begins with the background of the 
Renaissance and extends to the present time. Major emphasis is placed upon 
the development of modern Western European culture, with some consideration 
given to the forces and events contributing to the emergence of the Afro-Asian 
nations and peoples. 3-0-3* (offered Fall & Winter terms) 

* Lecture-Lab-Credit Hours 

278 



Index 



Index 



A 

Absence 74 

Absence from Examination 75 

Abstracts and Titles 151 

Academic Advisement 46 

Academic Department 

Chairpersons 11 

Academic Probation 76 

Academic Honors List 75 

Acceptance of Students 61 

Accounting 121 

Accreditation. 41 

Administrative Personnel 8 

Admissions 46 

Admissions, Early 57 

Admission Procedures 61 

Advanced Placement 57 

Advertising Design. 109 

Advisors, Academic 46 

Agriculture, (Plant Sciences) 251 

Air Conditioning and Refrigeration 

Specialists 189 

Air Conditioning Technology 180 

Alpha Gamma Sigma 47 

Alternate or Second Degrees 95 

Anthropology 272 

Architecture 110 

Art Department 109 

Art Education 110 

Art History 111 

Assemblies 46 

Assistantship, Students 50 

Associate in Arts 92 

Associate in Arts List 100 

Associate in Science 91 

Associate in Science List 102 

Astronomy. 262 

Athletics 46 

Attendance 74 

Audiology 160 

Auditors, (non-credit students) 74 

Automotive Technology 181 

B 

Bacteriology 250 

Band, Concert 221 

Banking 122 

Beachcomber 52 

BEOG (Basic Educational 

Opportunity Grant) 49 



Biology Section 250 

Biology, General 250 

Biology Teacher 250 

Board of Trustees 3 

Building Construction 190 

Building Construction 

Management 182 

Business Administration 122 

Business, (A.S.), Program List 102 

Business Department 121 

Business, General 129 

Business Education Teacher 123 

C 

Calendar. 4 

Campuses 42,43,44 

Career Information and Study 

Center 46 

Center for Early Learning 

Fees 71 

Center for Multi-Cultural 

Affairs 85 

Ceramics 114 

Certificate Programs 90- 

CEU Offerings 80 

Chemistry 257 

Chemistry Section 257 

Chemistry Teacher 257 

Chorus, Concert 221 

Citizenship 83 

Classified Personnel 26 

CLEP ...57 

Clerical Practice 124 

Clothing and Textiles 121 

Clubs, Service Clubs 48 

Clubs, Student 47,48 

College Level Examinations 

Program 57 

Commercial Graphic Arts Tech .... 1 12 

Commercial Pilot Technology 183 

Common Course Numbering 

System 103 

Communications 158 

Community Services 84 

Computer Science 190 

Computer Technology 184 

Concert Band 221 

Concert Chorus 221 

Confidential Personnel 26 

Conservation 250 

Construction, Building 182 



279 



Index 



Contents 2 

Continuing Education 80 

Cooperative Education 87 

Corrections . . 168 

Correspondence Courses 78 

Costs 67 

Counseling 48 

Counseling, Academic 48 

Counseling, Evening 48 

Creative Writing 158 

Credit by Examination 62,63 

Credits, Maximum. 76 

Credits, Military Service 58 

Criminal Justice 168 

Criminal Justice Dept 167 

Curriculum, Choice of 96 

D 

Degrees 91,92 

Degrees, Alternate or Second 95 

Delinquent Accounts 73 

Dental Assisting 174 

Dental Fees 69 

Dental Health Services 

Department 172 

Dental Health Services 

Admission 65 

Dental Hygiene 172 

Dental Lab Technology 173 

Departmental and Special Course 

Examinations 58 

Department Chairpersons 11 

Departments and Majors List 97 

Design, Interior 114 

Dietetics 121 

Diploma, High School 56 

District Board of Trustees 3 

Dormitories (none) 51 

Drafting and Design Technology. . . 184 

Drafting Specialist 189 

Drama — Speech 160 

Dual College Enrollment 66 

Dual Enrollment 57 

E 

Early Childhood Education 266 

Early Childhood Education 

Aides 268 

Economics 143 

Education, (see subject or field, 

i.e., business teacher, 

chemistry teacher, 

elementary teacher, etc.) 



Education, (Elementary Level). .... 269 

Education (Secondary Level) 272 

Electronics Technology 185 

Elementary Teacher 269 

Emergency Medical Tech 240 

Emeritus Faculty 28 

Engineering 192 

Engineering Technology 

Department 179 

English 158 

English Teacher 158 

Enrollment, Dual 57 

Equivalency Diploma, 

High School 56 

Evening Classes 41 

Executive Secretary 124 

F 

Faculty. .- 12 

Fall Term Calendar 5 

Fashion 126 

Fashion Merchandising 127 

Federal Education Benefits 53 

Federal Loans 50 

Fees 67 

Fees, Special 68 

Financial Aid, Student .49 

Fine Arts 112 

Fire Science 187 

Florida's Course Numbering ...... 103 

Food Service 128 

Food Service Management 128 

Foreign Languages 159 

Foreign Language Teacher 159 

Foreign Service 272 

Foundation, PBJC 41 

French 163 

Freshman .74 

Full-Time Students 74 

G 

General Biology 250 

General Business 129 

General Education 

Requirements, A.S 91 

General Education 

Requirements, A. A 92 

General Home Economics 129 

Geography 272 

Geology 262 

G.I. Benefit 53 

Glades, PBJC 42 

Government and Foreign 

Service 272 



280 



Index 



Grade Reports 75 

Grade Point Average 75 

Grading System 75 

Graduation Sophomore 

Scholarships 51 

Graduation Certificate 56 

Graduation Fee 72 

Graduation Requirements 94 

Graduation Requirements, A.A 92 

Graduation Requirements, A.S 91 

H 

Handicapped Students 66 

Health Education 234 

Health Services Form 61 

Health Services, Student 51 

High School Equivalency 56 

History 272 

History, PBJC 38 

Home Economics, General 129 

Home Economics . . . . ; 130 

Honorary Organizations 47 

Hospitality Management 131 

Hotel-Food Service 121 

Hotel-Motel Management 121 

Hours, Maximum 76 

Housing 51 

I 

Incomplete Grades 76 

In-State Fee 73 

Incomplete Work 76 

Industrial Arts 193 

Institute of Governments 84 

Institute of New Dimensions 84 

Insurance 86,132 

Insurance, Student 51 

Intercollegiate Athletics 46 

Interior Design 113 

Interior Design, Tech 114 

International Business 134 

International Education 

Acceptance 65 

International&lntercultural 

Education 88 

International Students 51,60 

International Studies 270 

International Trade 134 

Intramural 51 

J 

Jazz Ensemble 222 



Jo . °lacement .52 

Journalism 159 

L 

Lab Fees 69 

Land Surveying 188 

Law Enforcement 168 

Law Enforcement Education 

Program (LEEP) 50 

Legal Assistant 134 

Legal Secretary 1 24 

Letter of Acceptance 61 

Liberal Arts 158 

Librarian 207 

Library Dept 207 

Library Fees 69 

Loans 50 

Lost and Found 52 

LPN to RN Program 225 

LPN to RN Program, 

Admissions 64 

M 

Major Field Undecided 96 

Majors 96 

Management 128 

Management, Hotel-Motel 121 

Marine Biology 250 

Marketing/Management 135 

Mathematician 208 

Mathematics Department 208 

Mathematics Teacher 209 

Math Learning Center 209 

Medical Laboratory 

Technology 236 

Medical Technology 235 

Medical Secretary 124 

Mental Health Technology 237 

Merchandising (Retailing) 121 

Meteorology 262 

Microprocessors 202 

Military Service Credits 58 

Montessori Specialization 269 

Multi-Media Instruction 85 

Music 213 

Music Department 213 

Music Education 213 

Music Fees 69 

Music Organizations 221,222 

N 

Newspaper, Student 52 



281 



Index 



Non-Credit Fees 72 

Non-Credit Offerings 80 

Non-Credit Students 74 

Non-Degree Programs 90 

Non-Florida Students 73 

North, PBJC ." 44 

Nursing 224 

Nursing, Admission 63 

Nursing Department 224 

O 

Occupational Therapy 

Assistant Admissions 65 

Occupational Therapy 239 

Occupational Therapy Assistant. . . 238 

Occupational Offerings 80 

Orchestra, Concert 221 

Organizations, Honorary 47 

Organizations, Student Body 48 

Orientation 52 

Out-of-State Fees 67 

Out-of-State Students 73 

P 

Pacesetters 222 

Palm Beach Junior College 

District 42 

Paramedic 240 

PBJC Central 42 

PBJC Foundation, Inc 41 

PBJC Glades 42 

PBJC North 44 

PBJC South 43 

Parking Fees 68 

Part-Time Instructors . . 22 

Personalized System 

of Instruction 207 

PhiRhoPi 47 

Phi Theta Kappa 47 

Philosophy 271 

Philosophy, PBJC 39 

Photography 114 

Physical Education 230 

Physical Education 

Department 230 

Physical Education Fees 69 

Physical Education 

Requirements 230 

Physical Therapy. 241 

Physics 262 

Physical Sciences Section 262 

Placement, Advanced 57 

Placement, Job 52 



Placement Tests 61 

Plant Sciences (Agriculture) 251 

Points, Quality 75 

Police, (Law Enforcement) 168 

Policies .77 

Political Science 272 

Popular Music and Jazz 215 

Popular Music and Jazz 

Certificate 215 

Pre-Dental 258 

Pre-Law 270 

Pre-Medical 258 

Pre-Ministry 271 

Pre-Nursing 226 

Pre-Optometry 260 

Pre-Pharmacy 258 

Pre-Podiatry 259 

Pre- Veterinary 258 

Prerequisites 78 

President's Scholar Awards 49 

Professional Program List 102 

Professional&Supervisory 

Personnel 9 

Project Ahead 58 

Psychology 273 

Public Administration 136 

Public Relations 149 

Publications Student 52 

Purposes 40 

Q 
Quality Points 54,75 

R 

Radiological Technology 242 

Reactivated Students 66 

Reading Center 52 

Reading Improvement 52 

Real Estate 86 

Recruitment 52 

Refrigeration Technology 180 

Refunds 72 

Registration 52 

Regulations Changes v 78 

Regulations, General 55 

Related Health Programs 234 

Repeated Courses 78 

Reports, Grade 75 

Resident Student 73 

Retailing 121 

RN — A.S., Degree 224 

s 

Sales and Marketing 121 

Scholarships and Grants 49 

Science Department 250 



282 



Index 



Science Education 250 

Second Degree 95 

Secretary, Executive 121 

Secretary, Medical 121 

Senior Citizens 66 

Senior Citizens Fee 72 

SEOG (Secondary Educational 

Opportunity Grants) 49 

Service, Clubs 47,48 

Service Credits 58 

Short Course Fee '. 72 

Sigma Epsilon Mu 47 

Sigma Phi Alpha 47 

Social Clubs 47,48 

Social Science 272 

Social Science Department 265 

Social Science Teacher 272 

Social Security Benefit 73 

Sociology 272 

Solar Energy 203 

South, PBJC 43 

Sophomore 74 

Spanish 163 

Special Course Examinations 62 

Special Fees 68 

Special Interest Groups 48 

Specialized, Business, Technical, 

Professional Program List .... 102 
Specialized Programs, Admission . . 62 

Specialized Programs, List 102 

Speech — Drama 160 

Speech Pathology 160 

Sports 46 

Spring Term Calendar 81-82 6 

Summer Term Calendar 81-82 6 

Student Affairs & Services 45 

Student Assistantships 50 

Student Auditors (non-credit) 74 

Student Body Organizations 48 

Student Classifications 73 

Student Clubs 48 

Student Conduct 77 

Student Fee Audit 73 

Student Financial Aid 49 

Student Government 47 

Student Handbook 52 

Student Health Services 51 

Student Load. 76 

Student Loans 50 

Student Publication 52 

Student Records 77 



Student, Full-time 74 

Student Residence Classification . . 73 
Student Retention 

and Completion 53 

Student, Foreign 60 

Students, Handicapped 66 

Surveying, Land 188 

Surveyor Technician 189 

T 
Teacher (see subject or field, i.e. 
business teacher, chemistry 
teacher, elementary teacher, 
etc.) 

Technical Program List 102 

Testing 53 

Trade, International 134 

Traffic Fines 68 

Transcript, College 63 

Transcript Fee 68 

Transcripts, High School 61 

Transfer Students 59 

Transient Students 59 

Trustees 3 

Tuition 67 

u 

University Parallel List 100 

Unpaid Accounts 78 

V 

Veterans Administration 

Benefits . . . 53 

Vocational Rehabilitation 

Scholarships 51 

W 

Water and Wastewater 

Technology 252 

Welfare Worker 272 

Winter Term Calendar 5 

Withdrawals 74 

Women's Center 85 

Work Study Program 50 

Workshop Fees 72 

Work Study 49 

Writing, Creative 158 

z 

Zoology 250 



283 



Notes 



284 



LL 



LU 
< 




i-v-**-- 



Palm Beach kmoi uoiie|ft 
Library. 




PALM BEACH COMMUNITY COLLEGE LIBRARY 



3 4901 01113966 3 ^ 

Dhi-A**^ 



Coll egl 



Archives 378.1543 P18b 

1981/82 

Palm Beach Junior 

College. 

The bulletin of Palm 

Beach Junior College. 

1961-1988. 



REFERENCE ROOM 




Lake Worth, Fla. 33461